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Author Topic: Street Art  (Read 8848 times)

GreggP

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Re: Street Art
« Reply #40 on: May 25, 2018, 12:18:34 pm »

And in your own comments, Rob and Russ, for every treatise on "Street Photography," there are six more that don't just contradict a long held study of what constitutes Street, but indeed completely reinvent the wheel. I spent the better part of this week looking at the all time greats starting with HCB and while I think I understand the mindset into what they shot and why, I then go to some of the more modern streeters and they don't seem to see the HCB style an d have developed a "new" street style.

It seems to me there is more a direction toward trending the human condition rather than observing the same. There seems to be a need to exploit the poor, homeless, addicted, etc instead of recording the interaction of humans to one another or humans toward the environment. I don't know but the more I read, the more I become confused.

I'm a member of several Facebook groups dedicated to street photography. One of the groups defines the genre as-

"Street photography deals with representing the human life in its many nuances and the context in which it consumes its drama, the city with its innumerable roads. The subjects are men, women, children and elderly people interacting with the environment, or frozen in significant moments and situations that express happiness, humor, discomfort, social drama. The image with its emotional content becomes the witness of a fragment of reality that took place in an area of the world and allows everyone to learn about them. The street photographers have this ability to observe everyday life in unusual situations and to capture the decisive moment when he/she is unaware of being the protagonist in sometimes dramatic events." Street photography could be summarized: "photos taken in the street, in an urban context. Trying to steal moments of life. Not staged..."

This is one of the definitions I am trying to follow. The operative word being "trying." It's a lot harder than I thought.

My attempt at "impressionism" isn't acceptable by one of these groups because their rules state: "Image manipulation is not acceptable. Creating mirror images in post processing to imply reflections and multiple exposures are not allowed."

Another definition I like is:

"Street photography captures a fleeting moment of comedy, drama, light, geometry, shades, and textures making an everlasting record of our world. It's a bit like photojournalism, but there really doesn't have to be anything newsworthy. It can be more about ordinary life. The images might include interesting architecture, automobile design, and/or clothing styles, but these details aren't as important as the overall artistic elements. There are many ways to express your artistic vision. Images can be literal representations of a time and place or more impressionistic using combinations of shading, colors, lighting or by blurring an otherwise sharp scene or photographing during a rainstorm or foggy evening."

Ivophoto

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Re: Street Art
« Reply #41 on: May 25, 2018, 12:23:51 pm »

And in your own comments, Rob and Russ, for every treatise on "Street Photography," there are six more that don't just contradict a long held study of what constitutes Street, but indeed completely reinvent the wheel. I spent the better part of this week looking at the all time greats starting with HCB and while I think I understand the mindset into what they shot and why, I then go to some of the more modern streeters and they don't seem to see the HCB style an d have developed a "new" street style.

It seems to me there is more a direction toward trending the human condition rather than observing the same. There seems to be a need to exploit the poor, homeless, addicted, etc instead of recording the interaction of humans to one another or humans toward the environment. I don't know but the more I read, the more I become confused.

It’s not strange to see a big shift in subjects shot in the street.

It’s linked with the social and economic reality.

It is not wandering everywhere, it’s walking hand in hand with time.
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Rob C

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Re: Street Art
« Reply #42 on: May 25, 2018, 02:04:26 pm »

A few more. All taken before we moved out of the city to a small rural town.


For me, the entire series you posted fits the street art concept very well.

Rob

Rob C

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Re: Street Art
« Reply #43 on: May 25, 2018, 02:23:19 pm »

I'm a member of several Facebook groups dedicated to street photography. One of the groups defines the genre as-

"Street photography deals with representing the human life in its many nuances and the context in which it consumes its drama, the city with its innumerable roads. The subjects are men, women, children and elderly people interacting with the environment, or frozen in significant moments and situations that express happiness, humor, discomfort, social drama. The image with its emotional content becomes the witness of a fragment of reality that took place in an area of the world and allows everyone to learn about them. The street photographers have this ability to observe everyday life in unusual situations and to capture the decisive moment when he/she is unaware of being the protagonist in sometimes dramatic events." Street photography could be summarized: "photos taken in the street, in an urban context. Trying to steal moments of life. Not staged..."

