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Author Topic: The Mirrorless Nikon D850  (Read 11667 times)

Two23

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Re: The Mirrorless Nikon D850
« Reply #20 on: April 05, 2018, 11:43:49 pm »

Auto-focus? Never thought about that. Have not used it in years. LOL. All manual for me, please.


Sometimes I need very fast and competent AF, such as shooting ice races.  Sometimes I don't need AF at all such as my night shots.  I shoot a lot of different camera systems--Nikon FX & DX, 4x5, 5x7,  Leica LTM, and some very sweet pre-WW2 6x9 folders.  I pick the system that best suits the job.  All but one of my Nikon system lenses (the 24mm PC-E) have very excellent AF.  I don't think any of the lenses for my 4x5 Chamonix do, but I could check on that.


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dchew

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Re: The Mirrorless Nikon D850
« Reply #21 on: April 06, 2018, 06:05:53 am »

A very timely article from Thom.

http://www.sansmirror.com/newsviews/the-mirrorless-prisoners.html

Cheers,
Bernard

It is an interesting article, but not a prisoner’s dilemma. The key aspect of a PD is that if the players could collude they would choose a different preferred path. In Thom’s example, there is no path in which Canon or Nikon would choose a different mount vs their existing mount. In every scenario, using the existing mount is the preferred decision.

I don’t know what the big deal is anyway. All they have to do is provide an option to add a legacy lens adapter with the camera purchase, priced at or near the variable cost of producing that adapter.

The assumption being existing Canikon users will want to adapt their captive legacy lenses (that’s the assumption on which Thom’s article is based). Sony’s problem is they don’t have that long legacy of lenses, so they don’t have that option. Sony customers have to pick one or more adapters on their own.

Dave
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BernardLanguillier

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Re: The Mirrorless Nikon D850
« Reply #22 on: April 06, 2018, 06:18:08 am »

All but one of my Nikon system lenses (the 24mm PC-E) have very excellent AF.  I don't think any of the lenses for my 4x5 Chamonix do, but I could check on that.

If the AF of your Chamonix is too slow you may want to have it checked by support.

Cheers,
Bernard

BJL

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The Mirrorless Nikon D850–and real Nikon-Canon mirrorless
« Reply #23 on: April 06, 2018, 06:23:45 pm »

I am mystified by the doubts and worries about what mounts Canon and Nikon will use it and when they offer “EVF” bodies in good old 35mm format. They will do what Sony has done, along with every vaguely successful EVF system from an SLR maker with legacy SLR lenses to support, including Canon in “APS-C” format: a new, far shallower “EVF camera” lens mount that can use all their existing SLR lenses via an adaptor, and can also use a bunch of lenses for other SLR systems by the way. In particular, Canon will use its existing EF-M mount, which is a bit wider that Sony’s E mount and equally deep, and so should handle the larger format just fine. Nikon has even more reason to move on from the F mount.

The idea that avoiding transitional use of an adaptor (which curmudgeons could avoid by gluing the adaptor on permanently and staying with SLR lenses!) outweighs the longer term advantages in lens design and compactness of a new shallower mount (which can also be narrower) makes no technical or competitive sense that me — and apparently not to any SLR maker to make the switch with success beyond a small band of hardcore fans.

Note that video support and such favors New types of AF motors, so there will need to be a bunch of new lenses anyway
« Last Edit: April 06, 2018, 06:29:33 pm by BJL »
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hogloff

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Re: The Mirrorless Nikon D850
« Reply #24 on: April 06, 2018, 06:59:32 pm »

One big thing people are missing is that Canon is in business to make money. They'll release another mount for their mirrorless system, release an adapter to help move exiting lenses onto mirrorless and release a whole new smaller, lighter and optimized lenses for their mirrorless cameras...so they can sell you yet more lenses. Why would they spend all the R&D resources developing new mirrorless technology and not go to the trough for new mirrorless lenses?
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32BT

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Re: The Mirrorless Nikon D850
« Reply #25 on: April 06, 2018, 08:36:54 pm »

. Why would they spend all the R&D resources developing new mirrorless technology and not go to the trough for new mirrorless lenses?

Because then the choice of switching systems suddenly becomes an easy proposition and it wouldn't be a favourable proposition for Canon atm. The reason they cater to professionals is that they would never devalue their customer's investments like that. They may opt for new lenses because modernising the line up may be necessary, but not by forced shocktherapy.
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hogloff

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Re: The Mirrorless Nikon D850
« Reply #26 on: April 06, 2018, 09:49:31 pm »

Because then the choice of switching systems suddenly becomes an easy proposition and it wouldn't be a favourable proposition for Canon atm. The reason they cater to professionals is that they would never devalue their customer's investments like that. They may opt for new lenses because modernising the line up may be necessary, but not by forced shocktherapy.

We are talking about the same Canon now...that overnight pulled the plug on the complete FD line of cameras and lenses...right. No...they won't force any shock therapy onto their customers...been there...done that...and it stung.

I'm not saying they will abandon their existing lenses...they'll make an adapter for the mirrorless platform. But Canon is in business to make money and the best way to make money is to offer something new to their customers...that includes both cameras and lenses. The existing lenses will work OK on the mirrorless cameras...like they work OK on the Sony cameras...but the new mirrorless versions will work just that much better and will be just a little bit lighter and smaller...enticing everyone to sell their old 85 1.4 for the new mirrorless version.

