Pages: [1] 2   Go Down

Author Topic: Hiking backpack  (Read 2633 times)

Benny Profane

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 307
Hiking backpack
« on: May 28, 2021, 03:48:43 pm »

Talk to me about my new backpack. It has to have hydration, big priority. Doesn't have to be too big, because I shoot with a Fuji XT-30 and a few lenses. I envision a GFX 100S in my future, although Super Resolution may have saved me a lot of money and bother going there. Amazing development in post processing. I prefer a monopod, but definitely room for a tripod. Should be sturdy and reliable, and have easy access. Would be nice to have some sort of carry feature or storage for layers of clothing, and a built in rain cover.

Thanks.
Logged

BernardLanguillier

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 13923
    • http://www.flickr.com/photos/bernardlanguillier/sets/
Re: Hiking backpack
« Reply #1 on: May 28, 2021, 04:14:29 pm »

Since the weight you save on the pack means more options for photo equipment and safety (including clothing, navigation,Ö) I personally recommend Z packs hyper light packs over photo bags.

Their 55L weights 600 gr and is mostly natively weather proof. The belt is comfortable up to 13 kg.

For day trips they have a beltless/frameless 30l pack weighting an incredible 260gr. If the weather forecast is low risk I couple that with a Gore shakedry Arcteryx trailrunning weighting 120gr with a rain skirt weighting 100gr. Pack and rain protection add up to less than 500grÖ but that isnít very comfortable.

The next major thing being to eat salty stuff to increase water retention and reduce the amount of water to carry along. It really depends on many factors but that sometimes enables me to just pack 1-1.5L water per day, which again helps.

Cheers,
Bernard
« Last Edit: May 28, 2021, 04:19:31 pm by BernardLanguillier »
Logged

armand

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 5201
    • Photos
Re: Hiking backpack
« Reply #2 on: May 28, 2021, 05:34:50 pm »

There's a rabbit hole I recently got caught in again too  ;)

You need more parameters: how much you hike if any, is it just for travel and does  it have to fit  under an airplane chair, etc.

The photobackpacks don't carry weight that well compared to dedicated hiking backpacks, so if you hike a lot it might make sense to just use a hiking backpack with a photo insert. I just ordered myself 2 Deuters Futura fit this purpose, a 36 Pro and a regular 24L. Have yet to receive them. I wanted a mesh back panel, I have others.

I do have several photo backpacks but they either don't carry weight that well or are too bulky for general use. A small Lowepro that works okish for short hikes with a couple of lenses and an older Kata that carries quite  a lot but not that gracefully so it's good mostly for travel. I also have a Mindshift 180 Pro that's just too bulky for usual trips, to my dismay I used it only a couple of times and now sits for nothing.

I'm looking for something that has a waist belt that is somehow functional to carry weight and ideally with a back access, fit moderate trips in intensity and time (4-6h). Lowepro has a couple of candidates among others.

Benny Profane

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 307
Re: Hiking backpack
« Reply #3 on: May 28, 2021, 06:54:28 pm »

Well, just got back from two weeks in Southern Utah, GC, and Death Valley, so you know why I'm obsessed with hydration. Also, I'm reading a really morbid book about death in the Grand Canyon that everyone should read a bit of before visiting that park, even if you've been there a few times. https://www.amazon.com/Over-Edge-Canyon-Expanded-Anniversary/dp/0984785809 It's not just falls, it's also lack of water. Death Valley is even more life threatening at many a moment, and could suck you dry in short time.

My dream would be for Camelback to make a photo backpack. I think it would be well designed for the purpose. They make great stuff.

Should be overhead compatible, at least. But, ironically, I would prefer it fits inside my Patagonia 60L carry on, just to cushion the equipment better. That has backstraps, too.
Logged

BernardLanguillier

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 13923
    • http://www.flickr.com/photos/bernardlanguillier/sets/
Re: Hiking backpack
« Reply #4 on: May 28, 2021, 09:36:18 pm »

Well, just got back from two weeks in Southern Utah, GC, and Death Valley, so you know why I'm obsessed with hydration. Also, I'm reading a really morbid book about death in the Grand Canyon that everyone should read a bit of before visiting that park, even if you've been there a few times. https://www.amazon.com/Over-Edge-Canyon-Expanded-Anniversary/dp/0984785809 It's not just falls, it's also lack of water. Death Valley is even more life threatening at many a moment, and could suck you dry in short time.

My dream would be for Camelback to make a photo backpack. I think it would be well designed for the purpose. They make great stuff.

Should be overhead compatible, at least. But, ironically, I would prefer it fits inside my Patagonia 60L carry on, just to cushion the equipment better. That has backstraps, too.

