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Author Topic: Have all the MF manufacturers fallen asleep (except P1)?  (Read 2133 times)

Joe Towner

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Re: Have all the MF manufacturers fallen asleep (except P1)?
« Reply #20 on: January 14, 2020, 10:57:49 pm »

I see no reason why the new 100MP Sony sensor in the same 44x33mm format requires a bigger body: my guess is that the new Fujifilm GFX100 body is bigger mostly because it adds IS, which adds bulk for both the largest sensor shift mechanism in any cameras so far, and maybe needs more battery bulk to power it too.
My guess is based around the support chips - the horsepower needed to make it feel snappy & work at top speed.  Trade off the battery life & everything else, if the camera is a slug, folks won't be as forgiving as they have been with the X1D.
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BJL

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Re: Have all the MF manufacturers fallen asleep (except P1)?
« Reply #21 on: January 14, 2020, 11:28:00 pm »

My guess is based around the support chips - the horsepower needed to make it feel snappy & work at top speed.  Trade off the battery life & everything else, if the camera is a slug, folks won't be as forgiving as they have been with the X1D.
Maybe, but here’s another speculation: with the emphasis on being relatively small and hand-holdable, Hasselblad (like Fujifilm) thinks the next model needs IBIS, not just more pixels—and that needs work, and a new body design.
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hasselbladfan

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Re: Have all the MF manufacturers fallen asleep (except P1)?
« Reply #22 on: January 15, 2020, 11:44:06 am »

True, I am not a Fujifilmfan, hence my name, though my old B&W enlarger years ago had a Fujinon lens and I still use some of their glass (my HCD lenses).

But I don't like their bodies. They are IMHO so large, so large, so complicated, so ugly. I know it should to matter, but it does (in my case).

Learned a couple of things with this post. Thanks, guys.

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BAB

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Re: Have all the MF manufacturers fallen asleep (except P1)?
« Reply #23 on: January 17, 2020, 07:43:44 pm »

Hasselblad is a strong brand with a history of many parts. It has the opportunity to rejuvenate all of the older lenses and cameras just laying out there with no use by giving them new life with the 907x. This is a grand move on their part. Unfortunately they have become a very passive marketing company that boggles the imagination of all rational photographers. Oh ya the X1D or X1Dii is crippled.


Phase has always been a multi tiered marketing company sell on a pyramid system (lease pricing) excluding cash buyers attracting a very small audiance.


Fuji today has caught the tiger by the tail at the exact right time to ride the market.


Leica missed the boat with the S3?


Funny though on all cameras mentioned above the color science is great!!!!!







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BobShaw

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Re: Have all the MF manufacturers fallen asleep (except P1)?
« Reply #24 on: January 17, 2020, 10:08:31 pm »

Hasselblad is a strong brand with a history of many parts. It has the opportunity to rejuvenate all of the older lenses and cameras just laying out there with no use by giving them new life with the 907x. This is a grand move on their part. Unfortunately they have become a very passive marketing company that boggles the imagination of all rational photographers. Oh ya the X1D or X1Dii is crippled.
What's a rational photographer? To me a criteria is someone who buys a camera to match their needs.
If you buy any medium format camera thinking it is going to be faster to start up or auto focus faster than a 35mm or even your iPhone then you probably should not have bought a medium format camera. It never will.

For what it is worth I have never regarded the X1D (either one) as crippled and it also takes all of those old V series lenses for those with enough nostalgia to pay the price of a small car and then use it for old lenses. It also takes all of the H series lenses. I am very tempted to buy a second from one of the many that sells a camera 6 months old because there is a new one out. I think there are some here that have bought 4 new cameras in less years. Rational?
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ErikKaffehr

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Re: Have all the MF manufacturers fallen asleep (except P1)?
« Reply #25 on: January 18, 2020, 02:08:02 am »

Hasselblad is a strong brand with a history of many parts. It has the opportunity to rejuvenate all of the older lenses and cameras just laying out there with no use by giving them new life with the 907x. This is a grand move on their part. Unfortunately they have become a very passive marketing company that boggles the imagination of all rational photographers. Oh ya the X1D or X1Dii is crippled.


