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Author Topic: Best Camera to upgrade for landscape photography recommendations wanted please  (Read 1775 times)

Wastwater

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Hi all, I am new to site and wanted to get the advice and expertise of you all out there if you can spare the time.  Describe myself as reasonably serious amateur, photography is my passion but nursing pays the bills. Aged 60 now, looking to buy one final camera that hopefully may see me through life. So many articles so many recommendations out there, it becomes confusing after a while. What to get, when to get as thereís always rumours of something new on the horizon even better. Friends tell me Sony alpha. Would welcome all your thoughts and wisdom. Currently I have canon eos 5D mkll, along with three l series lens and a samyang manual wide angle. Everything I own is geared to canon, itís all I have used ever. I dream of selling odd print but not delusional I know I wonít be making living at it. So looking to upgrade to best camera for the job which hopefully  may allow the continued use of existing lens kit given it was hard earned money to get them. So what do you recommend and also if I had to change to different make and use say lens adapter does that have much of an impact on the lens use and finished product? Thank you all. Simon
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JeffSD

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    • Jeff Maysent Photography

Hi, Simon.

I've been a Nikon and Leica guy for quite a long time and my best advice is to focus on your personal vision of the type of work you want to do and then choose the gear that will help you accomplish it.

Your Canon 5DII is a fine camera, and very capable of producing excellent prints. Since you're familiar with the Canon ecosystem, one alternative is to study the photographers you admire who use Canon gear and get an appreciation for the lenses that they use and their approaches toward shooting, post-processing and printing. William Neil, for example, has made some very fine photographs and prints using Canon equipment. Kevin Raber did a nice series of videos with Mr. Neil for LL that are worth viewing.

For me, quality lenses, good camera support tools (for landscape work, especially), post-processing technique and printing skills have become more important than camera bodies in developing a body of work and creating prints that people would like to own.

Best,
Jeff

   

Jonathan Cross

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You write that you want one final camera.  One of the current considerations is kit weight.  DLSRs are usually heavier than mirrorless. Full frame kit is heavier than APSC. I have just sold my Canon DLSR kit and am now all Fuji and weight and size were big influencers. It was a gradual changeover, but I found I was using my Canon 5d3 and EF lenses less and less. Others prefer Sony, Nikon, Canon and other mirrorless.

Do give thought to what you want to photograph and where you are going to carry your kit.

Have fun, but don't rush into a major decision.

Best wishes,

Jonathan
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Jonathan in UK

Paulo Bizarro

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My recommendation is stay with Canon, perhaps upgrading the camera to a 5DR (the one with 50 mpx). You already seem to have fine lenses, maybe get one of their nice TSE (17mm or 24mm).

kers

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Maybe an idea is to rent some gear and find out what you like, and what improvement is possible.
Lensquality made a jump the last decade and mirrorless bodies were introduced.
you can rent ( or from your friend)  a new Sony 64MP body with a stellar lens ( 24mm 1.4 wide for instance)  on it to see if you like/need 64mp, a mirrorless body, Sony ergonomics, lenses...  in the end it is also very subjective.

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John Hollenberg

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I think there are two reasonable options depending on price, megapixels desired and dynamic range:

1) Canon 5DSr or 5D Mark 4 (the latter available for $2,000 right now) - I have the 5DSr which is more expensive, has less dynamic range but more megapixels; 5D Mark 4 is cheaper, better dynamic range, fewer megapixels

2) Sony A7r3 or A7r4 plus metabones adapter - I have the A7r2 and use it with metabones adapter for my Canon lenses; outstanding dynamic range, no mirror slap, screwy menu system

I prefer the A7r2 for landscape and the 5DSr for wildlife.
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RichDesmond

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Keep in mind too that there's more than just technical specs. Virtually any camera you can buy now is capable of stunning prints.
Which means, IMO, is that things like ergonomics and usability should take on more weight in the decision. How the camera feels in the hand, how intuitive the controls and menus are to you, just how much you enjoy shooting with it.
Renting a few different cameras with a lens or two makes a lot of sense.
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Paul_Roark

