Pages: 1 2 3 [4] 5   Go Down

Author Topic: Best 44" printer for fine art  (Read 3685 times)

Remko

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 71
Re: Best 44" printer for fine art
« Reply #60 on: September 29, 2018, 03:11:59 PM »

Glad to hear this, Remko. I'm curious if better scuff resistance was a part of their in booth sales pitch, and if so, were you able to make any direct observations about it?

Did you witness any media loading to be able to compare it to previous models?

The fact that you mention beautiful tonality without mentioning the ink changes directly is, I suppose, a good sign that no visible artifacts from giving up the light inks jumped out at you. If it is a non-issue to the naked eye, it means HP succeeded in their objective.

It was not a sales pitch, it was me asking questions 😉. And the friendly people of HP very willing to answer them. And if they were not sure about an answer they asked one of their colleagues or the EMEA Designjet Product Manager. I did not ask about the scuff resistance and they did not mention it.

The printer was loaded with a roll and was printing more or less continuously. As I myself have no experience with the previous model, I would not have been able to compare anyhow.

Yes, you are right. I indeed did not see any artifacts although I was looking for them.

As some here on LL mentioned that taking out the light cyan and light magenta, as is the case in the new Z-Series, might make it challenging to have nice transitions in the highlights, I asked about that specifically. Acc to HP the transitions in the highlights are great and they are proud (in a positive way, I mean) on what they have achieved with this printer and especially the new inks and printhead.
When I later revisited their booth I saw one print with true highlights in the sky and was really impressed with what I saw.

cheers,
Remko

N.B. Edited some typos.
Logged

shadowblade

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2515
Re: Best 44" printer for fine art
« Reply #61 on: September 29, 2018, 08:39:27 PM »

It was not a sales pitch, it was me asking questions 😉. And the friendly people of HP very willing to answer them. And if they were not sure about an answer they asked one of their colleagues or the EMEA Designjet Product Manager. I did not ask about the scuff resistance and they did not mention it.

The printer was loaded with a roll and was printing more or less continuously. As I myself have no experience with the previous model, I would not have been able to compare anyhow.

Yes, you are right. I indeed did not see any artifacts although I was looking for them.

As some here on LL mentioned that taking out the light cyan and light magenta, as is the case in the new Z-Series, might make it challenging to have nice transitions in the highlights, I asked about that specifically. Acc to HP the transitions in the highlights are great and they are proud (in a positive way, I mean) on what they have achieved with this printer and especially the new inks and printhead.
When I later revisited their booth I saw one print with true highlights in the sky and was really impressed with what I saw.

cheers,
Remko

N.B. Edited some typos.

Sounds like good news re: colour tonality.

Did you see the black-and-white output? If they can match or exceed the output of the Z3200 using multiple inks, it sounds promising.

Piezography uses six or seven different concentrations of ink to achieve its black-and-white tonality, but its main problem is that it relies on clog-prone Epson printers that need to be run constantly. It would be great if the HP could achieve the same tonality using fewer inks but variable drop size.

Of course, the elephant in the room is print longevity. No matter what HP and other manufacturers claim, I won't believe them until there are hard figures out there.
Logged

enduser

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 522
Re: Best 44" printer for fine art
« Reply #62 on: September 29, 2018, 09:07:23 PM »

I have been wondering for a while about the light cyan and light magenta not featuring in the new "Z" printers from HP.  For many years we have been using Canon 12 color iPF 24" printers. We have an HP T120 which only has cyan, magenta and yellow.(and a pigment black).  We print a lot of flowers and I have a 24 x 36 " from the Canon and the same image at the same size from the HP bth on the same paper. (Yes, I know one is pigment and the other is dye)

No one can pick which  is which by eye. On the HP you have to make sure you dial in the "best" print routine. I immediately thought that the T120 which is a relatively new design has a much improved ink placement system to be able to achieve such an outcome.  Now I see that the "Zs" do away with the same colors I'm pretty sure there's been a development at HP in ink dot layout.
Logged

Ernst Dinkla

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 3730
Re: Best 44" printer for fine art
« Reply #63 on: September 30, 2018, 05:52:29 AM »

It was not a sales pitch, it was me asking questions 😉. And the friendly people of HP very willing to answer them. And if they were not sure about an answer they asked one of their colleagues or the EMEA Designjet Product Manager. I did not ask about the scuff resistance and they did not mention it.

