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Author Topic: Canon, film slrs are they all full frame?  (Read 3152 times)

Eric Myrvaagnes

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Re: Canon, film slrs are they all full frame?
« Reply #20 on: January 28, 2019, 08:41:09 pm »

I remember some consumer-grade cameras which used half a 35mm frame per shot, so you got 72 slides from a 36 roll.
Long ago I had a Zeiss Baby Ikonta that did exactly that.
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Slobodan Blagojevic

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Re: Canon, film slrs are they all full frame?
« Reply #21 on: January 29, 2019, 01:15:09 am »

Not correct. The Olympus Pen series of SLRs were 35mm half frame. If we want to be particularly pedantic there was also a 126 SLR made by Rollei and there were plenty of medium format SLRs too.

The OP asked specifically about Canon SLRs, so my response was within that context.

Dan Wells

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Re: Canon, film slrs are they all full frame?
« Reply #22 on: January 29, 2019, 10:46:49 am »

Of purely historical interest (24x36mm was standard by WW II at the latest) some early 35mm cameras (I believe, including certain very early Leicas) used slightly different frame sizes like 24x32 and 24x36mm. These existed in addition to what were later called half-frame cameras, which used variants on the original 35mm movie film size (they were around 16x24 or 18x24mm, and the exposures ran the other way on the film - the camera took a vertical picture when the film ran horizontally. Half-frame cameras have never been common, but a few have been made at most times in the history of 35mm film.

There have also been a variety of panorama formats on 35mm film. The Hasselblad XPan got some modest traction in the 1990s, and was something like 24x65mm. Some odd cameras that swing the lens (or the entire camera) during the exposure managed to go wider still - I think there have been 180 and 360 degree pano cameras that were 24x100mm, or even longer than that.

Unless there were a few half-frame SLRs during the 1960s and 1970s (were some or all of the Olympus PEN line SLRs?), I can't think of any of these that used SLR viewing - they were all variants on viewfinder and rangefinder cameras, I think there were also one or two electronic-era SLRs in the 1980s or 1990s that had a half-frame mode?
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kers

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Re: Canon, film slrs are they all full frame?
« Reply #23 on: January 29, 2019, 02:41:40 pm »

Answer to the original question;   Yes !  :)
 
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Slobodan Blagojevic

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Re: Canon, film slrs are they all full frame?
« Reply #24 on: January 29, 2019, 03:35:36 pm »

Answer to the original question;   Yes !  :)

Sorry, no. There was Canon EOS IX that was APS-C, as I posted on page 1.

Dan Wells

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Re: Canon, film slrs are they all full frame?
« Reply #25 on: January 29, 2019, 09:18:06 pm »

And the EOS IX (and IX lite) used standard EF lenses... They did not, however, use standard 35mm film. There has never been a Canon 35mm film SLR that used a format other than 24x36mm.
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kevs

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Re: Canon, film slrs are they all full frame?
« Reply #26 on: February 01, 2019, 11:49:52 pm »

BTW, I shot for years on a Nikon 8008, it was not pro, but very close, great camera. Was there a Canon version of that? Not pro like the 1 or 1N, or 3, but very close in quality?
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Martin Kristiansen

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Re: Canon, film slrs are they all full frame?
« Reply #27 on: February 02, 2019, 01:21:14 am »

BTW, I shot for years on a Nikon 8008, it was not pro, but very close, great camera. Was there a Canon version of that? Not pro like the 1 or 1N, or 3, but very close in quality?

Canon A1 perhaps. I used a pair of those for about a decade.
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kevs

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Re: Canon, film slrs are they all full frame?
« Reply #28 on: February 02, 2019, 01:22:40 am »

Sorry forgot to add, has to take EOS lenses..
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Dan Wells

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Re: Canon, film slrs are they all full frame?
« Reply #29 on: February 05, 2019, 12:35:02 am »