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I was a Canon person until a Leicaphile and I did a comparison of some real world landscape images.  There was no comparison.  The Leica glass was way better than my best, "L" series Canon optics.  Now I shoot with a Sony a7riv, modified with a KoloriVision ultra-thin sensor cover, and Leica-M glass adapted via a Voigtlander VM-E mount.  Leica glass and Sony 61 mp sensor make an outstanding combination, at least for landscape work.

Paul
www.PaulRoark.com
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JeffSD

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    • Jeff Maysent Photography

Simon, a couple other quick thoughts on the subject of printing your work:

- I found the LL videos "Camera to Print & Screen (https://luminous-landscape.com/videos/camera-print-screen/) and "Back to the Print" (https://luminous-landscape.com/videos/back-to-the-print/) to be well done and very useful. While these videos are getting a bit long in the tooth and worthy of an update, they still contain some great information and are worth your time.

- When considering new gear to purchase, you might want to try working backwards from the print. By that I mean, print a few of your best images and look at them very closely and critically. Catalog the flaws and develop a plan to address them. In my case, few of the flaws in my prints related to my camera. Most were due to lens issues (eg. chromatic aberrations and weak corner performance), post processing flaws (mine) and poor decisions about lighting conditions (also, mine).

Best,
Jeff

     

Wolfman

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I'll keep it simple. I had the 5D2 and moved to the Sony R-Series and the image quality was a big improvement...great dynamic range and resolution. If you want to save money I would consider the Sony A7r3....excellent camera for image quality and smaller and lighter. You can adapt your Canon lenses with Sigma MC-11 or Metabones...Sigma is a little less money. Rent it at Lens Rentals with the appropriate adapter.

Doug Peterson

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Hi all, I am new to site and wanted to get the advice and expertise of you all out there if you can spare the time.  Describe myself as reasonably serious amateur, photography is my passion but nursing pays the bills. Aged 60 now, looking to buy one final camera that hopefully may see me through life.

You don't provide a budget, so I'll be "that guy" and suggest a Phase One XT.

Best resolution, best dynamic range, best possible lenses, movements built in, and dedicated landscape-friendly tools like Frame Averaging and Dual Exposure+ that you can't get anywhere else.

If that's not in your budget, I'd suggest a Sony R-series.

(note my obvious bias in my signature)

Eric Brody

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You've gotten some good advice. The first question is whether you want to or need to leave the Canon system? An lot of folks make some pretty impressive images with Canon, including Art Wolfe. You did not tell us which Canon lenses you have, that might be helpful. You also did not tell us if you print, either yourself or sent out. For many, maximum control of the process from start to finish is very important. Another question is how adept you are at post processing? If not, sit tight, get good at Lightroom and Photoshop and then look around.

If you do consider a system switch, be honest with yourself. Do you really expect a dramatic improvement in image quality (unlikely) or do you just have an itch for something new, nothing wrong with that, I've done it. Do you enjoy a technological challenge, eg new menu system or will it make you crazy? If you already have excellent Canon glass and want to switch to mirrorless (I really can't imagine using a DSLR these days, but I'm not you), will your current lenses work on Canon mirrorless, especially the new one coming. (I've never used Canon so have no knowledge). That will save a bundle as will using the Canon glass on a Sony A7RIII or IV. If you are a serious hiker and weight is important, the Fuji APS-C system, with their best glass will allow excellent prints. I used Fuji before I got a case of megapixel lust and switched to Sony. I made some pretty nice 13x20 prints from carefully exposed and processed Fuji files. If you really want the current best image quality in a mirrorless system that will allow varied types of photography, the Sony A7III (24MP) might be just fine. If you really like detail or have realistic plans for really large prints, the A7RIII or A7RIV are arguably the best image quality on the market. No offense to Doug Peterson, but a Phase One XT is not realistic for most of us.