The printer was loaded with a roll and was printing more or less continuously. As I myself have no experience with the previous model, I would not have been able to compare anyhow.

Yes, you are right. I indeed did not see any artifacts although I was looking for them.

As some here on LL mentioned that taking out the light cyan and light magenta, as is the case in the new Z-Series, might make it challenging to have nice transitions in the highlights, I asked about that specifically. Acc to HP the transitions in the highlights are great and they are proud (in a positive way, I mean) on what they have achieved with this printer and especially the new inks and printhead.
When I later revisited their booth I saw one print with true highlights in the sky and was really impressed with what I saw.

cheers,
Remko

N.B. Edited some typos.

Remko, thank you for the information.  Confirms my experience with HP people when I met them, developers often at the booth too, not just the sales department.
Do you get an impression about the profiling targets, bigger ones with more patches possible?

Met vriendelijke groet, Ernst

http://www.pigment-print.com/spectralplots/spectrumviz_1.htm
March 2017 update, 750+ inkjet media white spectral plots
Logged

Mark Lindquist

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1370
  • itís not about the photos we take - itís the ones we leave
    • LINDQUIST STUDIOS
Re: Best 44" printer for fine art
« Reply #64 on: September 30, 2018, 08:18:15 AM »

I was at the Photokina yesterday and spoke with the people from HP about their new Z-Series. They had both the 24 and the 36 inch of the Z9 on the booth, with the 24 being used for making A2 sized prints.

A couple of things I learnt.

I asked if they were aware that some people in the US had received bad sample prints that were printed on the new Z9 Series. They were and learnt about it via LL. They were surprised as HP was not involved in this and started an investigation to learn what images had been printed and by whom. They found out that a distributor in the US has sent those sample prints. But unfortunately used images that were edited and optimised for brochures. And these edited images were printed on a beta version of the Z9 Series.

Both the 24 and the 36 inch Z9 will have the option of the GLoss Enhancer. They themselves only have the Gloss Enhancer on there machines in their demo center in Barcelona since a couple of weeks. I was shown the difference the gloss made as the friendly lady pointed out the slight bronzing that was apparent on the print without the Gloss Enhancer. Honestly, I found it difficult to see the bronzing. But on another B&W print I did see it. The same image printed with the Gloss Enhancer eliminated the bronzing.
The Gloss Enhancer btw can be printed on the whole image.

According to HP the longevity is at least as good as with the Z-Series. The color gamut is more or less the same.

I find it difficult to judge a print when it is not one of my own images. But from what I have seen, I am very impressed! Beautiful tonality and very sharp prints!

cheers,
Remko

Greetings Remko,
Thanks very much for your report.  Several of us have been waiting for additional details on the new HP printers so your information is very welcome.  Thanks for clearing up the ďbad samples issueĒ.
Do you know if the 24Ē model has the embedded spectrophotometer? The spec sheet does say the 44Ē has it. But itís important to know if the 24Ē does as well. I canít imagine that it doesnít, but confirmation wsould be great.

There seems to be some connfusion regarding the GE slot - that it is an upgrade, according to the sales brochures.  By any chance were you able to get any more information about that?  There has been some speculation that the cartridge slot could take a UV coating among other options as well in the future.  Just wondering if there was any discussion along those lines?

Also, the achilles heel of the Z3200 printer series has always been the printer carriage belt which begins to disintegrate after 3-5 years (longer in some cases) that starts by dropping small black blotches on the print, then gradually declines until it literally shreds itself.  Replacement has been an involved process and many who have replaced belts have used a special kevlar belt that LPS sells that lasts much longer. Is there any new information about internal components of the new Zís compared to the old?

Would you be able to shed any light regarding the rollout of this new product - why HP has been so quiet about it, and there has been no third party testing regarding ink longevity and results of ink/media comparisons?  When Carles Magrinya, Head of Worldwide Strategic Sales for HP WF from Barcelona visited my studio a few years ago, he did say the Vivid inks tested better than Vivera.  I asume itís because of the new dual drop delivery system?

