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Author Topic: Bert Stern  (Read 507 times)

Rob C

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Bert Stern
« on: August 19, 2019, 10:59:16 am »

I may have posted this particular link before, but anyway:

 https://time.com/69186/bert-stern-the-original-mad-man/

Loved the guy's way. The movie was available online for a time, but then vanished behind dollar signs.

Couldn't resist Russ' favourite shibboleth hate:

https://www.plazzart.com/en_AS/buy/photography/bert-stern-kate-moss-laying-down-388093
« Last Edit: August 19, 2019, 11:21:58 am by Rob C »
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KLaban

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Re: Bert Stern
« Reply #1 on: August 19, 2019, 11:55:56 am »

Richard Hamilton, My Marilyn 1966.

My Marilyn, 1966
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Rob C

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Re: Bert Stern
« Reply #2 on: August 19, 2019, 01:54:40 pm »

Richard Hamilton, My Marilyn 1966.

My Marilyn, 1966


Interesting, but also raises many questions about art, whose art, coyright and building a name off the back of somebody else.

Once or twice or perhaps more often, I feel obliged to shoot a street snap of a shop window display where some model features strongly in a perfume ad or such; I never feel entirely comfortable about that, but shoot anyway as there is no commercial rip off. However, it still makes me feel that I'm stealing somebody else's talent...

What do you feel about such instances?

Rob

petermfiore

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Re: Bert Stern
« Reply #3 on: August 19, 2019, 02:01:23 pm »


Interesting, but also raises many questions about art, whose art, coyright and building a name off the back of somebody else.

Once or twice or perhaps more often, I feel obliged to shoot a street snap of a shop window display where some model features strongly in a perfume ad or such; I never feel entirely comfortable about that, but shoot anyway as there is no commercial rip off. However, it still makes me feel that I'm stealing somebody else's talent...

What do you feel about such instances?

Rob

I would never do that when I was doing Illustration, for ethical reasons...As a painter I still don't. Only because what I do today, for me, is very personal. Not for ethical reasons.

Peter
« Last Edit: August 19, 2019, 02:22:37 pm by petermfiore »
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KLaban

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Re: Bert Stern
« Reply #4 on: August 19, 2019, 03:51:01 pm »


Interesting, but also raises many questions about art, whose art, coyright and building a name off the back of somebody else.

Once or twice or perhaps more often, I feel obliged to shoot a street snap of a shop window display where some model features strongly in a perfume ad or such; I never feel entirely comfortable about that, but shoot anyway as there is no commercial rip off. However, it still makes me feel that I'm stealing somebody else's talent...

What do you feel about such instances?

Rob

Richard Hamilton, Father of Pop Art.

It is quite simply the raison d'Ítre of the Pop Art movement and Hamilton considered its father.
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KLaban

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Re: Bert Stern
« Reply #5 on: August 19, 2019, 05:03:37 pm »

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KLaban

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Re: Bert Stern
« Reply #6 on: August 20, 2019, 03:52:47 am »

I should add that if Hamilton was the Father of Pop Art then perhaps Warhol was its most famous son.

Pop Art was of course a celebration of popular culture and iconography and as such much of the imagery was 'borrowed'. It was also, for me as a young man, my passion, my inspiration and the subject of my thesis.
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Rob C

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Re: Bert Stern
« Reply #7 on: August 20, 2019, 07:37:55 am »

I should add that if Hamilton was the Father of Pop Art then perhaps Warhol was its most famous son.

Pop Art was of course a celebration of popular culture and iconography and as such much of the imagery was 'borrowed'. It was also, for me as a young man, my passion, my inspiration and the subject of my thesis.


Yes, i understand that; I think you linked me to Hamilton quite some time ago. Reading what you've just written, it becomes interesting to see where the adult you went, which seems to be in far more traditional lines. I wonder whether that comes from commercial life and its demands, or just a change of heart and less personal interest in the field?

For myself, I seem to have been stuck in the same mindset from the start, the only difference between mindset and work done being opportunity to do what took me into this fine mess in the first instance.

:-)

petermfiore

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Re: Bert Stern
« Reply #8 on: August 20, 2019, 07:38:17 am »

I beg to differ...I would say Stuart Davis was the man that ushered in Pop Art. That's the way I learned it.

https://www.phaidon.com/agenda/art/articles/2016/july/27/stuart-davis-proto-pop-artist-or-modernist-master/


Peter

KLaban

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Re: Bert Stern
« Reply #9 on: August 20, 2019, 07:47:02 am »


Yes, i understand that; I think you linked me to Hamilton quite some time ago. Reading what you've just written, it becomes interesting to see where the adult you went, which seems to be in far more traditional lines. I wonder whether that comes from commercial life and its demands, or just a change of heart and less personal interest in the field?

For myself, I seem to have been stuck in the same mindset from the start, the only difference between mindset and work done being opportunity to do what took me into this fine mess in the first instance.

:-)

Rob, nothing has changed, what I did to earn a buck had/has no bearing on what I admired/admire in painters, which as it happens has always been rather eclectic. I'll add that photographers and photography have always been secondary.   
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KLaban

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Re: Bert Stern
« Reply #10 on: August 20, 2019, 07:49:09 am »

I beg to differ...I would say Stuart Davis was the man that ushered in Pop Art. That's the way I learned it.

https://www.phaidon.com/agenda/art/articles/2016/july/27/stuart-davis-proto-pop-artist-or-modernist-master/


Peter

Peter, I imagine there was a degree of nationalistic prejudice involved.

;-)
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petermfiore

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Re: Bert Stern
« Reply #11 on: August 20, 2019, 07:53:02 am »

Peter, I imagine there was a degree of nationalistic prejudice involved.

;-)

Just look at the dates....LOL

Rob C

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Re: Bert Stern
« Reply #12 on: August 20, 2019, 02:28:16 pm »

I beg to differ...I would say Stuart Davis was the man that ushered in Pop Art. That's the way I learned it.

https://www.phaidon.com/agenda/art/articles/2016/july/27/stuart-davis-proto-pop-artist-or-modernist-master/


Peter


His Lucky Strike painting reminds me strongly of the thinking behind a lot of Saul Leiter's street colour work; much the same concern with motifs such as bits of advertising material. Leiter himself raises Bonnard more than other painters, if my memory isn't deceiving me right now.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=p9y_F7PSGss

Wish I'd been able to go to art school back in my youth. Oh well, can't have it all.

:-(
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