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Author Topic: Glove Recomendations  (Read 17937 times)

Chris_T

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Glove Recomendations
« Reply #20 on: December 21, 2006, 09:09:58 am »

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They're not terribly warm, but they're a lot better than nothing.  When it gets colder I layer fingerless fleece gloves over them.  I've had no problem with them with moisture buildup.  I can do everything to the camera with them on except open the 1D's battery compartment, which requires a fingernail.  I was even able to tie on a couple of small flies while wearing them on a recent fishing trip in the snow in Idaho.  I like them a lot.

Nill
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Have you compared those latex gloves used in hospitals? Seems like they may serve the same purpose as the Foxgloves: snug, but not warm. Plus they are disposable.
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howiesmith

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Glove Recomendations
« Reply #21 on: December 21, 2006, 09:26:15 am »

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Have you compared those latex gloves used in hospitals? Seems like they may serve the same purpose as the Foxgloves: snug, but not warm. Plus they are disposable.
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Latex gloves are water proof, and your hands may sweat inside.  They have no insulation, so they may be cold.

Someone earlier suggest Goretex.  Goretex breathes and lets moisture out while being windproof.  They seem like they would be very warm as an outer layer.  More expensive than Latex.

Mittens are warmer than gloves.  You might consider a pair that can be easily removed when working with the camera's controls.
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francois

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Glove Recomendations
« Reply #22 on: December 21, 2006, 10:14:08 am »

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Latex gloves are water proof, and your hands may sweat inside. They have no insulation, so they may be cold.
You're right, latex glove will make you hands sweat and then freeze if temperature goes down.

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Someone earlier suggest Goretex. Goretex breathes and lets moisture out while being windproof. They seem like they would be very warm as an outer layer. More expensive than Latex.
Look for WindStopper gloves, they are made of a combination of Gore membrane and fleece gloves. For 30F,  that's plenty of protection! They only drawbacks are price and they're not waterproof.
« Last Edit: December 21, 2006, 10:16:24 am by francois »
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Francois

howiesmith

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Glove Recomendations
« Reply #23 on: December 21, 2006, 10:24:08 am »

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You're right, latex glove will make you hands sweat and then freeze if temperature goes down.
Look for WindStopper gloves, they are made of a combination of Gore membrane and fleece gloves. For 30F,  that's plenty of protection! They only drawbacks are price and they're not waterproof.
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Are Windstoppers at least water repellant?  I always thought the Goretex layer was waterproof.  Maybe it is the outer part that gets wet.
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francois

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« Reply #24 on: December 21, 2006, 11:10:34 am »

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Are Windstoppers at least water repellant? I always thought the Goretex layer was waterproof. Maybe it is the outer part that gets wet.
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Not very repellent, in fact GoreTex is waterproof but seams are not taped in WindStopper gloves and when the outer part (fleece) is soaked then water makes its way into the gloves. So, they are best worn best  when it's dry or when it's cold enough to avoid rain (snow is OK).
On the other hand, GoreTex gloves are generally taped and waterproof but less breathable.
« Last Edit: December 21, 2006, 11:12:27 am by francois »
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Francois

framah

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« Reply #25 on: December 21, 2006, 11:28:52 am »

My best gloves I have I got up in Churchill, Canada and they are sealskin fur on the outside and a sheepskin lining. Not much good for photography or ANYTHING requiring dexterity  but, BOY are my hands warm when I'm pushing the snowblower!!    
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framah

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« Reply #26 on: December 21, 2006, 11:32:07 am »

Actually, the best gloves I have had for shooting in the winter are the gloves with the fingertips cut off and a mitten hood is attached to the back of the glove. When you are done needing your finger tips, you just flip the hood over and you are warm again. The thumb also has a little hood to cover it as well.
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John Camp

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« Reply #27 on: December 21, 2006, 04:48:53 pm »

If it actually gets cold enough to snow where you're at, go to a cross-country ski store and get some xc-ski gloves. They are usually thin, light, and wind and water repellant, and very good for photography. These are not the same as downhill ski gloves, by the way, which are much heavier and thicker. Another good possibility is shooting gloves from an outdoor sports store. This is basically the same story as the xc-ski gloves, except that some shooting gloves have a trigger-finger slit that allows you to actually expose your trigger finger without taking the glove off, thus making it easier to shoot, either a gun or a camera.

In *really* cold weather you need either mitts or big gloves with liner gloves, so you can take off the heavy gloves but leave the lliners on when you shoot, so you don't expose skin...but that's a whole different thing.  

JC
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McKenzie

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« Reply #28 on: December 22, 2006, 05:34:27 am »

I use Mountain Hardwear Heavyweight Powerstretch gloves.  They are the thickest gloves I've found that allow me to operate a camera.  They work reasonably well for me at 30 degrees F.  I have very poor circulation in my hands, however, so they might suffice for the average person at lower temperatures.  They are somewhat wind-resistant, but not very water-resistant.
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jani

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« Reply #29 on: December 22, 2006, 06:06:20 pm »

I currently use Norheim gloves with Thinsulate (TM by 3M, I think), with faux suede leather fingertips on the index and middle fingers, and in the palm.

They're made for sports, but seem to work nicely down to about -5 C (23 F). The grip is good.