Rental (I've used Lens Rentals with great results) is a terrific way to try out a new body (and adapter if the Canon lenses can be adapted). I'd highly recommend it before spending large amounts of money especially these days when the traditional relaxed hands on visit to a camera store is challenging.

In any case, good luck with your quest, do let us know what decision you make.

« Last Edit: July 06, 2020, 08:13:28 pm by Eric Brody »
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DP

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Canon lenses + Sony A7R4 dSLM + adapter for Canon lenses ... safe bet because you can always move to Canon dSLM bodies later (once they mature to compete)... or stay w/ Sony
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mistymoon

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Look at the new Canon R5, which should have been released by the time your read this.  Lots of megapixels and a grand array of great lenses.  Probably a game-changer for many.
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BAB

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Seriously you need to shoot a 100mp digital back which leaves you at the choice of used Phase, Hasselblad or new Fuji GFX!
Of course you could shoot film 4x5 or 8x10 Film cameras and lenses right now very affordable, that film equipment and camera coupled with any digital camera using it as your Polaroid will get you to a very happy place fast and easy.

Small modern sensor or should I say newest 40-50mp Sony, Leica and Hasselblad X1D cameras (marketing Gimmicks at best) are great but far from the above mentions for serious landscape Images.

Itís a on going discussion regarding how amazing the small sensor 50mp cameras produce these 40Ē prints that will blow your mind until you see it next to a large sensor image the roll off in the highlights is the first thing you will notice then the detail. With a small investment you can shoot a large sensor or film. That said no sensor produced now Or in years to come will ever match the resolution of the WET PLATE PERIOD.........
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kers

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... That said no sensor produced now Or in years to come will ever match the resolution of the WET PLATE PERIOD.........

Ever made a panorama?  It is so easy, made in seconds - with direct control over the outcome.
... compared to the wet plate period. after the development you need to scan it ... lot of work.. colors are not as good as digital.
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Doug Peterson

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Quote from: Eric Brody link=topic=135452.msg1177849#msg1177849
No offense to Doug Peterson, but a Phase One XT is not realistic for most of us.

No offense taken; I agree! Even for those for whom it's "realistic" (within their budget) it may not be the right choice.

There are lots of good options at nearly every price point.

Gigi

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very difficult to answer for several reasons:
- different cameras can help you, but its an iterative process: you and the camera (as a tool) interact. And its not always predictable how that works out.
- work flow, self-discipline, formal criteria are more important than gear.
- lenses are more important (likely) than the camera
- your own motivation and pursuits are more important than any of the above.

One thing to consider is what are you looking to improve in your work? Its message, its content, or perhaps the output? Are you printing? Using Raw and C1 or LR - maybe some instructional videos to up the quality. Are you in BW or color - consider switching for a while...

And last, are you shooting on a tripod? That may be the single most important element in the whole picture, as it slows you down, makes you think, offers different exposure possibilities, and raises the compositional quality.

Hope this helps. I got into MF digital work years ago, running almost 180ļ from what I thought worked, but was somehow drawn to the quality and the tactile feel of the images. Have been very happy, but it was a quiet voice from inside that advocated for this, nothing predicted.... Hearing that voice takes time and care. Hope this helps.
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Geoff

BobShaw

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I had the 5D2 and it was a great camera in its day, revolutionary even. However its day is long past.
You would be happy with most of the Canon range and 5D4 would give you more of everything and feel just the same and take the same batteries.
There should be good deals on them at the moment since the R5 has been released.

Do you need more megapixels than 30?
If so then you would be better off moving to medium format like an X1D but your wallet will take a hit. However the image quality is a new world.
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Eric Brody

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Lots of great responses to this question from someone who made it his first post. It might be nice to hear back from the OP, just an acknowledgement would be great.
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