This is one of the definitions I am trying to follow. The operative word being "trying." It's a lot harder than I thought.

My attempt at "impressionism" isn't acceptable by one of these groups because their rules state: "Image manipulation is not acceptable. Creating mirror images in post processing to imply reflections and multiple exposures are not allowed."

Another definition I like is:

"Street photography captures a fleeting moment of comedy, drama, light, geometry, shades, and textures making an everlasting record of our world. It's a bit like photojournalism, but there really doesn't have to be anything newsworthy. It can be more about ordinary life. The images might include interesting architecture, automobile design, and/or clothing styles, but these details aren't as important as the overall artistic elements. There are many ways to express your artistic vision. Images can be literal representations of a time and place or more impressionistic using combinations of shading, colors, lighting or by blurring an otherwise sharp scene or photographing during a rainstorm or foggy evening."


Well there you go: those sites you quoted print "rules" or let"s call 'em expectations, that seem to hang well with much of what's been written about the genre by one or two of us here.

Now, as this specific thread is supposed to be about street "art" which, almost by definition, is not simply a form of reporting of the human condition as in flesh and blood, but more of the nature of the impact that man has had in his city environment by virtue of the shapes, colours and graphic design he creates, knowingly or otherwise, I find myself in disagreement with - well, no, not disagreement - but more a sense of impatience with the discouraging of manipulation.

Of the many different things that digital has given us, perhaps the most promising comes exactly with the facility for manipulation.

Personally speaking, I have lost interest in the idea of straight "street art", and have concluded that it offers something else that makes photography for me, more interesting: it allows one to make what seems a promising image and then take it elsewhere, into the realm of personal expression and beyond the obvious one that was the initial draw to the camera.

It's akin, I suppose, to buying sheet music and then playing it your way, if you know how.

GreggP

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Re: Street Art
« Reply #44 on: May 25, 2018, 03:39:38 pm »

I like to think in terms of musical genres. To me, street is kind of like jazz and landscape is classical orchestrations. Jazz has lots of sub-genres, as does street. What you describe as "street art" is one of these very interesting sub-genres. Using my music comparison, it's maybe a little like improvisational, avant-garde jazz?

Rob C

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Re: Street Art
« Reply #45 on: May 25, 2018, 06:07:39 pm »

Yes, I suppose that it is; there seems to be a frequent link between photography and music, my regret being that insofar as music goes, I can only be a fan!

It's interesting you cite avant-guard jazz along with improvisation: wasn't that what New Orleans was all about before the modern variants sprang up?

;-)

Slobodan Blagojevic

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Re: Street Art
« Reply #46 on: May 25, 2018, 07:28:36 pm »

If the essence of street photography is making pictures of interesting ephemera in public spaces, then I'd say this image—which is both clever and rather striking—qualifies.  I might also describe it as a cityscape.

Not that it matters all that much which bucket it fits into as long as it's an interesting photograph.

Thanks, Chris.

In case it is not obvious, only the lower half is a mural, i.e., someone else’s art. The top half, a cloudy sky is my attempt to elevate it above a simple replica of someone else’s art into something more, a methaphorocal interpretation of the “head in the clouds” saying. I moved left and right, up and down, until I got that one cloud in the perfect position, like the head’s extension. Apparently, my intention fell flat for many.

OmerV

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Re: Street Art
« Reply #47 on: May 25, 2018, 08:54:14 pm »

Thanks, Chris.