The EOS A2 and A2E, EOS-3 and EOS-1V were all very nice late film-era EOS bodies. Really any EOS will do if you're shooting print film and not shooting sports (if you're using slide film, the better meters of the higher-end bodies are an advantage, and if you're doing sports or wildlife, anything but a 3 or a 1V will be frustrating if you're used to good DSLR AF). A good condition 1V may still be pricey, but what's amazing about film body pricing is that once you get below the final top pro models (EOS 1V, Nikon F5 or F6) and ignoring Leicas, it almost doesn't matter what it once sold for - it's a few hundred or less used.
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kevs

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Re: Canon, film slrs are they all full frame?
« Reply #30 on: February 05, 2019, 12:50:38 am »

Thanks Dan, no sports, wildlife, and not even using the meter. Just people fine art. So.. you think even low end ones are cool? Elan.. only thing is I'd love to find a mint condition of something, and that seems hard to find?  KEH, the lower end ones, they just have as is...
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Dan Wells

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Re: Canon, film slrs are they all full frame?
« Reply #31 on: February 06, 2019, 05:56:51 pm »

I suspect KEH is taking all those "as is" cameras in among collections of digital equipment and lenses they buy from retiring photographers and from estates, then not bothering to test them because they aren't worth much even if mint. Many of them may be in great shape, but no way to tell...

Green Mountain Camera in Vermont has a nice EOS 5 (overseas version of an A2E) - they claim cosmetically 9, tested and fully functional, for $40. I have no connection to them, other than that I've bought a lot of gear from them over the years (I lived in Burlington, VT for 15 years). It may also be worth calling Hunt Photo in Melrose, MA or B&H - neither bothers posting film cameras other than weird high-end stuff online, but either might very well have something. Any store that buys big lots of gear probably ends up with film bodies.

I'm not sure about the rules about posting commercial links, but googling Green Mountain Camera will turn them up, and the EOS-5 is in the used gear listing on the main site (it may also be on their eBay shop)

One thing to watch out for with many Canon film bodies including that EOS-5 is that they use an infrared LED in the frame counter. Works just fine on most film, and more precise than counting sprockets - but it fogs infrared film...

Dan.
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kevs

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Re: Canon, film slrs are they all full frame?
« Reply #32 on: February 06, 2019, 10:32:07 pm »

As is I always interpret as broken.. no guarantee..

Thanks Dan, I'll try out the 5 on Green Mountain. I was hoping to land a mint condition 1N or 1  for..  $150 to $200, but this will be fine..not as cool as the Pro 1N, but it's just to shoot a tad of film using my current EOS lenses. Most of this project will be digital, but it's nice to go back in time and shoot film.

For the really cool looking film camers, I just picked up on Ebay a Nikon F1 and a Pentax Spotmatic ($200, $85)... look are gorgeous to look at. both came with a 50mm.

I liked the fact the 5 has all the manuals, cool.

Funny, when I searched for a Canon 5 on Ebay, you could not find it because they have name so many digiitals now with 5 this or that..  I heard of Hunt, and I did notice that BH only post more expensive used stuff, you email them for little things? So Hunt and Green Mountain, and I heard..Roberts, Goja... are like the Samys of the east coast (I'm' in LA), ie reputable good stores....
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kers

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Re: Canon, film slrs are they all full frame?
« Reply #33 on: February 07, 2019, 05:34:59 am »

...
For the really cool looking film camers, I just picked up on Ebay a Nikon F1 and a Pentax Spotmatic ($200, $85)... look are gorgeous to look at. both came with a 50mm.
...

I would like to buy a Nikon F3 HP- i hear it has the most gorgeous viewfinder.
Always shot Nikon and the 8008 was a camera that never failed. ( had the FE, 8008, F100, d2x, d3, d3x, d800e, d810 and now the d850... most of them had never a problem)
Talking about optical viewfinders; It is a pity all recent DSLRs have half translucent mirrors; a good mirror would bring the quality back to the old days.
« Last Edit: February 07, 2019, 05:38:08 am by kers »
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Pieter Kers
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Dave Rosser

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Re: Canon, film slrs are they all full frame?
« Reply #34 on: February 07, 2019, 09:20:00 am »

As is I always interpret as broken.. no guarantee..