It would be good to have independent testing from Aardenburg Imaging, as many photographers rely on his testing, which has become the benchmark for Ink/media fade results.

Finally, although I have many additional questions, were you able to see the vertical trimmer in action?  Do you know how the interface or GUI for that works?  Does it trim just the margins, or can it trim the print in the center, or wherever it is specified?

Itís great that you are able to tell us your findings as we are basicly in the dark with no real reviews yet.

Thanks much,

Mark
Logged

Remko

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 71
Re: Best 44" printer for fine art
« Reply #65 on: September 30, 2018, 10:57:54 AM »

Sounds like good news re: colour tonality.

Did you see the black-and-white output? If they can match or exceed the output of the Z3200 using multiple inks, it sounds promising.

Piezography uses six or seven different concentrations of ink to achieve its black-and-white tonality, but its main problem is that it relies on clog-prone Epson printers that need to be run constantly. It would be great if the HP could achieve the same tonality using fewer inks but variable drop size.

Of course, the elephant in the room is print longevity. No matter what HP and other manufacturers claim, I won't believe them until there are hard figures out there.

Yes, I was shown black-and-white output. The prints were very small and used to show the effect of the Gloss Enhancer to counter bronzing. As I hardly print B&W myself and have never seen B&W output from the Z3200, I cannot say much about any difference with the new Z9.

cheers,
Remko
Logged

Remko

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 71
Re: Best 44" printer for fine art
« Reply #66 on: September 30, 2018, 10:59:23 AM »

Remko, thank you for the information.  Confirms my experience with HP people when I met them, developers often at the booth too, not just the sales department.
Do you get an impression about the profiling targets, bigger ones with more patches possible?

Met vriendelijke groet, Ernst

http://www.pigment-print.com/spectralplots/spectrumviz_1.htm
March 2017 update, 750+ inkjet media white spectral plots

Thank you, Ernst.

I did not ask about the profiling targets, so unfortunately cannot answer your question.

cheers,
Remko
Logged

Remko

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 71
Re: Best 44" printer for fine art
« Reply #67 on: September 30, 2018, 11:20:03 AM »

Greetings Remko,
Thanks very much for your report.  Several of us have been waiting for additional details on the new HP printers so your information is very welcome.  Thanks for clearing up the ďbad samples issueĒ.
Do you know if the 24Ē model has the embedded spectrophotometer? The spec sheet does say the 44Ē has it. But itís important to know if the 24Ē does as well. I canít imagine that it doesnít, but confirmation wsould be great.

There seems to be some connfusion regarding the GE slot - that it is an upgrade, according to the sales brochures.  By any chance were you able to get any more information about that?  There has been some speculation that the cartridge slot could take a UV coating among other options as well in the future.  Just wondering if there was any discussion along those lines?

Also, the achilles heel of the Z3200 printer series has always been the printer carriage belt which begins to disintegrate after 3-5 years (longer in some cases) that starts by dropping small black blotches on the print, then gradually declines until it literally shreds itself.  Replacement has been an involved process and many who have replaced belts have used a special kevlar belt that LPS sells that lasts much longer. Is there any new information about internal components of the new Zís compared to the old?

Would you be able to shed any light regarding the rollout of this new product - why HP has been so quiet about it, and there has been no third party testing regarding ink longevity and results of ink/media comparisons?  When Carles Magrinya, Head of Worldwide Strategic Sales for HP WF from Barcelona visited my studio a few years ago, he did say the Vivid inks tested better than Vivera.  I asume itís because of the new dual drop delivery system?

It would be good to have independent testing from Aardenburg Imaging, as many photographers rely on his testing, which has become the benchmark for Ink/media fade results.

Finally, although I have many additional questions, were you able to see the vertical trimmer in action?  Do you know how the interface or GUI for that works?  Does it trim just the margins, or can it trim the print in the center, or wherever it is specified?

Itís great that you are able to tell us your findings as we are basicly in the dark with no real reviews yet.

Thanks much,

Mark

My pleasure, Mark.

Yes, I asked about whether the spectrophotometer was also included with the 24"model as, like you, I could not imagine it was not the case. And the spectrophotometer is indeed included. I asked if the functionality was the same as with the Z3200, and that was confirmed. So good news!

I did not ask about new components ref the carriage belt.