Phase has always been a multi tiered marketing company sell on a pyramid system (lease pricing) excluding cash buyers attracting a very small audiance.


Fuji today has caught the tiger by the tail at the exact right time to ride the market.


Leica missed the boat with the S3?


Funny though on all cameras mentioned above the color science is great!!!!!

Marketing helps little if you have no products to sell...

Best regards
Erik
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BobShaw

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Re: Have all the MF manufacturers fallen asleep (except P1)?
« Reply #26 on: January 18, 2020, 05:53:25 am »

Marketing helps little if you have no products to sell...
If customers are prepared to pay for products months before they are even built who needs marketing help?
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ErikKaffehr

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Re: Have all the MF manufacturers fallen asleep (except P1)?
« Reply #27 on: January 18, 2020, 07:46:00 am »

If customers are prepared to pay for products months before they are even built who needs marketing help?

I guess that customers prepared to pay for products they cannot buy will not create a lot of revenue. A company usually needs revenue to stay alive.

Best regards
Erik
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hubell

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Re: Have all the MF manufacturers fallen asleep (except P1)?
« Reply #28 on: January 18, 2020, 08:33:18 am »

A “rational photographer” is somebody who wants/needs what you want/need and buys what you buy. Of course, we all knew that.

Lust4Life

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Re: Have all the MF manufacturers fallen asleep (except P1)?
« Reply #29 on: January 18, 2020, 10:23:43 am »

OK, I have sat quietly and read for the last couple of days this thread.

The premise of this thread was questioning have all the manufacturers fallen asleep.

My opinion, No, it's not the manufactures of high end true MFD camera that are asleep, it's the vast majority of photographer that are
buying the goods before them at prices beyond the atmosphere of this planet!

When Phase recently suggest I dump well over $60K into their latest iteration of gear "optimized" for landscape work I cringed.
Just how many landscape shooters can recover that before it's of "null" value in the used market?
How many clients will pay the price for a print that allows the shooter to pay for it and extract a decent living?

Certainly not myself, and only two folks that I have known in this lifetime could pull that off today.

I found this one sentence to "haunt" me:
"In that proverbial nutshell: value for money depends on the point of reference from which you are able to make that call."

Agreed, yet in the MFD and MMFD world, this is morphing faster than a cancer cell in Dukes research lab!

As I said in another post, when the Eikonic camera was invented, the writing was on the wall, but few knew how to read it.

Reading the last couple of posts in a thread this morning brought back a distinct memory that popped out of my "little gray cells".

"Photography" has changed so dramatically in my lifetime, and the role of the truly professional photographer and especially the fine art photographer have morphed radically. 

Since my days with Eikonic, I have tried to “bite my tongue” for years and just watch the evolution but I can no longer!  The straw that broke the back of silence, other than among a few close friends, was the tool from Luminar for sky replacement!!!  Many four letter words can describe how I feel about that manifestation of all my fears back in the Eikonix days!!  It's happened!

We no longer need to be patient folks that sit sometimes for hours or return to the same spot day after day for the "right light", or the wind to quit, the right "clouds" or right action from the subject of interest to manifest.

Just push a button and you put in the sky of your choosing!

Eliot Porter, Galen Rowell have got to be cursing at us and what our definition of a Professional/Fine Art has turned into.

I’m sorry to say that photography as a whole has morphed from "fine art" to "POP Art" in so many ways.  Andy Warhol has got to be laughing

Galleries showing "Smart Phone" images are art, what a transition!

But that is the times we all live in now.

My Grandson is 24, lives in Atlanta and has been infested with the "visualization" virus.  He IS selling his video works and already making a decent living at it.  He is using ALL of the tools before him and has none of the "romantic notion" that mega pixels and mega bucks destine one for success!  He purchases only what the market before him requires! 

Guess what, MFD is not a requirement by any stretch of the mind, and he is making good money!

I was having an interesting exchange with Carol recently, the founder of Gallery West in Carmel, who has a history of representing some of the finest photographers in the world.  She still will not take any artists work that is not still working in the "wet" world. 