For the really cool looking film camers, I just picked up on Ebay a Nikon F1 and a Pentax Spotmatic ($200, $85)... look are gorgeous to look at. both came with a 50mm.

Being pedantic there is no such thing as a Nikon F1. the camera was the Nikon F and was followed by the F2.  Canon had nicked the F1 name for the Canon F1 before the Nikon F2 was introduced.

Dave
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Dan Wells

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Re: Canon, film slrs are they all full frame?
« Reply #35 on: February 07, 2019, 11:38:44 am »

I've never lived in New York, so I'm not sure what B&H does with the stuff they don't post on the web - they almost certainly get a ton of it when they buy whole systems. It would be hard to run on their scale without getting hundreds of film bodies every month - and not all of them are going to be recent pro stuff, Leicas, Hasselblads and 4x5" (which seems to be about all they post).

Hunt has a couple of big display cases full of used gear (and I'm quite sure it's not all on the web - I haven't been in there in a couple of months, but I'm sure I recall multiple film bodies). I wasn't looking for one, so I don't recall Canon vs. Nikon vs. others (I'm pretty sure I would have mentally filed Leicas in a different category), nor whether they were tested.

Green Mountain seems to post most things somewhere - some on the web, some on their eBay site.

KEH seems to dump a huge fraction of stuff as "AS-IS" - they either got a jumbo load of broken film cameras or simply aren't bothering to test them. It seems far more likely that they don't bother to test them. I  wonder what would happen if you called them asking for something in a general category (e.g. takes EOS lenses, reasonable to use) and offered them $25 extra to pick one that looks like it's in decent shape and has no obvious operational flaws? They wouldn't offer their usual guarantee, but could you get them to say "it's not broken leaving here"?
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kevs

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Re: Canon, film slrs are they all full frame?
« Reply #36 on: February 07, 2019, 01:28:06 pm »

thanks Dan what does this mean, "and offered them $25 extra to pick one that looks like it's in decent shape and has no obvious operational flaws? They wouldn't offer their usual guarantee, but could you get them to say "it's not broken leaving here"?"

That was hard to follow, but I want to know.. maybe I'll use that one day!
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kevs

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Re: Canon, film slrs are they all full frame?
« Reply #37 on: February 07, 2019, 01:29:07 pm »

Thanks Dave, good point.. did Canon basically just copy Nikon's nomenclature back then?
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Dan Wells

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Re: Canon, film slrs are they all full frame?
« Reply #38 on: February 07, 2019, 09:09:09 pm »

If (as seems likely) KEH's huge pile of AS-IS gear is actually merely untested, instead of known broken, they might take a reasonable offer to test a few cameras and sell one that works . They must have some that are cosmetically decent, and that they have no reason to think are broken. Would they pick out a working one if someone paid them to do it?

This assumes that the pile of AS-IS gear was acquired as part of larger deals when they bought volumes of gear they actually wanted, and they simply didn't bother to test it. The other possibility is that they bought a bunch of broken cameras (maybe from a repair shop going out of business) to sell for parts. If that's the case, few or none of them work and my idea of asking them to test stuff for a fee has no value.
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Dave Rosser

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Re: Canon, film slrs are they all full frame?
« Reply #39 on: February 11, 2019, 09:44:40 am »

Thanks Dave, good point.. did Canon basically just copy Nikon's nomenclature back then?
Back in the 1960s there were really only 2 Professional 35mm film cameras the Leica M series and the Nikon F.  By professional I don't just mean those intrepid war photographers with a Nikon and Long lens over one shoulder and a Leica M with wide angle over the other but the scientific and engineering community.  The Nikon F was highly modular, it had interchangeable backs (250 exposure anyone?), interchangeable viewfinders, a multiplicity of focusing screens, motor drives and a host of technical attachments.  At the time Canon was not a player in this scientific/engineering field in particular and the Canon F1 was its attempt to enter.  I guess the thought that by using F in the name they might give the impression that theirs was an alternative to the Nikon F in the specialist fields.  In practice in the engineering field one had to jump through hoops to justify purchase of such a system and Nikon had such a track record that spending company money on a new supplier would be very hard to sell to the money men. :-[

Dave

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