In case it is not obvious, only the lower half is a mural, i.e., someone else’s art. The top half, a cloudy sky is my attempt to elevate it above a simple replica of someone else’s art into something more, a methaphorocal interpretation of the “head in the clouds” saying. I moved left and right, up and down, until I got that one cloud in the perfect position, like the head’s extension. Apparently, my intention fell flat for many.

Yes, a nice picture. What makes it for me is the handicap parking sign. Gives it both gravitas and goofiness, like our current political atmosphere. :)

Ivophoto

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Re: Street Art
« Reply #48 on: May 26, 2018, 01:27:31 am »

Thanks, Chris.

In case it is not obvious, only the lower half is a mural, i.e., someone else’s art. The top half, a cloudy sky is my attempt to elevate it above a simple replica of someone else’s art into something more, a methaphorocal interpretation of the “head in the clouds” saying. I moved left and right, up and down, until I got that one cloud in the perfect position, like the head’s extension. Apparently, my intention fell flat for many.

Not at all, Slobodan, I like you’re picture.
Here, the mural is serving your picture and you message, totally not a blunt replica of someone else’s art.
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Ivophoto

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Re: Street Art
« Reply #49 on: May 26, 2018, 01:41:28 am »

In this kind of photography color is a powerful  tool to use.
In B&W I look for claire obscure , graphically impressions, etc.
Color adds the whole enchilada of the color world as the old masters used it in there paintings. Color composition is one of them. ‘Ittens color theory’ is a great help to understand basics.
For me it was a eye opener to start looking at the world in therms of color, not in therms of human interaction or whatever.
I explore this in my recent work, and hope one day to be able to combine this insight with the rest of my photography capabilities.

I refer to Saul Leiter, William Eggleston, Harry Gruyaert and other great colorists.
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Ivophoto

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Re: Street Art
« Reply #50 on: May 26, 2018, 01:53:25 am »

Just a few years ago, when I started taking my photography more seriously (yes, I'm a rookie compared to most of you), I joined a website dedicated to Wisconsin photography. It is mostly landscapes, which I don't do except as a tourist. One of the photographers I met there also does some interesting work which he calls "Photo Impressionism."

https://jayrasmussen.smugmug.com/Central-South-America-For-Sale/PhotoImpressionism/

I like it, so I tried making something similar.


Street Impressions by Gregg Plummer, on Flickr

I think mine looks pretty sloppy and I haven't really done much of this sort of thing since but would still like to learn how.
I like the red spot in the scene and the complementary colors.
I’m lucky to be born in Rubens home town, and few times in a year a go to the Cathedral of Antwerp and take a chair in front of the de-crucifixion of Christ. I blur the painting by looking trough my eyelashes and study the color composition of the master.
Red is very important in color composition, ....

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Ivo_B

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Re: Street Art
« Reply #51 on: May 26, 2018, 02:07:04 am »

(It seems I have a a separate account using Tapatalk..... So, IvoPhoto, it is me: Ivo_B, I will avoid this, sorry)
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petermfiore

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Re: Street Art
« Reply #52 on: May 26, 2018, 07:16:10 am »

One of the greatest masters for everything painting.

Peter

OmerV

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Re: Street Art
« Reply #53 on: May 26, 2018, 07:21:19 am »

Just a few years ago, when I started taking my photography more seriously (yes, I'm a rookie compared to most of you), I joined a website dedicated to Wisconsin photography. It is mostly landscapes, which I don't do except as a tourist. One of the photographers I met there also does some interesting work which he calls "Photo Impressionism."

https://jayrasmussen.smugmug.com/Central-South-America-For-Sale/PhotoImpressionism/

I like it, so I tried making something similar.


Street Impressions by Gregg Plummer, on Flickr

I think mine looks pretty sloppy and I haven't really done much of this sort of thing since but would still like to learn how.

The more I look at this photo, the more I like it. It is street photography, unencumbered by the myopia of trying to wedge the past into the future. Nicely done.

Rob C

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Re: Street Art
« Reply #54 on: May 26, 2018, 08:21:29 am »

The more I look at this photo, the more I like it. It is street photography, unencumbered by the myopia of trying to wedge the past into the future. Nicely done.

