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Author Topic: The Relentless Jessica Eaton  (Read 5673 times)

OmerV

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Re: The Relentless Jessica Eaton
« Reply #40 on: January 21, 2019, 10:21:02 am »

You can appreciate white, and you can appreciate black, but that doesn’t mean there isn’t a hard distinction.

Even in my relatively short time(2016) with LuLa there have been distinct front page showcase articles. But, it seems now attention to those differences has been heightened solely by the change in management.

It has yet to be month since the change. I would think it is a little early to declare the end of everything.  ::)

elliot_n

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Re: The Relentless Jessica Eaton
« Reply #41 on: January 21, 2019, 10:31:19 am »

One ought to be a little careful with words like "nonrepresentational" which tends to get used as a synonym for "abstract", but it's not.

Koons animals are abstract, but representational, like Cubist paintings and so on.

They don't look at all abstract to me. They're very accurate representations of ballon-dogs (albeit somewhat larger) — a representation of a representation.

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amolitor

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Re: The Relentless Jessica Eaton
« Reply #42 on: January 21, 2019, 10:44:46 am »

Koons is PLAYING WITH A DIALECTIC between DOGS and BALLOON DOGS. He places his works IN CONVERSATION WITH actual dogs.

Actually that would be kind of cool to photograph actual dogs interacting with Koons dogs. Hmm.
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Slobodan Blagojevic

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Re: The Relentless Jessica Eaton
« Reply #43 on: January 21, 2019, 11:07:47 am »

... I would think it is a little early to declare the end of everything.  ::)

Nobody declares anything. However...

... If this is a harbinger of the future direction of LuLa...

Rob C

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Re: The Relentless Jessica Eaton
« Reply #44 on: January 21, 2019, 11:38:09 am »

Someone for whom money is important is probably not going to become an artist.


Interesting; so you may as well rule out all the old masters, the later ones and every pro photographer.

Unless a dilettante born to riches, where the artist who doesn't have to hustle to earn his keep and, to do that, money is of huge concern.

It's just one of those annoying, silly bits of folklore best ignored. I worked my ass off to make enough to feed self and family; do you think that now, retired, were I simply a mercenary I'd spend the time I do on this website, that any other professional image maker here would do so too?

Rob

jeremyrh

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Re: The Relentless Jessica Eaton
« Reply #45 on: January 21, 2019, 11:47:16 am »


Interesting; so you may as well rule out all the old masters, the later ones and every pro photographer.

Unless a dilettante born to riches, where the artist who doesn't have to hustle to earn his keep and, to do that, money is of huge concern.

It's just one of those annoying, silly bits of folklore best ignored. I worked my ass off to make enough to feed self and family; do you think that now, retired, were I simply a mercenary I'd spend the time I do on this website, that any other professional image maker here would do so too?

Rob

Rob - I think you've misunderstood. I don't doubt that you worked hard to feed your family. My point was that if money had been a big motivator you'd have made more of it and worked a lot less doing something else.
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OmerV

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Re: The Relentless Jessica Eaton
« Reply #46 on: January 21, 2019, 11:59:17 am »

Nobody declares anything. However...

Yeah, if. And barley a month isn't a harbinger, just a bit of spice. Like the Cuban culture in Florida.   ;D

petermfiore

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Re: The Relentless Jessica Eaton
« Reply #47 on: January 21, 2019, 12:32:23 pm »

I read the article but now in viewing the images again, I'm trying to get past the technical aspect. It would be unfortunate if the meaningfulness of the pictures is dependent on knowing the degree of difficulty in the making of them.

Hi OmerV
I have come to the point that if I really like or love someone's work, I do not read about the making. For me the images are what I need to consider for my world. Reading too much about process often will destroy it's mystery. Like a magic trick. Once the secret is revealed the childlike wonderment is gone forever.

Peter

Martin Kristiansen

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Re: The Relentless Jessica Eaton
« Reply #48 on: January 21, 2019, 12:43:46 pm »

Hi OmerV
I have come to the point that if I really like or love someone's work, I do not read about the making. For me the images are what I need to consider for my world. Reading too much about process often will destroy it's mystery. Like a magic trick. Once the secret is revealed the childlike wonderment is gone forever.

Peter

I tend to agree. As little no as you talking about the technical stuff. I don’t care what camera, lens, film, whatever.

I do like to hear what motivated the photographer though. What they choose to shoot what they shoot. That interests me.
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Slobodan Blagojevic

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Re: The Relentless Jessica Eaton
« Reply #49 on: January 21, 2019, 12:49:13 pm »

... I have come to the point that if I really like or love someone's work, I do not read about the making. For me the images are what I need to consider for my world. Reading too much about process often will destroy it's mystery. Like a magic trick. Once the secret is revealed the childlike wonderment is gone forever.

There is something to it.

I had a high-school friend who didn't speak English but nevertheless loved many pop and rock songs. Later in life he learned English and then told me how disappointed he is now, listening to his favorite songs from his youth. The words now sound banal, nothing compared to the lyrics' meaning he imagined it had.

petermfiore

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Re: The Relentless Jessica Eaton
« Reply #50 on: January 21, 2019, 01:13:30 pm »


I do like to hear what motivated the photographer though. What they choose to shoot what they shoot. That interests me.

For me it has to be the WHY things are made, not how. When you read about an artist explain their work, It's a delicious air of enlightenment that is brought to the table. No it's not a code breaking, just the clarity of a unique vision.

