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Author Topic: Coating an inkjet print for a glossy or "wet" look...  (Read 1986 times)

nirpat89

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Re: Coating an inkjet print for a glossy or "wet" look...
« Reply #20 on: June 21, 2018, 07:08:58 AM »

Good to know, thanks.  Price-wise Liquitex seems a little cheaper but then Hahne has the UV protection. 

If you don't mind, please keep us updated on your progress....


:Niranjan.
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jimcamel

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Re: Coating an inkjet print for a glossy or "wet" look...
« Reply #21 on: June 21, 2018, 02:04:45 PM »

I know the kind of look you're going for and I did a number of 24x30" prints a couple of years ago on Epson Cold Press Natural and coated them with Premier Eco Print Shield and then Satin.  It had the more saturated look I was looking for and toughened up the surface, too.  I liked the look.

In Canada we could only get the roll-on products - however, even if you can get the easier-to-apply spray your problem is how to mask the white border.  With spray you could lay down some foam core scraps.  With roll-on it will be tougher to get a sharp line.

http://www.ecoprintshield.com/
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Ernst Dinkla

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Re: Coating an inkjet print for a glossy or "wet" look...
« Reply #22 on: June 23, 2018, 08:33:26 AM »

Liquitex will have a UV blocking version too. Like Lascaux has. I doubt very much the UV blocking character if the varnish layer thickness is minimal like normally created with the spray cans. However the layer will reduce degradation of inks and OBAs but gases like oxygen and ozone. UV blocking agents in thicker varnish layers will  be effective. Like done on matte canvasses and to create gloss on matte papers like discussed in this thread.

Never done it but my approach would be to use magnetic vinyl strips for the masking, steel plate underneath. Tape the joints between the magnetic strips. Spray a solvent version type varnish first lightly to close the surface and the gap between mask and paper. Either roll or pour a glossy varnish emulsion on top of that. Let it dry long. A UV curing or two component version could speed up the last step. Remove the masking. All over liquid laminations like that exist already. Longevity has never been tested properly.

Met vriendelijke groet, Ernst

http://www.pigment-print.com/spectralplots/spectrumviz_1.htm
March 2017 update, 750+ inkjet media white spectral plots

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DavidPalermo

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Re: Coating an inkjet print for a glossy or "wet" look...
« Reply #23 on: June 23, 2018, 05:53:16 PM »

I tried Frog Tape but it stuck to the paper so I will return it.  My next task will be to buy a few 8x10, 11x14 and 16x20in picture mats and use them as a masking template.   I will place the mat over the print and line up the edges and paint inside the 8x10 cut-out area.  Should work.  I don't quite get the steel and vinyl solution you mentioned.  I think even a metal ruler would work though I'd have to move it to each edge as I paint which doesn't sound good.
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nirpat89

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Re: Coating an inkjet print for a glossy or "wet" look...
« Reply #24 on: June 24, 2018, 07:05:28 PM »

I tried Frog Tape but it stuck to the paper so I will return it.  My next task will be to buy a few 8x10, 11x14 and 16x20in picture mats and use them as a masking template.   I will place the mat over the print and line up the edges and paint inside the 8x10 cut-out area.  Should work.  I don't quite get the steel and vinyl solution you mentioned.  I think even a metal ruler would work though I'd have to move it to each edge as I paint which doesn't sound good.

Try using Post-it Notes.  They are most likely to not to leave adhesive behind or rip the surface.  You can get it in the tape form as well.
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MHMG

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Re: Coating an inkjet print for a glossy or "wet" look...
« Reply #25 on: June 24, 2018, 11:50:12 PM »

Try using Post-it Notes.  They are most likely to not to leave adhesive behind or rip the surface.  You can get it in the tape form as well.

On microporous inkjet paper coatings, even the lowest tack adhesives like those used in Post-it notes are indeed likely to leave some residue. Does it matter? I have no clue. It will be an acrylic adhesive polymer not likely to yellow any time soon, so in that sense the residue may well remain colorless for as long as the image colorants resist fading and the paper resists yellowing, but again, the adhesive residue is still there, and longevity of the entire processing methodology becomes an unknown factor.
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shadowblade

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Re: Coating an inkjet print for a glossy or "wet" look...
« Reply #26 on: June 25, 2018, 01:18:13 AM »

Breathing Color Timeless Gloss, diluted 4 parts Timeless to 1 part de-ionised water. You can add a drop of Photo-Flo if you wish, for improved wetting.

Spray it onto printed matte paper with a HVLP sprayer. 5-6 coatings for high gloss, allowing each one to sink in, but not dry, before applying the next.

For extra-smooth results, after applying the final coating (which you may want to make slightly thicker than the others), sandwich it face-down against a sheet of teflon-coated glass. It will take on the ultra-smooth surface of the glass, and, due to the teflon coating, won't stick to it and will peel right off.

Works better for some papers than for others.
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stockjock

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Re: Coating an inkjet print for a glossy or "wet" look...
« Reply #27 on: June 25, 2018, 02:57:09 PM »


For extra-smooth results, after applying the final coating (which you may want to make slightly thicker than the others), sandwich it face-down against a sheet of teflon-coated glass. It will take on the ultra-smooth surface of the glass, and, due to the teflon coating, won't stick to it and will peel right off.
That idea of using teflon coated glass is really interesting.  Is that something you purchase or is there a spray or liquid that you can use to make your own?  I see different Dupont products on Amazon but it is unclear if they are appropriate for this application.
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shadowblade

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Re: Coating an inkjet print for a glossy or "wet" look...
« Reply #28 on: June 26, 2018, 08:06:02 AM »

That idea of using teflon coated glass is really interesting.  Is that something you purchase or is there a spray or liquid that you can use to make your own?  I see different Dupont products on Amazon but it is unclear if they are appropriate for this application.

The spray-on dry lubricants containing Teflon work fine.

If you're doing a lot of it, you can also spray on a more permanent Teflon coating, but this needs to be baked on at 400 degrees Celcius, so isn't practical to do on large sheets of glass at home.
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stockjock

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Re: Coating an inkjet print for a glossy or "wet" look...
« Reply #29 on: June 27, 2018, 01:42:24 PM »

Spray it onto printed matte paper with a HVLP sprayer. 5-6 coatings for high gloss, allowing each one to sink in, but not dry, before applying the next.
One last question.  Is there a reason why you are using matte paper?  I would have thought starting with a glossy paper would have given you the glossiest surface with the best dmax and most depth but I've never tried spraying photos so I have no idea.
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shadowblade

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Re: Coating an inkjet print for a glossy or "wet" look...
« Reply #30 on: June 28, 2018, 04:35:47 AM »

One last question.  Is there a reason why you are using matte paper?  I would have thought starting with a glossy paper would have given you the glossiest surface with the best dmax and most depth but I've never tried spraying photos so I have no idea.

The only thing that really matters in terms of glossiness is the smoothness and reflectiveness of the topmost layer, not what the underlying paper is like. Timeless won't sink into a glossy paper, so you need to use matte.

The other thing is, with some matte papers, you can get Timeless to sink so deep into the paper that it can't possibly delaminate - even if you try to peel it off, the entire image layer (and some of the paper) comes with it, fully intact.
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