A close friend of mine sells his huge landscape images for over $100K each to worldwide clients and today mixes his work with "wet" and digital.  He's not accepted in her gallery as some of his work is now being done digitally.  I have to respect her commitment to the traditional f.64 premise but admit I'm happy to no longer be breathing in the fumes from darkroom trays with Pyrogallic Acid or Amidol swishing around in them - carcinogens, but they got you the "blacks" we all wanted.

Just how many of us can actually recoup the investment in the top of the line Phase or Hasselblad H in the 2.5 year period before it is marginalized by new developments OR youngsters like my Grandson come along with a MMF (Mini Medium Format) Fuji GFX and takes the client away from you on price and work that is "good enough"?

Thus, those of us buying into a top of the line Phase or Hassie, etc. system today are clearly dancing with a dinosaur in my opinion.  Yes, a dinosaur with a sexy "hook" of MP's and the appeal of a Bentley, but still a dinosaur.

There, Now I feel better.

« Last Edit: January 18, 2020, 01:53:41 pm by Lust4Life »
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Jack

BJL

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907x with CFV II 50C vs X1D, and rational choice
« Reply #30 on: January 18, 2020, 12:26:30 pm »

Hasselblad ... has the opportunity to rejuvenate all of the older lenses and cameras just laying out there with no use by giving them new life with the 907x. ... Unfortunately they have become a very passive marketing company that boggles the imagination of all rational photographers.
Firstly, a bit of market reality: striving to enable people to keep using decades-old lenses is not a rational business approach, especially for a relatively small company like Hasselblad that is trying to keep up with rapid changes and the encroachments of giants like Fujifilm (directly in 44x33) and Canon, Nikon and Sony (with more rapid sensor and other technological advances arguably offsetting a lot of Hasselblad's format size advantage).

Secondly, can you give a rational argument for a 907x with its matching CFV II 50C 44x33 back over an X1D II? They have the same sensor and lens mount, and the same ability to use other lenses via adaptors, so the differences I know of are:

Favoring the 907x with CFV II 50C:
1) The back can also be used with an old classic Hasselblad "V system" body.
2) Looks are more esthetically compatible with those classic V system bodies and lenses?
3) ADDED Tiltable screen for easier waist level or short tripod usage. (Tip of the hat to Joe Towner)

Favoring the X1D:
1) EVF as an alternative to the rear-screen (so you do not have to "use it held out at arm's length", as some anti-rear-screen zealots keep claiming!)
2) Lower price (at least based on the "907X Special Edition" pricing we have so far).
3) Lower weight.
4) Better ergonomics for hand-held usage.
5) Looks are more esthetically compatible with X system (and H system) lenses?
« Last Edit: January 18, 2020, 05:33:58 pm by BJL »
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michaelclark

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Re: Have all the MF manufacturers fallen asleep (except P1)?
« Reply #31 on: January 18, 2020, 01:36:43 pm »

Well said!

OK, I have sat quietly and read for the last couple of days this thread.

The premise of this thread was questioning have all the manufacturers fallen asleep.

My opinion, No, it's not the manufactures of high end true MFD camera that are asleep, it's the vast majority of photographer that are
buying the goods before them at prices beyond the atmosphere of this planet!

When Phase recently suggest I dump well over $60K into their latest iteration of gear "optimized" for landscape work I cringed.
Just how many landscape shooters can recover that before it's of "null" value in the used market?
How many clients will pay the price for a print that allows the shooter to pay for it and extract a decent living?

Certainly not myself, and only two folks that I have known in this lifetime could pull that off today.

I found this one sentence to "haunt" me:
"In that proverbial nutshell: value for money depends on the point of reference from which you are able to make that call."

Agreed, yet in the MFD and MMFD world, this is morphing faster than a cancer cell in Dukes research lab!

As I said in another post, when the Eikonic camera was invented, the writing was on the wall, but few knew how to read it.

Reading the last couple of posts in a thread this morning brought back a distinct memory that popped out of my "little gray cells".