Peter

OmerV

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Re: The Relentless Jessica Eaton
« Reply #51 on: January 21, 2019, 01:28:11 pm »

Hi OmerV
I have come to the point that if I really like or love someone's work, I do not read about the making. For me the images are what I need to consider for my world. Reading too much about process often will destroy it's mystery. Like a magic trick. Once the secret is revealed the childlike wonderment is gone forever.

Peter

Well, I’d not known of Ms. Eaton before the article so without some notion of her ideas, everything then was her daunting process.

I think most people would find the initial construction of the Satute of Liberty interesting, but the meaning of the statue is undoubtedly the salient point.

Rand47

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Re: The Relentless Jessica Eaton
« Reply #52 on: January 21, 2019, 02:29:40 pm »

I find the work very pretty.  And, with the peek behind the curtain I find it very clever, if too amazingly complicated for the net result.

Rand
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elliot_n

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Re: The Relentless Jessica Eaton
« Reply #53 on: January 22, 2019, 05:33:21 am »

Eaton's move towards abstraction, and her use of analog techniques to mimic digital effects, can be seen as part of a broader movement in contemporary photographic art practice. See Charlotte Cotton's 'Photography is Magic', Aperture, 2015 (which features Eaton amongst many other artists):

https://www.amazon.com/Photography-Magic-Charlotte-Cotton/dp/159711331X

For a more historical view of abstraction in photography, see the catalogue of Tate Modern's recent exhibition 'Shape of Light':

https://www.amazon.com/Shape-Light-Years-Photography-Abstract/dp/1942884311

Lyle Rexer's book on abstract photography is also worth a look:

https://www.amazon.com/Lyle-Rexer-Vision-Abstraction-Photography/dp/1597112429
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Jeremy Roussak

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Re: The Relentless Jessica Eaton
« Reply #54 on: January 22, 2019, 08:02:08 am »

I had a high-school friend who didn't speak English but nevertheless loved many pop and rock songs. Later in life he learned English and then told me how disappointed he is now, listening to his favorite songs from his youth. The words now sound banal, nothing compared to the lyrics' meaning he imagined it had.

Of course, it might be that now he had grown up, songs about teenage angst no longer held meaning for him.

Jeremy
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Rob C

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Re: The Relentless Jessica Eaton
« Reply #55 on: January 23, 2019, 03:47:06 am »

Of course, it might be that now he had grown up, songs about teenage angst no longer held meaning for him.

Jeremy

Not only that, when you are young, music is about rhythm and dance, and how it might facilitate your sex life. Apart from the hook, it really doesn't matter what the words are, as a quick look at any top forty list will show you. The advent of the music video concept made that abundantly obvious, where words ceased to mean anything at all.

There were some great videos.

;-)

KLaban

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Re: The Relentless Jessica Eaton
« Reply #56 on: January 23, 2019, 05:25:44 am »

When I sing - and I sing very badly - my wife tells me I always get the words wrong. Perhaps it's just her way of saying darling, give it a  rest. 
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Rob C

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Re: The Relentless Jessica Eaton
« Reply #57 on: January 23, 2019, 06:31:12 am »

When I sing - and I sing very badly - my wife tells me I always get the words wrong. Perhaps it's just her way of saying darling, give it a  rest.

Mine simply did the same as she did when I had my swamp pop rock on in the office: she quietly closed the door, with me on the other side. For some unknown reason, I hardly ever used the earphones back then.

Today, I have them on a lot, which is nice: I fail to hear the 'phone ring - whan  it does - and whenever I check out the lost call it invariably ends up in my long unwanted calls list. Bluetooth is a handy invention. It allows the dishes to be done in no time at all, which is a remarkable feature that I should perhaps have pointed out in the other thread, the one about time shrinking as one ages.

D Fuller

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Re: The Relentless Jessica Eaton
« Reply #58 on: January 24, 2019, 06:40:25 am »

I find the work very pretty.  And, with the peek behind the curtain I find it very clever, if too amazingly complicated for the net result.

Rand

This work only seems amazingly complicated compared to processes you are familiar with. To many, this idea of stitching a panorama seems over-complicated. It’s really all context. I used to do quite a lot of stop-action animation (on film). The glimpses of Eaton’s process in the video remind me a lot of that process—meticulous, but not really that complicated, once you’ve figured out the “language.”

Process aside, I find her work quite beautiful. I love the abstract painters of the post WW II era, and this work seems to have a very honest connection with some of those artists. Not just a passing nod, but a much deeper connection with the color theories that were being explored.
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Rob C

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Re: The Relentless Jessica Eaton
« Reply #59 on: January 24, 2019, 02:21:05 pm »

This work only seems amazingly complicated compared to processes you are familiar with. To many, this idea of stitching a panorama seems over-complicated. It’s really all context. I used to do quite a lot of stop-action animation (on film). The glimpses of Eaton’s process in the video remind me a lot of that process—meticulous, but not really that complicated, once you’ve figured out the “language.”

Process aside, I find her work quite beautiful. I love the abstract painters of the post WW II era, and this work seems to have a very honest connection with some of those artists. Not just a passing nod, but a much deeper connection with the color theories that were being explored.

I wonder how you arrive at making a comparison between a mechanically derived process, more mechanical even than straight photography is held to be in some quarters, and work that's purely the product of mind (imagination) and hand as is abstract painting?

Yes, I realise this can be seen as dangerously close to the original objections posed by painters and their promoters when photography began to gain some artistic traction in the world, but this present stuff is happening in a different era when those original objections have largely been overcome; frankly, it strikes me as a wilfully painful path without any special artistic merit at the end of it; that it can be sold, of course, is another matter altogether.
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