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Author Topic: Choice of illuminant value in calibrating/profiling a monitor?  (Read 455 times)

gkroeger

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Choice of illuminant value in calibrating/profiling a monitor?
« on: January 10, 2020, 12:30:21 am »

I have an NEC monitor with Spectraview II software and matching NEC colorimeter.  The software suggests a default value of D65 when setting the monitor up for photo editing. Is there a good reason for that?  Even though I soft proof before printing, would it be better to choose something closer to the typical color temperature under which the prints will be viewed? 
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digitaldog

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Re: Choice of illuminant value in calibrating/profiling a monitor?
« Reply #1 on: January 10, 2020, 09:15:28 am »

It's only a good value if it results in a match and not so much if it doesn't. IOW it's a default starting point only.
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Andrew Rodney
Author “Color Management for Photographers"

Frans Waterlander

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Re: Choice of illuminant value in calibrating/profiling a monitor?
« Reply #2 on: January 10, 2020, 12:37:03 pm »

It depends on what you want to do with your images.
For printing, you want the best possible match between the image on the monitor and the print viewed under your viewing conditions. That way you know that your editing steps will be shown truthfully in your prints. Color constancy causes that print to look good under almost all other viewing conditions. So adjust both the color temperature and the brightness of your monitor to match your prints.
For use on the internet, all bets are off, because most people don't calibrate their monitor. D65 would be a good choice.
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digitaldog

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Re: Choice of illuminant value in calibrating/profiling a monitor?
« Reply #3 on: January 10, 2020, 12:42:56 pm »

For use on the internet, all bets are off, because most people don't calibrate their monitor. D65 would be a good choice.
And of course, a color managed browser would be ideal, then you could view ANY image on the web that’s got a tag indicating it’s color space.



sRGB urban legend & myths Part 2
In this 17 minute video, I'll discuss some more sRGB misinformation and cover:
When to use sRGB and what to expect on the web and mobile devices
How sRGB doesn't insure a visual match without color management, how to check
The downsides of an all sRGB workflow
sRGB's color gamut vs. "professional" output devices
The future of sRGB and wide gamut display technology
Photo print labs that demand sRGB for output
High resolution: http://digitaldog.net/files/sRGBMythsPart2.mp4
Low resolution on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WyvVUL1gWVs

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Andrew Rodney
Author “Color Management for Photographers"
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