"Photography" has changed so dramatically in my lifetime, and the role of the truly professional photographer and especially the fine art photographer have morphed radically. 

I have tried to “bite my tongue” for years and just watch the evolution but I can no longer!  The straw that broke the back of silence, other than among a few close friends, was the tool from Luminar for sky replacement!!!  Many four letter words can describe how I feel about that manifestation of all my fears back in the Eikonix days!!  It's happened!

We no longer need to be patient folks that sit sometimes for hours for the "right light", or the wind to quit, or right action from the subject of interest to manifest.

Just push a button and you put in the sky of your choosing!

Eliot Porter, Galen Rowell have got to be cursing at us and what our definition of a Professional/Fine Art has turned into.

I’m sorry to say that photography as a whole has morphed from "fine art" to "POP Art" in so many ways.  Andy Warhol has got to be laughing

Galleries showing "Smart Phone" images are art, what a transition!

But that is the times we all live in now.

My Grandson is 24, lives in Atlanta and has been infested with the "visualization" virus.  He IS selling his video works and already making a decent living at it.  He is using ALL of the tools before him and has none of the "romantic notion" that mega pixels and mega bucks bucks destine one for success!  He purchases only what the market before him requires! 

Guess what, MFD is not a requirement by any stretch of the mind, and he is making good money!

I was having an interesting exchange with Carol recently, the founder of Gallery West in Carmel, who has a history of representing some of the finest photographers in the world.  She still will not take any artists work that is not still working in the "wet" world. 

A close friend of mine sells his huge landscape images for over $100K each to worldwide clients and mixes his work with "wet" and digital. 
He's not accepted in her gallery as some of his work is now being done digitally.  I have to respect her commitment to the traditional f.64 premise but admit I'm happy to no longer be breathing in the fumes from darkroom trays with Pyrogallic Acid or Amidol swishing around in them - carcinogens, but they got you the "blacks" we all wanted.

Just how many of us can actually recoup the investment in the top of the line Phase or Hasselblad H in the 2.5 year period before it is marginalized by new developments OR youngsters like my Grandson come along with a MMF (Mini Medium Format) Fuji GFX and takes the client away from you on price and work that is "good enough"?

Thus, those of us buying into a top of the line Phase or Hassie, etc. system today are clearly dancing with a dinosaur in my opinion.  Yes, a dinosaur with a sexy "hook" of MP's and the appeal of a Bentley, but still a dinosaur.

There, Now I feel better.
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Rob C

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Re: Have all the MF manufacturers fallen asleep (except P1)?
« Reply #32 on: January 18, 2020, 02:04:06 pm »

OK, I have sat quietly and read for the last couple of days this thread.

The premise of this thread was questioning have all the manufacturers fallen asleep.

My opinion, No, it's not the manufactures of high end true MFD camera that are asleep, it's the vast majority of photographer that are
buying the goods before them at prices beyond the atmosphere of this planet!

When Phase recently suggest I dump well over $60K into their latest iteration of gear "optimized" for landscape work I cringed.
Just how many landscape shooters can recover that before it's of "null" value in the used market?
How many clients will pay the price for a print that allows the shooter to pay for it and extract a decent living?

Certainly not myself, and only two folks that I have known in this lifetime could pull that off today.

I found this one sentence to "haunt" me:
"In that proverbial nutshell: value for money depends on the point of reference from which you are able to make that call."

Agreed, yet in the MFD and MMFD world, this is morphing faster than a cancer cell in Dukes research lab!

As I said in another post, when the Eikonic camera was invented, the writing was on the wall, but few knew how to read it.

Reading the last couple of posts in a thread this morning brought back a distinct memory that popped out of my "little gray cells".

"Photography" has changed so dramatically in my lifetime, and the role of the truly professional photographer and especially the fine art photographer have morphed radically. 

I have tried to “bite my tongue” for years and just watch the evolution but I can no longer!  The straw that broke the back of silence, other than among a few close friends, was the tool from Luminar for sky replacement!!!  Many four letter words can describe how I feel about that manifestation of all my fears back in the Eikonix days!!  It's happened!

