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Author Topic: Warm spot and cold beer  (Read 602 times)

Ivo_B

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Re: Warm spot and cold beer
« Reply #20 on: May 17, 2019, 12:56:28 pm »

Well, within the context of LuLa I can immediately identify even this image as a real Ivo_B, if that helps any...  =:-/

Are you a woman? In that case: I love you. 💕

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Ivo_B

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Re: Warm spot and cold beer
« Reply #21 on: May 17, 2019, 12:58:52 pm »

Doesn't look like it. I often touch my nose in the similar fashion when I am contemplating something.

I know a guy who pulls his nostril hair during contemplation.
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Slobodan Blagojevic

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Re: Warm spot and cold beer
« Reply #22 on: May 17, 2019, 01:14:35 pm »

I know a guy who pulls his nostril hair during contemplation.

Now, this is an example of freedom of speech going to far ;D

RSL

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Re: Warm spot and cold beer
« Reply #23 on: May 17, 2019, 01:47:53 pm »

Well, within the context of LuLa I can immediately identify even this image as a real Ivo_B, if that helps any...  =:-/

I can do the same thing, Oscar, but I doubt I mean the same thing you mean by that.

Rob C

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Re: Warm spot and cold beer
« Reply #24 on: May 17, 2019, 02:32:53 pm »

It is true, this post is more a little but not evil provocation. I think the discussions (not the rant) under such a provocation are more interesting than the +1's, 'As Usual' and 'Good Grab' comments.

All tough, it's not a provocation for the provocation, I do believe in photography as pure registration with no attempt to conceal a boisterous or disturbing environment. I strongly believe in William Eggleston's statements:
 
“You can take a good picture of anything. A bad one, too.” –
“It quickly came to be that I grew interested in photographing whatever was there wherever I happened to be. For any reason.” – William Eggelston


I like to search the boundaries of my work, stretching my photographic comfort zone.
Alas, I can only dream of a consistent body of work, it's not me, I'm not enough concentrated on one thing, when I understand one thing, I move to the next.


But I have no time for Eggleston, not finding him interesting at all, despite watching documentaries in an efffort to discover what I may have been missing, that clouds my perception of his greatness. One thing that pisses me off, of course, is the commonly applied comment that he was the founder of colour photography within the vernacular canon. What utter rubbish! When those who promote someone can't get their facts right, it makes for a lousy start for the belief system to latch onto any positive vibe.

Now, if you want a consistent body of work, then it's not hard to do: you decide what interests you most and go with that, if only not to bore yourself with diversionary excursions down blind alleys.

Maybe you just don't feel any overriding interest in any particular area of visual expression or subject, in which case I offer my sympathies, because I know that without having such a desire I would not have become a photographer if just to be a GP. I, for one, require an obsession to become motivated enough to do the work, or I'd be better off spending my time, at this stage of life, sitting in cafés drinking coffee all day long. Faced with that lack of obsession in my youth, I'd probably have remained an unhapppy engineer all my life, or eventually said the hell with it, and gone to work in my brother-in-law's chain of estate agencies and own my Mercedes today. But I did have the obsession, and it gave me the life I wanted if not much wealth at the end of it all, but that was my fault, not that of the obsession.

Frankly, I find the idea of being lukewarm about one's photography unbelievable; why would anyone bother and spend so much time and money over very little?
« Last Edit: May 17, 2019, 02:36:28 pm by Rob C »
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Ivo_B

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Re: Warm spot and cold beer
« Reply #25 on: May 17, 2019, 02:33:10 pm »

I can do the same thing, Oscar, but I doubt I mean the same thing you mean by that.

I love you too, Russ.
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Rob C

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Re: Warm spot and cold beer
« Reply #26 on: May 17, 2019, 02:39:46 pm »

Guys, let's stick with a topic that has, unusually for here, a potential to become really interesting and not blow it with silly little swipes at each other.

:-)

Ivo_B

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Re: Warm spot and cold beer
« Reply #27 on: May 17, 2019, 02:54:16 pm »


But I have no time for Eggleston, not finding him interesting at all, despite watching documentaries in an efffort to discover what I may have been missing, that clouds my perception of his greatness. One thing that pisses me off, of course, is the commonly applied comment that he was the founder of colour photography within the vernacular canon. What utter rubbish! When those who promote someone can't get their facts right, it makes for a lousy start for the belief system to latch onto any positive vibe.

Now, if you want a consistent body of work, then it's not hard to do: you decide what interests you most and go with that, if only not to bore yourself with diversionary excursions down blind alleys.

Maybe you just don't feel any overriding interest in any particular area of visual expression or subject, in which case I offer my sympathies, because I know that without having such a desire I would not have become a photographer if just to be a GP. I, for one, require an obsession to become motivated enough to do the work, or I'd be better off spending my time, at this stage of life, sitting in cafés drinking coffee all day long. Faced with that lack of obsession in my youth, I'd probably have remained an unhapppy engineer all my life, or eventually said the hell with it, and gone to work in my brother-in-law's chain of estate agencies and own my Mercedes today. But I did have the obsession, and it gave me the life I wanted if not much wealth at the end of it all, but that was my fault, not that of the obsession.

I'm with you in the last paragraph, Rob. Tell me something about obsessions.

About Eggleston, we don't need to agree.
Some years ago, when I was shooting the here so often applauded street style, I didn't take the effort to look at the work of Eggleston, Gruyaerts, etc. And when I was confronted with that style of photography, only a strong contempt crossed my mind, I'm glad my opinions on that subject disappeared with the downfall of that particular Dutch Website. They reflect a shortsighted photographic mind.
At a certain point I realized that the shift in my photographic style was getting (modest) common ground with Eggleston and because I knew why I was shifting to another style, I started to understand the work of Eggleston and alike.

It is said before. Something happened after 1960 in Photoland and it is good, interesting and a pleasure to discover.
To celebrate this, I will link to a piece of art. (Russ, Rob, Slobodan, ... hold your breath)


D. Lachapelle
« Last Edit: May 17, 2019, 03:23:58 pm by Ivo_B »
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Slobodan Blagojevic

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Re: Warm spot and cold beer
« Reply #28 on: May 17, 2019, 03:22:10 pm »

Is that masterpiece yours, Ivo?

Ivo_B

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Re: Warm spot and cold beer
« Reply #29 on: May 17, 2019, 03:24:46 pm »

Is that masterpiece yours, Ivo?

No, I forgot to add the credits
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Rob C

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Re: Warm spot and cold beer
« Reply #30 on: May 17, 2019, 04:25:22 pm »

No, I forgot to add the credits


Almost the moment I joined LuLa I remember receiving quite a lot of flack for daring to voice my acute dislike for our David. I hated the forced colours, the hype-over-substance of the work that used to be published everywhere; it wasn't even orignal: there was a German guy doing Hasselblad, Ektachrome, pola filters and hard flash to get the contrast and unreality before him - did fashion, too. Then there was the other guy who did the same with cars - I think he was French or Dutch? Dingo? I didn't think David was a good fashion photographer, either. I'm sure it broke his heart. Just as for Eggleston. Right. He, David, became an art photographer in the end, didn't he? Those guys were all over French PHOTO every issue! Great magazine during the 80s... I had a stack about a yard high of them and still have a stack 113mm thick - just checked for the sake of truth - of my pick of the lot of those I bought. Like Playboy, but in the opposite direction, they morphed from pretty rough to cool. Kept me up to speed with my French; I should never have stopped buying them just for that! But I think I just got bored with them all.

:-)
« Last Edit: May 17, 2019, 04:37:27 pm by Rob C »
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