Pages: 1 ... 3 4 [5] 6 7 ... 113   Go Down

Author Topic: Extreme weather  (Read 54408 times)

Rob C

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 24074
Re: Extreme weather
« Reply #80 on: July 14, 2019, 10:45:30 am »

Man adapts and will learn to deal with climate change as they always have.  So will other species.  The polar bear will turn brown as it again forages on land for food. etc.

No; they become extinct.

Rob

Alan Klein

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Online Online
  • Posts: 10688
    • Flicker photos
Re: Extreme weather
« Reply #81 on: July 14, 2019, 11:37:14 am »

No; they become extinct.

Rob
Species adapt as the weather shifts.  If the area expands, their range expands.  If the area shrinks, they move on or adapt.
 Some adapt in other creating new species and modifications of existing species. 

Do you really think man is going to disappear because of weather changes?  There will be inconveniences in local areas.  People will farm ducks instead of chickens.  But the world will go on. 

Jeremy Roussak

  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 8727
    • site
Re: Extreme weather
« Reply #82 on: July 14, 2019, 02:38:16 pm »

No; they become extinct.

Some do, some don't. Look at the history of the peppered moth.

Jeremy
Logged

Frans Waterlander

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 530
Re: Extreme weather
« Reply #83 on: July 14, 2019, 03:36:02 pm »

No; they become extinct.

Rob

The polar bears survived the Medieval Warm Period, 900-1300 AD, which was warmer than today.
Logged

Bart_van_der_Wolf

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 8847
Re: Extreme weather
« Reply #84 on: July 14, 2019, 04:20:43 pm »

The polar bears survived the Medieval Warm Period, 900-1300 AD, which was warmer than today.



Not quite, it's globally warmer today, and even more in the Northern hemisphere.

And some more info:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CY4Yecsx_-s

Cheers,
Bart
« Last Edit: July 14, 2019, 04:32:49 pm by Bart_van_der_Wolf »
Logged
== If you do what you did, you'll get what you got. ==

Rob C

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 24074
Re: Extreme weather
« Reply #85 on: July 14, 2019, 05:16:26 pm »

Some do, some don't. Look at the history of the peppered moth.

Jeremy


Jeremy, tell me you are joking. It's 23:16 as I type!

Rob

Rob C

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 24074
Re: Extreme weather
« Reply #86 on: July 14, 2019, 05:18:10 pm »

Species adapt as the weather shifts.  If the area expands, their range expands.  If the area shrinks, they move on or adapt.
 Some adapt in other creating new species and modifications of existing species. 

Do you really think man is going to disappear because of weather changes?  There will be inconveniences in local areas.  People will farm ducks instead of chickens.  But the world will go on.


Yes, we agree: there will be inconveniences. I love understatement.

Rob

Alan Klein

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Online Online
  • Posts: 10688
    • Flicker photos
Re: Extreme weather
« Reply #87 on: July 14, 2019, 05:24:43 pm »


Yes, we agree: there will be inconveniences. I love understatement.

Rob
li
Cutting back on fossil fuels will also cause inconveniences. Cheap fuel like coal and gas allows people to keep warm. Without that fuel they freeze to death. It's the other side of the coin that you have to pay attention to also.

Rob C

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 24074
Re: Extreme weather
« Reply #88 on: July 14, 2019, 05:35:12 pm »

li
Cutting back on fossil fuels will also cause inconveniences. Cheap fuel like coal and gas allows people to keep warm. Without that fuel they freeze to death. It's the other side of the coin that you have to pay attention to also.


That's some coin you've got there: so far, it has revealed several sides to itself and the week has just begun!

Go, daddy go!

:-)

RSL

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Online Online
  • Posts: 14729
    • http://www.russ-lewis.com
Re: Extreme weather
« Reply #89 on: July 14, 2019, 07:57:19 pm »



Not quite, it's globally warmer today, and even more in the Northern hemisphere.

And some more info:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CY4Yecsx_-s

Cheers,
Bart

You need to find a cave to move into, Bart. Caves are cooler.
Logged
Russ Lewis  www.russ-lewis.com.