I asked them about the silence around the Z9 after these printers were shown some months ago at the Drupa. They are aware of that. To me it seems they were not ready yet to market the new printers, but I can be wrong of course. They said that from now on they will start marketing the new Z6 and Z9.

Yes, more than one from HP said that is the combination of the new inks with the new heads and the new dual drop delivery system that make the improvements possible.

Ref Aardenburg Imaging, I addressed that when talking with the EMEA Product Manager. A great guy. Also told him that Mark is investing his own money when buying a printer for testing, as Mark has told us here on LL. So that it would be wonderful if it was possible for Mark to have HP provide him a Z9 for some period of time. The PM was certainly interested and I gave him Mark's e-mail address after asking Mark whether that would be okay. So they will get in touch with each other.

The vertical trimmer is only available on the 44" and that one was not switched on. So I cannot tell you anything about it. What I do like is the tiltable touch screen. When I saw them operating the 24" printer, the touch screen and scrolling worked remarkably smooth.

cheers,
Remko
« Last Edit: September 30, 2018, 11:30:31 AM by Remko »
Logged

Mark Lindquist

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1370
  • itís not about the photos we take - itís the ones we leave
    • LINDQUIST STUDIOS
Re: Best 44" printer for fine art
« Reply #68 on: September 30, 2018, 12:05:42 PM »

Again, thanks for the information Remko, much appreciated. When Magrinya was here from Barcelona, I suggested a touch screen that could be adjusted to be used from behind the printer. Do you know if the screen on the new zís function that way?
Thanks-
Mark
Logged

Remko

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 71
Re: Best 44" printer for fine art
« Reply #69 on: September 30, 2018, 12:59:36 PM »

Again, thanks for the information Remko, much appreciated. When Magrinya was here from Barcelona, I suggested a touch screen that could be adjusted to be used from behind the printer. Do you know if the screen on the new zís function that way?
Thanks-
Mark

😀

Well, if you do not tilt the screen - so it lays flat with the top of the printer - and you have no issues reading the symbols upside down, than, yes, I could see that work.
That was a great suggestion you made to Magrinya, Mark.

Edited:
just to add: you are talking of a screen that could be adjusted for being used behind the printer. If that is implemented I do not know.

cheers,
Remko
« Last Edit: September 30, 2018, 01:03:55 PM by Remko »
Logged

Mark Lindquist

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1370
  • itís not about the photos we take - itís the ones we leave
    • LINDQUIST STUDIOS
Re: Best 44" printer for fine art
« Reply #70 on: September 30, 2018, 01:43:10 PM »

😀

Well, if you do not tilt the screen - so it lays flat with the top of the printer - and you have no issues reading the symbols upside down, than, yes, I could see that work.
That was a great suggestion you made to Magrinya, Mark.

Edited:
just to add: you are talking of a screen that could be adjusted for being used behind the printer. If that is implemented I do not know.

cheers,
Remko

What I suggested was a touch screen that could be adjusted to tilt backwards so that it would be facing the user standing behind the printer while loading paper sheets or rolls.  Additionally, I suggested that when the screen was adjusted to be read from the back, the text would ďflip overĒ to be read properly (not upside down) the way text and images automatically correct when turning a smart phone in whatever direction.
But most importantly, I advocated for touch screen controls. That would have changed the user interface dramatically.  Our cameras work with touch screens (phase 1, Hasselblads, Nikon D850, etc.) so itís a known current technology - should be easy to implement.

I also suggested that the loading of sheets could be done from the front, particularly since via the controls we have already with the Z3200ís, ďmove paper forwardĒ and ďmove paper backĒ it should be a relatively simple process to make that jump with the new Zís.  I read somewhere that thin sheets with size limitations can now be front loaded?

Additionaly (among other suggestions) I also advocated for a cassette tray for sheet sizes up to 17x22 be added from behind for auto feeding of up to 50 sheets for multiple runs of prints or for portfolio making.  I even sent a rudimentary concept drawing package which I was requested to do.  Actually, he asked for a simple sketch but I sent a 6 page pdf sketchup presentation.  Guess that didnít make it either.

Still in all, I take it you were definitely impressed with the printer?