We no longer need to be patient folks that sit sometimes for hours for the "right light", or the wind to quit, or right action from the subject of interest to manifest.

Just push a button and you put in the sky of your choosing!

Eliot Porter, Galen Rowell have got to be cursing at us and what our definition of a Professional/Fine Art has turned into.

I’m sorry to say that photography as a whole has morphed from "fine art" to "POP Art" in so many ways.  Andy Warhol has got to be laughing

Galleries showing "Smart Phone" images are art, what a transition!

But that is the times we all live in now.

My Grandson is 24, lives in Atlanta and has been infested with the "visualization" virus.  He IS selling his video works and already making a decent living at it.  He is using ALL of the tools before him and has none of the "romantic notion" that mega pixels and mega bucks bucks destine one for success!  He purchases only what the market before him requires! 

Guess what, MFD is not a requirement by any stretch of the mind, and he is making good money!

I was having an interesting exchange with Carol recently, the founder of Gallery West in Carmel, who has a history of representing some of the finest photographers in the world.  She still will not take any artists work that is not still working in the "wet" world. 

A close friend of mine sells his huge landscape images for over $100K each to worldwide clients and mixes his work with "wet" and digital. 
He's not accepted in her gallery as some of his work is now being done digitally.  I have to respect her commitment to the traditional f.64 premise but admit I'm happy to no longer be breathing in the fumes from darkroom trays with Pyrogallic Acid or Amidol swishing around in them - carcinogens, but they got you the "blacks" we all wanted.

Just how many of us can actually recoup the investment in the top of the line Phase or Hasselblad H in the 2.5 year period before it is marginalized by new developments OR youngsters like my Grandson come along with a MMF (Mini Medium Format) Fuji GFX and takes the client away from you on price and work that is "good enough"?

Thus, those of us buying into a top of the line Phase or Hassie, etc. system today are clearly dancing with a dinosaur in my opinion.  Yes, a dinosaur with a sexy "hook" of MP's and the appeal of a Bentley, but still a dinosaur.

There, Now I feel better.

" I found this one sentence to "haunt" me:
"In that proverbial nutshell: value for money depends on the point of reference from which you are able to make that call." "

I didn't mean to spook anyone, but it's simply how life works.

I have discovered the Jay Leno Garage set of online videos, and there you see the perfect example of how value becomes absolutely relative to ability to pay. It puts everything material in life into perfect perspective.

Yesterday's Euromillions Lottery prize of over one hundred million euros went to one ticket holder. As the guy in the shop mentioned this afternoon when I bought my next ticket: any young guy under thirty winning that has just had his life ruined. I agree. It can destroy both appreciation and perspective, not to mention create the additional damage of never again knowing if it's you or your money that the friends you currently have, and the new ones waiting in line will find to be the attraction.

When you are a lot older, you think of your next-in-line and also the additional good your motherload can do for mankind.

Rob

Lust4Life

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Re: Have all the MF manufacturers fallen asleep (except P1)?
« Reply #33 on: January 18, 2020, 02:12:47 pm »

You say:
"Favoring the X1D:
1) EVF as an alternative to the rear-screen (so you do not have to "use it held out at arm's length", as some anti-rear-screen zealots keep claiming!)
2) Lower price (at least based on the "907X Special Edition" pricing we have so far).
3) Lower weight.
4) Better ergonomics for hand-held usage.
5) Looks are more esthetically compatible with X system (and H system) lenses?"

I suggest taking the evaluation a step further:
           Fuji   
           GFX 50S   
Sensor:        51.4 MP, 43.8x32.9   
           CMOS   
Max Resolution:     8256x6192   
Sensor Size:     43.8x32.9   
Dynamic Range:  14 Stops   
Reported Bits:     14 RAW   
True sensor  Bits: 14 RAW   
Sensor Cleaning Syst.:  Ultra Sonic Vibration   
Weight in Pounds:  2   32.45oz w/Battery+EVF+SD
             920g/2lb   EVF, Battery, card.
             740g/26.10oz   w/o
Body Price:       $4,995.00   