Hey, that's a cool throwaway!

How do you wedge anything into what has not yet arrived? Into the present, yes, I could go with that. But the future? Is anybody actively, really attempting that? It would be fun to see.

;-)

RSL

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Re: Street Art
« Reply #55 on: May 26, 2018, 08:43:30 am »

The more I look at this photo, the more I like it. It is street photography, unencumbered by the myopia of trying to wedge the past into the future. Nicely done.

And that's exactly the problem. People look at the photography of HCB, Frank, Winogrand and say: "Interesting historical stuff, but it has nothing much to do with today," thereby missing the point entirely. The point of HCB's stuff isn't its historicity. The point is that he captured important points about the relationships between people and between people and their environment. Photographs that fail to do that don't fit the street genre. But if course, if it has a street in it, it must be street photography. Right?

Rob C

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Re: Street Art
« Reply #56 on: May 26, 2018, 08:57:09 am »

And that's exactly the problem. People look at the photography of HCB, Frank, Winogrand and say: "Interesting historical stuff, but it has nothing much to do with today," thereby missing the point entirely. The point of HCB's stuff isn't its historicity. The point is that he captured important points about the relationships between people and between people and their environment. Photographs that fail to do that don't fit the street genre. But if course, if it has a street in it, it must be street photography. Right?

Yes, Russ, that is the problem.

Which is why I thought it a good idea to start this separate thread of "Street Art", as distinct fom the classical sense of street as we understand it.

In this different context, the image fits perfectly, with a tendency to drift towards the kaleidoscopìc.

The essence of the new thread or, rather, its definition, lies in the making of something unique from the raw marterials of the city street (if you are fortunate enough to have a city!).

Rob

Rob C

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Re: Street Art
« Reply #57 on: May 26, 2018, 09:02:49 am »

Tyre-kicking with a Nikon.

OmerV

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Re: Street Art
« Reply #58 on: May 26, 2018, 09:04:27 am »

Hey, that's a cool throwaway!

How do you wedge anything into what has not yet arrived? Into the present, yes, I could go with that. But the future? Is anybody actively, really attempting that? It would be fun to see.

;-)

Hah, seeing and sensing the future, second by second, is a street photographer’s mystic tool. How many photos of people jumping a puddle do we need? Been there, done that. Photographers show the world what it doesn’t know. Yet.  8)

Of course, photography is not the sole province of the future, as Ireland has just shown us.

Rob C

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Re: Street Art
« Reply #59 on: May 26, 2018, 09:30:26 am »

Hah, seeing and sensing the future, second by second, is a street photographer’s mystic tool. How many photos of people jumping a puddle do we need? Been there, done that. Photographers show the world what it doesn’t know. Yet.  8)

Of course, photography is not the sole province of the future, as Ireland has just shown us.

Indeed, but hardly, HC-B's fault!

A new slant might be discerned by jumping over a mirror, but then that would become accused of being post-derivitive almost as soon as it was published.

What it doesn't know yet? Not exactly; rather what it does know but never before thought interesting.

Ireland? I don't know the final outcome yet - I have been unable to stomach either Sky News or the Beeb long enough this morning to find out. Both stations have become so saccharine sickly sweet that my delicate morning system can't tolerate either.

In their efforts to embrace the lowest common denominator of physical looks, they have turned (especially the Beeb) into their own semi-automatic off-switch. I see the mundane, the unglamorous all around me every day; please, let a little sunshine fall onto these dark corners at least second-hand! We know the world is grim, full of crap; why not permit us those few, treasured moments of glamour that tv could provide were it not so politically correct to the point of parody?

Then the voices; heysoos, the bloody voices! No, I don't come from Birmingham and I don't sound like a sweaty sock either!
« Last Edit: May 26, 2018, 09:36:25 am by Rob C »
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