JoeKitchen

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 4378
Re: Extreme weather
« Reply #90 on: July 14, 2019, 09:11:09 pm »



Not quite, it's globally warmer today, and even more in the Northern hemisphere.

And some more info:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CY4Yecsx_-s

Cheers,
Bart

Just like map, reading a graph without a key is pretty annoying.  Could you please tell us what the different colors represent? 
« Last Edit: July 14, 2019, 09:26:58 pm by JoeKitchen »
Logged
"Photography is one percent inspiration and ninety-nine percent

Bart_van_der_Wolf

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 8847
Re: Extreme weather
« Reply #91 on: July 14, 2019, 09:23:59 pm »

Just like map, reading a graph without a key is pretty annoying.  Could you please tell us with the different colors represent?

Hi Joe,

Reconstructions from different sources/locations in the Northern Hemisphere, tree-rings, sediment layers, altitudes with certain seeds, isotopes, etc.. The black line is actual recordings with instrumentation (thermometers).
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medieval_Warm_Period

Cheers,
Bart
Logged
== If you do what you did, you'll get what you got. ==

LesPalenik

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Online Online
  • Posts: 4023
    • advantica blog
Re: Extreme weather
« Reply #92 on: July 14, 2019, 09:26:45 pm »

Hi Joe,

Reconstructions from different sources/locations in the Northern Hemisphere, tree-rings, sediment layers, altitudes with certain seeds, isotopes, etc.. The black line is actual recordings with instrumentation (thermometers).
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medieval_Warm_Period

Cheers,
Bart

The black line (absolute temperature) is what counts.
Logged

JoeKitchen

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 4378
Re: Extreme weather
« Reply #93 on: July 14, 2019, 09:37:49 pm »

Hi Joe,

Reconstructions from different sources/locations in the Northern Hemisphere, tree-rings, sediment layers, altitudes with certain seeds, isotopes, etc.. The black line is actual recordings with instrumentation (thermometers).
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medieval_Warm_Period

Cheers,
Bart

Thanks!  It appears like those who posted it don't even supply the key though, or at least post it with the graph. 
Logged
"Photography is one percent inspiration and ninety-nine percent

Alan Klein

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Online Online
  • Posts: 10688
    • Flicker photos
Re: Extreme weather
« Reply #94 on: July 14, 2019, 10:00:58 pm »

The black line (absolute temperature) is what counts.


Les,  Warm is good.  Isn't it?  After all, you're Canadian.  Wouldn't you like a little warmer winters?  You wouldn't have to vacation in FLorida which is suppose to be going under anyway.  You'll be able to catch some sun rays on the St. Lawrence  and save all that air fare money. 

LesPalenik

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Online Online
  • Posts: 4023
    • advantica blog
Re: Extreme weather
« Reply #95 on: July 14, 2019, 10:58:29 pm »

Les,  Warm is good.  Isn't it?  After all, you're Canadian.  Wouldn't you like a little warmer winters?  You wouldn't have to vacation in FLorida which is suppose to be going under anyway.  You'll be able to catch some sun rays on the St. Lawrence  and save all that air fare money.

The primary beneficiary of warmer weather will be Iceland. All tourists complaining of bitterly cold winds and heavy snowfalls on the roads there can breath out now. Just imagine how many more photographers will come if they'll promise milder weather and more passable roads.
 
https://icelandmag.is/article/winter-2016-17-was-fourth-warmest-winter-record

When it comes to the warming trend and Canadian winters, 2 degrees difference won't cut it, we might just get the NJ climate. Still too cold for swimming in Lake Superior or Atlantic ocean, and no fresh mangoes as in Florida.

Right now, we are having another hot summer here. The air and water temperatures in southern Ontario are now pretty much the same as in southern Florida. For this coming week, the Toronto forecast calls for up to 32C (90F) temperatures, with Humidex reaching 43C (109F). Too hot for me and all dogs in our neighbourhood.