Lenses for basic Setup:   Fuji recent Sale price
Wide Angle         23mm f/4   $2,099
Weight                 1.9   
            
Medium  Zoom         32-64mm f/4   $1,799.00
Weight                 1.9   
            
Portrait                100-200 f/2   $1,500
Weight                2.2   
            
         Fuji GFX 50s System Cost w/23+100-200 zoom:   $8,594.00
         Fuji GFX 50s Total Weight w/23mm+ 100-200:   6.1
            
         Fuji GFX 50s System Cost w/23+34-64:   $8,893.00
         Fuji GFX 50s Total Weight w/24mm+ 32-64:   5.8
            
         Fuji GFX 50s System Cost w/23mm+32-64mm+100-200mm zoom:  $10,393.00
         Fuji GFX 50s Total Weight w/all lenses:  8
            
         Image Stabilization available is certain lenses.   

------------------

      Hasselblad      
      X1DII      
      51.4 MP 43.8x32.9 (identical to Fuji GFX 50S in all respects)      
      CMOS      
      8272 x 6200      
      43.8x32.9      
      14 Stops (*)      
      16 RAW - sensor can only gen 14 bits so in camera up-res applied!      
      14 bits true RAW      
      NO      
      1.77   with battery & card   
            
            
      $5,750.00      
            
      Hasselblad XCD      
      21mm f/4   $3,750   
      1.32      
            
      35-75mm f3.5-4.5   $5,175   
      2.46      
            
      120mm f3.5   $4,495   
      2.14      
            
      System Cost:   $19,170.00   
      Total Weight:   7.69   

                  
      * 14 bits true converted to 16 in camera      
      Hasselblad Natural Colour Solution (HNCS)      
      Impression:  No Image Stabilization in body or lenses.   

Transparency:  I have shot Hasselblad film and digital all of my life BUT the above "equation" is so overwhelming in my
mind that I now have the above GFX configuration on my back when out shooting.

Back when I had a lot of hair on top of this critter, I remarked to a best friend when I was consulting with Nikon and Hasselblad
about the development of each of their first digital cameras:  The Japanese can't get enough of your thoughts and the folks in
Sweden are intimidated by anything that is "NIH" (Not invented here).

Again, that was the weakness of Hassie.  I saw exactly the same with Silicon Graphics/Cray when my team was developing on those platforms.     


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Jack

Joe Towner

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Re: Have all the MF manufacturers fallen asleep (except P1)?
« Reply #34 on: January 18, 2020, 02:14:03 pm »

To add to the list from BJL, CFV II + 907x has waist level screen positioning (tilted screen).

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Lust4Life

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Re: Have all the MF manufacturers fallen asleep (except P1)?
« Reply #35 on: January 18, 2020, 02:28:39 pm »

To add to the list from BJL, CFV II + 907x has waist level screen positioning (tilted screen).

I must admit, for Xmas I bought myself the GFX Tilt EVF device.  I have surprised myself that I
have made it a permanent part of my camera.  I was out shooting yesterday and it allowed me to point
the viewfinder straight up, drop my tripod height to change the FOV and use it a wee bit like the Hassie 500cm waist level viewfinder. 
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Re: Have all the MF manufacturers fallen asleep (except P1)?
« Reply #36 on: January 18, 2020, 04:19:24 pm »

Sorry, but at a time when we have the first 100 MP MF body, with IBIS and modern AF, with solid glass and smart accessories like the EVF tilt adapter, with all the perks of the mirrorless tech, at a fraction of the cost of traditional MF ... it seems like all MF manufacturesrs are asleep at the wheel, except Fuji.
While leaf shutter lenses exist only adapted and with manual focus, and tech lenses are limited to adapted third party tilt-shift lenses, the GF system is the one leading into the future - all snobbery aside, camera ecosystems are just tools for creating images. And currently Fuji opened up many more possibilities for image creation (stabilization, EVF, eye-af etc.) for a lot more creators, with the significanly lower entry price.
I wish I had the XT / Rodenatock possibilities with Fuji, or AF leaf shutter lenses - but hey, I simply can’t afford 4x the cost of my current GFX 100 setup for that. And had the GFX 100 not showed up, with it’s combination of high MP count, solid & affordable lenses, and fast operation (again, stabilization, modern AF, EVF) I would still be shooting 35mm.
« Last Edit: January 19, 2020, 03:07:41 am by nazdravanul »
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BJL