Indeed, this really depends on the environment. I donít have much desert hiking experience.

If I were to go back to heavier packs for heavy load carrying I would look at Mystery Ranch or Gregory these days.

Inside the hiking pack I protect my body/lenses with individual poaches from various makers and wrap clothes around them. That has been working very well for me.

Cheers,
Bernard

armand

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 5201
    • Photos
Re: Hiking backpack
« Reply #5 on: May 29, 2021, 12:06:55 am »

Well, just got back from two weeks in Southern Utah, GC, and Death Valley, so you know why I'm obsessed with hydration. Also, I'm reading a really morbid book about death in the Grand Canyon that everyone should read a bit of before visiting that park, even if you've been there a few times. https://www.amazon.com/Over-Edge-Canyon-Expanded-Anniversary/dp/0984785809 It's not just falls, it's also lack of water. Death Valley is even more life threatening at many a moment, and could suck you dry in short time.

My dream would be for Camelback to make a photo backpack. I think it would be well designed for the purpose. They make great stuff.

Should be overhead compatible, at least. But, ironically, I would prefer it fits inside my Patagonia 60L carry on, just to cushion the equipment better. That has backstraps, too.

So probably up to 45-50 liters. I have the same Patagonia (older version, newer ones I think they call them 55L). I donít think youíll have much room if any in that duffel with a decent sized backpack. Iíll see if the Deuters will fit.

I wanted to have them specifically with a tensioned mesh back for the hot weather. They have water bladder pockets that can hold at least 2L, probably 3L also, and also pockets to accommodate 2 water bottles, at least 1L each. I tested in REI an Osprey Manta 34L that has an included 2.5L water bladder. Felt comfortable and has plenty of room for a decent sized photo insert. I got the Deuters because they were on sale with much better prices. You can still swing a 20% off a full price item in many outdoor stores.

MattBurt

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 3430
  • Looking for that other shot
    • Matt Burt Photography
Re: Hiking backpack
« Reply #7 on: May 29, 2021, 01:01:06 am »

If I'm hiking to go backpacking or summiting a peak I usually carry a hiking or backpacking pack with an ICU for the camera gear.
If the hike might just be a couple of hours or less and/or it's a specific photo mission I need my full kit for, I take more camera stuff and the Thinktank/Mindshift BackLight 18L.
For hydration it just has a bottle sleeve but it carries well and gives easy access to your gear without setting it down.
It has room for some clothing and lunch on top of a body and three zoom full frame kit with room to spare.
A solid pack and my best camera pack yet.
Logged
-MattB

Benny Profane

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 307
Re: Hiking backpack
« Reply #8 on: May 29, 2021, 09:59:14 am »

That's a nice pack. I think I am going to have to accept water bottles instead of an internal bladder in my final choice. I understand why designers have eliminated this feature, but, I like all that weight centered on my upper spine, instead of dangling off the side. Also, we were using the ice machine at hotels to fill our camelback bladders, which not only gives you very nice cold water for hours, but cools the back.
Logged

MattBurt

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 3430
  • Looking for that other shot
    • Matt Burt Photography
Re: Hiking backpack
« Reply #9 on: May 31, 2021, 04:55:05 pm »

That's a nice pack. I think I am going to have to accept water bottles instead of an internal bladder in my final choice. I understand why designers have eliminated this feature, but, I like all that weight centered on my upper spine, instead of dangling off the side. Also, we were using the ice machine at hotels to fill our camelback bladders, which not only gives you very nice cold water for hours, but cools the back.

Yeah I swear by bladders with my other packs for skiing, hiking, and mountain biking so I'm also a fan of them for active stuff.
But the nice thing with the Backlight is if you put a bottle in one side and the tripod on the other side carry, it balances out somewhat. I like doing that instead of the dedicated center tripod carry which is too far away from your center of mass to not be annoying.
Logged
-MattB

David Sutton

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1345
    • David Sutton Photography
Re: Hiking backpack
« Reply #10 on: May 31, 2021, 11:36:48 pm »

There's also the question of how much energy the backpack sucks out of your body because of its design. A real issue if you are out all day.
You could check out Aarn:
https://www.aarnpacks.com/
I've done 2 to 3 day hikes with one with an XT-2 and lenses and snacks and water in the front pouches and food/clothing/sleeping gear in the back. Amazing how good a balanced backpack is compared to the packs of my youth. The downside is you tend to stand out a bit compared to what most people are using.
« Last Edit: June 01, 2021, 03:22:10 am by David Sutton »
Logged

armand

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 5201
    • Photos
Re: Hiking backpack
« Reply #11 on: June 01, 2021, 01:14:37 am »

There's also the question of how much energy the backpack sucks out of you body because of its design. A real issue if you are out all day.
You could check out Aarn:
https://www.aarnpacks.com/
I've done 2 to 3 day hikes with one with an XT-2 and lenses and snacks and water in the front pouches and food/clothing/sleeping gear in the back. Amazing how good a balanced backpack is compared to the packs of my youth. The downside is you tend to stand out a bit compared to what most people are using.