It seems that because of wet spring and now hot summer we have more mosquitos this year and also the ticks have started to migrate from south, but so far no dangerous creatures and no stinking seaweeds in the lakes. A week ago, I took my canoe to a scenic river north of Toronto, and while on the water and in the sun the paddle and swim were very enjoyable, upon the return to the take-out spot and while strapping the canoe on the car, the copious and voracious mosquitos spoiled all the fun from an otherwise fine outing.   

Quote
“We’re warning residents that the mosquitos are on their way and [some] have arrived this past weekend,” said Russell Eirich, Regina city’s senior program manager for forestry, pest control, and horticulture.

“For the Sunday night-only counts, we were at 106 mosquitos per trap. Our average historically, if you want to put that into perspective, is approximately 70.”

https://globalnews.ca/news/5473321/regina-mosquito-population-spike/

So back to your opening comment, too much of warmth is sometimes not so good.
« Last Edit: July 15, 2019, 12:54:28 am by LesPalenik »
Logged

Rob C

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 24074
Re: Extreme weather
« Reply #96 on: July 15, 2019, 04:33:41 am »

There  was a documentary recently on tv about the Tundra in  Russia. Apparently, vast craters are opening up as the deep permafrost melts and the suface collapses downwards.

As Russ suggests, nice to be old enough not to see the worst of it when it cometh. But the kids, the kids...

;-)

Bart_van_der_Wolf

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 8847
Re: Extreme weather
« Reply #97 on: July 15, 2019, 06:13:16 am »

Right now, we are having another hot summer here. The air and water temperatures in southern Ontario are now pretty much the same as in southern Florida. For this coming week, the Toronto forecast calls for up to 32C (90F) temperatures, with Humidex reaching 43C (109F). Too hot for me and all dogs in our neighbourhood.

  • Average global temperatures increases are just that, Average. The extremes will become more extreme, and it will heat-up faster on the Northern hemisphere with more landmass.
  • Statistics from the USA indicate that at the current rate of warming, 1% more deaths are expected/reported due to heat-stress in the USA .
  • More Cities in several regions, like in India, are becoming too hot for human life.
  • More regions are falling victim to flooding due to the expanding watervolumes and heavier local downpours.
  • More periods of extreme drought will cause failed harvests.
  • In my country we are suffering from exotic insect infestations (and we're situated at a latitude similar to The Canada/USA border), there are not enough natural enemies for those insects. Currently, we have a tripling of the number of Oak Procession-Caterpillars (Thaumethopea processionea) in 1 year, and there are not enough resources to clean the environment with mechanical means. They cause extreme irritation that can result in anaphylactic shock. Another version that lives on pine trees is approaching fast.
  • Mosquitoes have 'hatched' 1 month earlier than usual, and we are at the verge of losing the battle with the Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus) which carries the West Nile virus and Dengue fever, which is likely to permanently settle in my country (without natural enemies it will cause explosive growth of those mosquitoes). Malaria mosquitoes are inbound as well.

Quote
So back to your opening comment, too much of warmth is sometimes not so good.

And it's not just that on average it's getting warmer, it's the relatively extreme rate of increase that's unprecedented. Nature cannot adapt fast enough, so ecosystems will suffer casualties. Human behavior is one of the main reasons that ecosystems are spiraling out of control.

Cheers,
Bart
Logged
== If you do what you did, you'll get what you got. ==

Rob C

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 24074
Re: Extreme weather
« Reply #98 on: July 15, 2019, 06:47:21 am »

And irony of ironies, they look to space travel as a holy grail. The lemmings are not all in the British Isles.

Rob

Alan Goldhammer

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 4319
    • A Goldhammer Photography
Re: Extreme weather
« Reply #99 on: July 15, 2019, 07:47:40 am »

    • More Cities in several regions, like in India, are becoming too hot for human life.

    Cheers,
    Bart
    We take heat for granted in the US because of the massive amount of air conditioning in homes and offices that keep things tolerable.  The vast number of people in the world do not have such a 'luxury' including much of Western Europe.  The last bad heat wave in Europe (ten years ago???) saw over 100 deaths in Paris IIRC.
    Logged
    Pages: 1 ... 3 4 [5] 6 7 ... 113   Go Up