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Have all the MF manufacturers fallen asleep, except Fujifilm and P1?
« Reply #37 on: January 18, 2020, 05:52:17 pm »

To add to the list from BJL, CFV II + 907x has waist level screen positioning (tilted screen).
Thanks; I added it.  A bad oversight for me as a lover of the waist-level option for situations like maintain eye contact and interaction with human subjects, and getting eye-level perspective with children without the possibly off-putting act of kneeling.

To keep with the desire to use Hasselblad V lenses, I omitted mention of the extra VF options that Fujifilm G cameras offer. Those come in exchange for the loss of leaf-shutter lenses and so the bulkier bodies and lower flash sync speeds that go with a big focal plane shutter.
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BJL

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what is the Eikonic camera?
« Reply #38 on: January 19, 2020, 03:21:20 pm »

As I said in another post, when the Eikonic camera was invented, the writing was on the wall, but few knew how to read it.

My knowledge and Google have both failed me: what is the Eikonic camera?
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Lust4Life

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Re: what is the Eikonic camera?
« Reply #39 on: January 19, 2020, 04:03:19 pm »

My knowledge and Google have both failed me: what is the Eikonic camera?

And your a fellow Senior member???   LOL!

OK, it was a group of chaps out of MIT headed by a very nice man named George Helms.
I'm 6'4" and George made me feel short - he was about 6'7"!

Here is a little info on the initial version that I consulted on.  Now remember, much of what can be found is from the Kodak days.  But the real work was done before they brought out the company (exempting Sasson's initial invention.  I remember a meeting with the VP or Kodak Digital at a Siggraph convention.  They had the device for a couple of years and were terrible at improving it or marketing it.  I was pissed and told him that his division of Kodak could run a virgin through death row and she'd come out a virgin on the other side!  Naturally, I've never been good at holding back my thoughts, especially when I knew they were valid:

EIKONIX- 1982.   Eikonix Corporation marketed the first digital filming instrument.  It had a 3000 pixel scanner which moved across 4000 lines to provide a 12MP image.  First images were shades of grey, but later red, blue and green filters were added resulting in the first digital color film.  We believe we were the first digital camera history web site to provide a photo and information concerning this camera.

As I said somewhere else on the forum, clean and consistent electrical current was a huge problem in getting a quality scan out of it.

My group wrote some code to run it:  Run 3 scans of a static scene, one through a red, then green then blue filter and composite it into
a image file.

It was similar to the logic that later appeared in Management Graphics (MGI), headed by Jim Teeter, film recorder that my team developed
drivers from on the SGI platform over the SCSI pipe.
 
MGI applied the inverse of the Eikonic capture device/camera - shoot to a piece of color film (we had drivers that ran the cine film recorders in Tri-Star, Columbia, etc studios)
though each of the RGB filters and there you have a frame on the film from a computer generated file.  We'd take about 28 seconds
as I recall to dump a frame of digital data to a frame of Kodak Cine film.

I could not find much on the net:
http://www.cameramuseum.ch/en/N5880/la-revolution-numerique-en.html?M=7588

Attached is a photo of the earlier unit, again after Kodak took over.

Here is what a later version of it after Kodak bought the company and patents looked like:
http://www.peterjsucy.com/History/1988/EikonixBrochure.pdf

In short, to my knowledge it was the first real commercial digital camera after Sasson's invention/2MP device at Kodak.

I often ponder why there is so little info on the machine and the crew that invented it to be found on the
internet.  Some time back I tried to find info on George but could not come up with much.

It certainly was an exciting time, yet as I said a few posts back, it troubled me about the future of "Fine Art Photography"

Jack



« Last Edit: January 19, 2020, 04:07:58 pm by Lust4Life »
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