Best,

Mark
Logged

Remko

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 71
Re: Best 44" printer for fine art
« Reply #71 on: October 01, 2018, 03:31:33 PM »

Additionaly (among other suggestions) I also advocated for a cassette tray for sheet sizes up to 17x22 be added from behind for auto feeding of up to 50 sheets for multiple runs of prints or for portfolio making.  I even sent a rudimentary concept drawing package which I was requested to do.  Actually, he asked for a simple sketch but I sent a 6 page pdf sketchup presentation.  Guess that didnít make it either.

Still in all, I take it you were definitely impressed with the printer?

Best,

Mark

Hi Mark,

I did not notice a cassette tray. IT for sure is not there when viewing the printer at the front. But I did not see anything sprecial when looking at the back of the printer. So I guess a cassette tray is not implemented unfortunately. I have one with my Epson Pro 4000 and it is really handy. So I love the idea of a cassette tray.

Yes, I was - and still am - very impressed with this printer!

All the best to you,
Remko
Logged

Panagiotis

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 216
Re: Best 44" printer for fine art
« Reply #72 on: October 01, 2018, 04:06:49 PM »

I checked the HP support page for the Z9+ and the are already two firmware updates on the initial firmware with what it seems important fixes like "IQ and color improvements" etc. Maybe the printers were not ready when they introduced back in June. Also I found some interesting pictures in the following site (bottom of the page):

http://www.hackworth.co/hp-designjet-z9/

showing among other details the LCD and that the roll 1 is loaded from the front (I thought someone said that the printer is only back loaded?)
Also I found the following picture showing the back of the printer (hope these will add some information on the mysterious new HP printers :) ).

Logged

deanwork

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1555
Re: Best 44" printer for fine art
« Reply #73 on: October 02, 2018, 04:11:43 PM »

Bright, saturated, speedy posters with vertical trims are the new fine art. With resin coated posters from Kinkos and Office Depot who needs galleries and museums, or even art collectors, and who needs subtle monochrome? Thatís all so 20th century.




quote author=Panagiotis link=topic=126853.msg1070857#msg1070857 date=1538424409]
I checked the HP support page for the Z9+ and the are already two firmware updates on the initial firmware with what it seems important fixes like "IQ and color improvements" etc. Maybe the printers were not ready when they introduced back in June. Also I found some interesting pictures in the following site (bottom of the page):

http://www.hackworth.co/hp-designjet-z9/

showing among other details the LCD and that the roll 1 is loaded from the front (I thought someone said that the printer is only back loaded?)
Also I found the following picture showing the back of the printer (hope these will add some information on the mysterious new HP printers :) ).


[/quote]
Logged

shaun

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 140
Re: Best 44" printer for fine art
« Reply #74 on: October 02, 2018, 05:48:39 PM »

I use 24 hp z3100. Started giving problems with red and MBlack print head a couple of years ago. Been around in circles with this and it just isn't with it to get a repair man in. Hp stopped supporting this printer so I have to run a very old version of Mac OS or else whole image isn't printed. The fact that HP just stopped supporting this printer several years ago now would be enough for me. If I were to get a z3200 no doubt that would stop being supported too. I would go epson or canon.
Logged

Christopher

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1341
    • http://www.hauser-photoart.com
Re: Best 44" printer for fine art
« Reply #75 on: October 02, 2018, 05:53:04 PM »

The z3100 had many problems, but Iím not surprised there wasnít any support a few years ago. Itís quite old already.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Logged
Christopher Hauser
[[email protected]

Mark Lindquist

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1370
  • itís not about the photos we take - itís the ones we leave
    • LINDQUIST STUDIOS
Re: Best 44" printer for fine art
« Reply #76 on: October 03, 2018, 10:54:40 AM »

I checked the HP support page for the Z9+ and the are already two firmware updates on the initial firmware with what it seems important fixes like "IQ and color improvements" etc. Maybe the printers were not ready when they introduced back in June. Also I found some interesting pictures in the following site (bottom of the page):

http://www.hackworth.co/hp-designjet-z9/

showing among other details the LCD and that the roll 1 is loaded from the front (I thought someone said that the printer is only back loaded?)
Also I found the following picture showing the back of the printer (hope these will add some information on the mysterious new HP printers :) ).