Black Diamond -- mentioned earlier by Bernard -- have a wide range of gloves, and I would most certainly accept his recommendation here.
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marcmccalmont

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« Reply #30 on: December 24, 2006, 03:13:00 pm »

Two thoughts;
1. The 30-30-30 rule 30 degrees F, 30 mph wind and 30 seconds = frostbite
2. If you do work in the cold do as ski lift mechanics do, rub a dab of petroleum jelly, Vaseline (not enough to remain oily)  into the skin (hands and face) this prevents both frostbite and arthritis.

Merry Christmas
Marc

PS. this is a "Grandmothers remedy" that works
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Marc McCalmont

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« Reply #31 on: December 28, 2006, 05:02:47 pm »

Now that the holiday madness has worn down, I visited my local REI store with my camera in tow and picked up a pair of gloves.

The store didn't have a huge selection and most of what was there was either warm and had grip or had good tactile feedback and slippery on the camera. I did however find one pair of REI One "Multisports" using that polartec stuff in my size. They are light gloves with leather palms that should do the trick.

I did see the Black Diamonds there but they only had one model, the "Jetstream;" whatever that means. I think they would have been better all-around gloves than what I bought but they had one big problem. The grip pads stopped short of the finger tips rendering them completely pointless.

The next few nights should be freezing and very windy so I'll post again once I get a chance to use them.
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Jay Kaplan

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« Reply #32 on: December 28, 2006, 10:06:51 pm »

You might want to go to a sporting goods store such as Dick's here on the east coast. They feature a large selection of performance wear such as from UnderArmour. They make a whole line of cold weather clothing and one of their items are gloves. It is my understanding that they are "thin" and light weight" so they may also work for photographers.

Me, my hands hurt in cold weather, a circulation problem, so I tend to spend as little time outside as possible at this time of year. Fortunately, it has been somewhat temperate here in Maryland so far this winter - we even had a 72 degree day this month.
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filip baraka

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« Reply #33 on: January 03, 2007, 07:03:41 am »

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I've recently moved to a colder climate than the deserts I've previously lived and am in the market for a good pair of gloves.

What gloves do readers recommend for around 30-40 deg. F use and where can I buy them? Any particular brands/designs/materials/etc to look out for?

Mind you, I'm a complete glove noob; I've never owned a pair before and have no clue what's available.

Thanks,
Dan
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For that temperatures I'm using Lowepro photo gloves, quite good!
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jimhuber

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« Reply #34 on: January 03, 2007, 02:52:57 pm »

My experience with gloves is mostly motorcycling, where wind chill is a real factor, and flexibility and feel are life-and-death vital. I've found that gloves are less of an issue if you keep your core adequately warm, and legs are almost as important. Wool socks and good boots will do more for your hands than most gloves. In short, make sure the rest of you is warm first and you won't need that much glove.
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Nill Toulme

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« Reply #35 on: January 03, 2007, 03:30:06 pm »

Spoken like a man with good circulation in his hands.  ;-)

Nill
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dobson

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« Reply #36 on: January 03, 2007, 05:42:17 pm »

I second those who recommend powerstretch gloves. I own the Black Diamond powerstretch gloves and love them; as do my family and friends. Fleece gloves do not have to be waterproof to work, you can dip your hand in a freezing lake and soon your hand will warm right up (they don't really hold much water). The powerstretch gloves are also very dextrous, cheap, and pretty durable; mine have endured and entire climbing season with only a few scratches on the leather palm.

As the temperature decreases I have found that the best gloves in terms of warmth and dexterity are those designed for ice climbing. They have to be warm when you are bashing you knuckes on ice all day; and they must also be dextrous because fumbling gear could kill you. Though relatively bulky, my BD Ice gloves work well for photography in more extreme conditions. I never have to take them off to work with my camera, and they are as warm as it gets without mittens.

Phillip
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SELPHICK

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« Reply #37 on: February 04, 2007, 07:42:24 pm »

GLOVES are great, but for low temps consider hot packs  for your gloves, these exothermic pads are good for hands and feet, probably available thru Cabela's outddor store , absolutely available  thru Le Baron's outdoor store in Canada. Keeps your batteries warm as well.
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pl2se

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« Reply #38 on: February 05, 2007, 10:13:19 am »

I have to confess that I have not read all your answers, and there seam to be a lot of opinions...

I live in Northern Sweden and it seldom is that cold. _30 to -40 F equals -34 to -40 in celcius and we do have al least a week with temperatures dropping below minus 30 every year. And I can only give you one advice. Forget everything in the line of "finger-gloves". (I probably have the wrong word, but I hope you understand ) When its that cold you need a pair of gloves where your 4 fingers stay together and only the thumb has its own "compartment". Its gonna be really cold, and i suggest some form of warming devices. There is battery or alcholoc driven heaters and i would suggest keeping one one the camera! Batterys will run out, even on a 1D and I promise you that you wont be happy taking your gloves of. Keep your hands in your gloves and get a camera with excellent ergonomic which let you shot with gloves on!

Peter
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kitalight

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« Reply #39 on: February 09, 2007, 10:57:09 pm »

a cabretta golf glove...for lefties of course...
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