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Author Topic: A New Year's Andromeda  (Read 580 times)

Colorado_CJ

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A New Year's Andromeda
« on: January 04, 2019, 09:41:22 AM »

Hello everyone.  This might fit here, it IS nature after all and a kinda landscape, from a LONG way away  ;)

I took this on New Year's Day at 3 degrees, kinda cold and hazy, but it turned out well. This is my first Andromeda using my new guide setup. Quite a bit better than my last attempt.

This is 38 images at 300 seconds each and 400 ISO for a total of 3.2 hours.

Shot using:

Stellarvue SV80 Access
EQ6-R Pro Mount
Nikon D600 (unmodified)
ZWO ASI120MC-S Guide Camera
Astromania 60mm Guide Scope


Andromeda Galaxy - New Years Day by Andrew Marjama, on Flickr
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32BT

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Re: A New Year's Andromeda
« Reply #1 on: January 04, 2019, 10:23:39 AM »

Absolutely and utterly perfect.
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Regards,
~ O ~
If you can stomach it: pictures

Peter McLennan

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Re: A New Year's Andromeda
« Reply #2 on: January 04, 2019, 10:25:08 AM »

Fantastic.  Hard to believe this image isnít the product of some zillion-dollar telescope on a mountain in Chile.    Could you explain a little more about how it was shot? Maybe a shot of the camera setup?
Congratulations and thanks for posting.
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Telecaster

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Re: A New Year's Andromeda
« Reply #3 on: January 04, 2019, 05:00:51 PM »

Excellent! A great example of what you can do with modest spec'd but high quality equipment. Not to mention experience and developed technique.

-Dave-
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Eric Myrvaagnes

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Re: A New Year's Andromeda
« Reply #4 on: January 04, 2019, 08:16:50 PM »

Absolutely and utterly perfect.
+1.
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-Eric Myrvaagnes (visit my website: http://myrvaagnes.com)

Leszek Piotrowski

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Re: A New Year's Andromeda
« Reply #5 on: January 04, 2019, 10:32:20 PM »

Great, wonderful,... If I saw more of these images (like yours) ,... I don't really need to leave the earth's surface! Thanks for posting.
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Leszek, G

Colorado_CJ

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Re: A New Year's Andromeda
« Reply #6 on: January 07, 2019, 09:02:52 PM »

Thanks everyone.

I am pretty new to astrophotography, I've only been in it a couple months, so I have a lot to learn still.

Here's is a shot of my setup.  It is all run from my laptop and once set up, is automatic. 

Astrophotography Setup by Andrew Marjama, on Flickr

That little red circular thing is a guide camera.  That camera, along with a program called PHD2, guides the mount, correcting it every second so that the mount tracks with sub-pixel accuracy. Meaning I can image for as long as I want and a pinpoint star will not move more than .5 pixels or so during a whole 4 hour imaging session.  It is hard to believe the amount of precision available today for very little money.

Once I find an object I'd like to shoot for the night, I use a program called Astro Photography Tool and Selarium (a free planetarium program), to point the telescope and to control the camera. 

After a session, I have around 3-4 hours of separate images, usually of around 5 minute exposures.  These separate exposures I have to "Stack" in a stacking program.  There is a free stacking program called "Deep Sky Stacker, but I use a program called "Astro Pixel Processor".  This stacking program first analyses each image and maps out the stars, it then registers each image and finally stacks each image, aligning each star and adjusting each image for rotation.

Stacking builds detail while taking away noise.  The more images you stack, the deeper, clearer and more detailed a deep sky image gets.

For example, this is a single 300 second frame from the Andromeda image above.  As you can see, there isn't a whole lot there.  BUT, take 30-40 of these images, run them through the stacking program, and like magic, you get a very usable image.

Andromeda single 300 sec frame by Andrew Marjama, on Flickr

And here is the image you get after stacking.  This is before post processing the image in Photoshop

Andromeda_1-1-19_190_min stacked by Andrew Marjama, on Flickr


So far this astrophotography has really been addicting!  Seeing these images start to pop up on the screen, running them through the stacking program and processing them is a huge amount of fun.  I am blown away that I am able to capture what I am capturing.  I really didn't think it would be as easy as it is, and as fun.

Cloudy nights are now my nemesis  ;D
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Peter McLennan

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Re: A New Year's Andromeda
« Reply #7 on: January 07, 2019, 11:18:14 PM »

Astonishing.  Computational Photography, servomechanisms, dedication and lots of hard work.  Absolutely beautiful results. 
Congratulations. And thanks for the detailed "behind the scenes" info and pix. I'm sure we all look forward to more from you.
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Eric Myrvaagnes

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Re: A New Year's Andromeda
« Reply #8 on: January 08, 2019, 12:16:24 AM »

Thanks for the descriptions. The result is stunning, and I look forward to many more images from this setup.
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-Eric Myrvaagnes (visit my website: http://myrvaagnes.com)

Kevin Gallagher

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Re: A New Year's Andromeda
« Reply #9 on: January 08, 2019, 07:26:24 AM »

 Wow!! Stunning is indeed the word! Great writeup on the gear and your technique as well!!
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Kevin In CT
All Animals Are Equal But Some Are More Equal
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BradSmith

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Re: A New Year's Andromeda
« Reply #10 on: January 09, 2019, 03:26:37 PM »

I'm amazed that this image could be produced with equipment that costs this little.  I would have thought that it might take 10's of thousands of dollars to get this quality.  Really impressive.
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dehnhaide

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Re: A New Year's Andromeda
« Reply #11 on: January 11, 2019, 04:58:01 PM »

Blown away it would be an understatement. And the details you're providing with such generosity make my hands itchy... :)
Congratulations!!!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
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John Hollenberg

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Re: A New Year's Andromeda
« Reply #12 on: January 15, 2019, 01:35:53 PM »

Very interesting and informative post.  It stirred up my interest in deep sky astrophotography, but more likely of the armchair kind.  It is possible to do remote astrophotography with excellent sky conditions (little light pollution) using an expensive telescope and not having to stay up at night or face cold temperatures.  Just my kind of astrophotography.  There are several sites that allow you to rent time on a telescope, reserve time, submit a plan of what you want to photograph, have the plan executed automatically and then download the data and process it yourself.  For example:

https://www.itelescope.net/

Has anyone ever used one of these remote astrophotography services?  I am thinking about trying it myself for fun.
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