Thanks for that link Pangiotis - it helps to have some more puzzle pieces.  Sure, one can load the top roll from the front, but after leaning over with some really heavy rolls in the worst ergonomic position, I imagine that that would be only occasionally.  Depends of course on where and how the leading edge of the paper goes in.



Most of the discussion around loading from the front and back centers around loading sheets, which is and has been the problem.  We've been using Ernst Dinkla's solution from long ago - a work-around, loading the sheets in through the roll slot, however bypassing the so called tray, and loading straight through on top of the roll, directly in. The photos don't show any front loading, only bent over top loading and loading from the back as before.  Also no sheet loading.
We can only hope the loading issues have improved.

 

The one good thing is that they have included cowls (covers) over each roll, which will be a great help for keeping dust off the rolls.

Thankfully, it also looks like they've kept the printhead cartridge system where each printhead cartridge has 2 colors. This means no changing an entire print head costing thousands when one clog sends the printer down.  Now, as before, if one printhead has problems it can be pulled and replaced easily and cheaply like it has been ever since the HPZ3100 through the current HP Z3200ps machines.



As far as understanding what and how the vertical trimming works, the following photo shows two blue tabs that apparently are positioned manually to set the vertical trimmer settings?  Not sure, but this is the first clue that we've seen:



This photo below, verifies that the screen is a touch screen, and it looks like a USB3 port has been included, which is another mystery, but an interesting one.



Judging from the photos on that page: More HP Designjet Z9+ Photos

It now seems that the new Z printers are an upgrade of what we now have in the Z3200ps printers.  An important and well thought out upgrade, given that inks, dual roll loading, tilt touch screen, controls, and the vertical trimmer are newly re-designed.

I would love to put one of these through its paces - it looks promising. But first and foremost, Aardenburg needs to do testing.  Without comprehensive testing by a credible, ethical 3rd party well established source, using I* technology, there is no way to accurately compare Vivid with Vivera other than HP's claims that "Vivid tests better."

All in all, ink issues aside, the new Z6 and Z9+ printers are looking pretty interesting.

Best -

Mark

* All images are used under "fair use" for educational purposes.
Logged

Roscolo

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 690
Re: Best 44" printer for fine art
« Reply #77 on: December 09, 2018, 06:17:03 PM »

r claims regarding the Z3200ps (which now we see are being somewhat slightly tempered) are so outrageous that from my perspective there is no point in discussing it with you or with Chris any further.

What this does do for me, or rather what good I find in the few recent posts from the I.T Guys, is a warning to steer widely clear from using I.T. Supplies as a source for purchasing printers, inks and papers, and particularly seeking any kind of support.



Man, that is the gospel truth.

Logged

kers

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1896
    • Pieter Kers
Re: Best 44" printer for fine art
« Reply #78 on: December 10, 2018, 06:35:19 AM »

I use 24 hp z3100. Started giving problems with red and MBlack print head a couple of years ago. Been around in circles with this and it just isn't with it to get a repair man in. Hp stopped supporting this printer so I have to run a very old version of Mac OS or else whole image isn't printed. The fact that HP just stopped supporting this printer several years ago now would be enough for me. If I were to get a z3200 no doubt that would stop being supported too. I would go epson or canon.

I have a 12 year old HPz3100
I am printing on 10.13.6  no problem encountered (yet)
everything seems to work fine.
About reds on matte-  that is a basic weakness of the z3100 and is solved in the z3200 with the other red ink...
12 years usages - about 6 print heads - one belt replacement- two ventilators- new guiding rods... ( replaced by HP) that is it...
prints are the same as 12 years ago. ( so also hold up)
Logged

BernardLanguillier

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Online Online
  • Posts: 11873
    • http://www.flickr.com/photos/bernardlanguillier/sets/
Re: Best 44" printer for fine art
« Reply #79 on: December 10, 2018, 08:26:28 AM »

Just read through this thread and loved the heated debate! ;)

If I wrote half of that about my beloved Nikons I'd be called a fanboy!  ;D

As far as I am concerned, the fact that ImagePrint doesn't support the HP would be a serious downer, but I guess I would look at things differently if I had the skills and patience to fine tune my own profiles.

Cheers,
Bernard
Pages: 1 2 3 [4] 5   Go Up