Interesting! I think I might have seen this at some point. I have no doubts that you are better balanced, particularly if the front pack also anchors on the waist. The problem is, and I know this because I occasionally similarly use a small bag with a camera, that you donít have a very good view of where you put your step. For nice trails itís not a problem, but for more technical ones it can be dangerous not seeing exactly where you are putting your foot.

David Sutton

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1345
    • David Sutton Photography
Re: Hiking backpack
« Reply #12 on: June 01, 2021, 03:26:11 am »

Interesting! I think I might have seen this at some point. I have no doubts that you are better balanced, particularly if the front pack also anchors on the waist. The problem is, and I know this because I occasionally similarly use a small bag with a camera, that you donít have a very good view of where you put your step. For nice trails itís not a problem, but for more technical ones it can be dangerous not seeing exactly where you are putting your foot.

Correct.
With the Aarn I used it was possible to set up the two front pouches so I could look down and see my feet. But ground visibility was reduced.
Edit: I said I'd never let these photos out. Never mind, this is what the pack looked like:
« Last Edit: June 01, 2021, 03:40:02 am by David Sutton »
Logged

jrp

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 319
Re: Hiking backpack
« Reply #13 on: June 01, 2021, 11:32:03 am »

Donít ever let it be said that you havenít suffered for your art.
Logged

dreed

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1692
Re: Hiking backpack
« Reply #14 on: June 01, 2021, 12:46:08 pm »

That's a nice pack. I think I am going to have to accept water bottles instead of an internal bladder in my final choice. I understand why designers have eliminated this feature, but, I like all that weight centered on my upper spine, instead of dangling off the side. Also, we were using the ice machine at hotels to fill our camelback bladders, which not only gives you very nice cold water for hours, but cools the back.

I pack water on the bottom, so that it can't leak "up" and onto anything (i.e cameras/lenses). Heavy things should be as low as possible so that the weight is on your hips, not shoulders.
Logged

David Sutton

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1345
    • David Sutton Photography
Re: Hiking backpack
« Reply #15 on: June 01, 2021, 06:48:11 pm »

I think I am going to have to accept water bottles instead of an internal bladder in my final choice.
Tramping club members here report that the tube fills with unpleasant looking algae if not carefully maintained. But could be dependent on the climate the bladder is used in.
Logged

armand

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 5201
    • Photos
Re: Hiking backpack
« Reply #16 on: June 02, 2021, 12:32:25 am »

I have a love/hate relationship with water bladders. They are convenient but theoretically not as safe as they can break.
My main issue is taste though. While they might be semi decent at some point I have yet to find a bladder that is and/or remains tasteless. When you are thirsty you'll drink it but it takes away some of the joy of being out there. I tried with some various things, such as lemon  juice, baking soda, etc but the success has been limited.

Benny Profane

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 307
Re: Hiking backpack
« Reply #17 on: June 02, 2021, 03:40:56 pm »

Tramping club members here report that the tube fills with unpleasant looking algae if not carefully maintained. But could be dependent on the climate the bladder is used in.

I keep mine in the fridge when not in use, and have not had problems. My guess is that those problems happen when packs are left in hot cars or just lying around.
Logged

mcbroomf

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1314
    • Mike Broomfield
Re: Hiking backpack
« Reply #18 on: June 03, 2021, 04:17:36 am »

I'd not thought of keeping mine in the 'fridge.  I'll see if I have enough room.

In the mean time one of the brush kits is needed rather than just flushing.  Plenty of the around.  I have the Camelback

https://www.google.com/search?q=hydration+bladder+cleaning+brush&oq=water+bladder+cleanin&aqs=chrome.3.0l2j69i57j0i22i30l7.11708j0j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8
https://www.amazon.com/CamelBak-90640-Camelbak-Cleaning-Brush/dp/B0019DGBAK
Logged

Smoothjazz

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 90
Re: Hiking backpack
« Reply #19 on: June 07, 2021, 04:26:03 pm »

I have an AARN backpack also- a little quarky in terms of appearance, but makes a lot of sense to balance your load- with other packs all the weight is on your back, pulling you backwards and off balance.

Their website has a great many examples of why balancing the weight is far better when carrying any significant amount of weight.
I use my front pouches to carry my water bottles, which can weigh quite a bit.

Cheers,

John
Logged
Pages: [1] 2   Go Up