Wait and see...and new line of lenses makes huge business sense.
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32BT

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Re: The Mirrorless Nikon D850
« Reply #27 on: April 07, 2018, 03:20:17 am »

Well, it does raise an interesting question: will either N or C go for an "open source" mount, a la Sony?
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BernardLanguillier

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Re: The Mirrorless Nikon D850
« Reply #28 on: April 07, 2018, 05:35:17 pm »

My guess remains:
- new Nikon mount with short flange distance
- fully open lens mount to enable third parties to quickly help Nikon build a competitive lens portfolio
- 2 ranges of lenses (1/ super high-end never seem before ultra bright, 2/ very compact f2.8 lenses still high end in performance but pretty affordable)
- very advanced adapter with built-in AF module for full compatibility with existing F mount lenses OR second version of the body with this adaptor built-in for rigidity and ruggedness OR both (2 versions and an adaptor). My guess is both.
- open firmware platform with full API published
- full weather proof

Cheers,
Bernard
« Last Edit: April 07, 2018, 05:39:34 pm by BernardLanguillier »
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hogloff

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Re: The Mirrorless Nikon D850
« Reply #29 on: April 07, 2018, 08:08:14 pm »

My guess remains:
- new Nikon mount with short flange distance
- fully open lens mount to enable third parties to quickly help Nikon build a competitive lens portfolio
- 2 ranges of lenses (1/ super high-end never seem before ultra bright, 2/ very compact f2.8 lenses still high end in performance but pretty affordable)
- very advanced adapter with built-in AF module for full compatibility with existing F mount lenses OR second version of the body with this adaptor built-in for rigidity and ruggedness OR both (2 versions and an adaptor). My guess is both.
- open firmware platform with full API published
- full weather proof

Cheers,
Bernard

Nope...lens mount will be closed just like it is for the DSLR system. Why would they change and let others in on the very lucrative lens market. Does not make any business sense to open up their mount...how does Nikon make money from this scenario.

Nikon will release their mirrorless with a new mount, release an adapter which allows their existing lenses to work OK on this new mount...and then start releasing new lenses specifically for the mirrorless system. 
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shadowblade

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Re: The Mirrorless Nikon D850
« Reply #30 on: April 07, 2018, 10:51:43 pm »

Well, it does raise an interesting question: will either N or C go for an "open source" mount, a la Sony?

One thing's for sure - Sony's open mount is an invitation for Sigma to step right up and give their camera (not lens) business a reboot.

Sigma's Foveon has unique capabilities. At base ISO, area-for-area (i.e. 1.5x crop for 1.5x crop) it probably gives a better image than just about any sensor out there, including the D850 and (non-pixel-shifted) A7r3. It's like every shot being a pixel-shift shot, but in a single exposure. But, so far, it's been languishing in consumer-grade crop bodies which don't use it to its full potential (lower-end consumers buying crop bodies being far less likely to buy a good, if specialised tool like Foveon over a general-purpose body) and has essentially been relegated to compact-ish, fixed-lens cameras.

Sony's open mount offers Sigma a way forward. There is now a sizeable number of E-mount users out there, equipped with E-mount lenses. Sigma is now starting to make full-frame E-mount lenses, so they are clearly familiar with the mount.

At the same time. IQ-focused bodies are close to running into a wall. The current A7r3 and D850 do a good job, but are more general-purpose cameras, capable of shooting everything, at both low and high ISOs, than dedicated IQ bodies. Not that they don't have good image quality as it is, but that more could be achieved through the sacrifice of some of their speed and high ISO capability. There are 60-100MP Bayer sensors in the works, but where do you go from there? Once you have a 60-100MP full-frame Bayer sensor, is there much point in increasing it to 120-150MP for the following generation?

But there are other ways to improve low-ISO IQ apart from just increasing resolution. Foveon is one such way - it would have a similar spatial resolution to contemporary 'high-resolution' cameras, but higher colour resolution, and also eliminate most moire and sensor-related colour fringing, but at the cost of high-ISO performance.

Sigma should bring out a full-frame, low-ISO-focused E-mount camera with a Foveon sensor. Probably in the 50-60MP range (the current Quattro sensor would be 44MP scaled to full-frame) with full RGB information for every pixel. They could potentially even go back to the old 1:1:1 pixel architecture, instead of the Quattro's 4:1:1, which improved high-ISO capability at the expense of colour resolution. It would likely not have the AF performance of Sony bodies, nor their video functionality, but that wouldn't be the point of the camera. As a high-end, specialised camera, buyers would know what they're getting into and be buying it for its special capabilities, with full knowledge of its downsides. It's just like no-one buying an Otus lens complains that it can't autofocus - anyone even considering an Otus knows exactly what they're getting and what the point of the lens is.

This new Sigma would occupy a niche at the far end of the IQ-vs-speed curve, which, for full-frame sensors, currently sits unoccupied. It would not be a huge niche, but still substantial - landscape photographers, studio photographers (and anyone else primarily using flash), art reproduction, etc. And Sigma bodies have always been niche anyway - this would probably be substantially less so, with more potential users.

Of course, this opening is also available to Sony, who also have multilayer sensor technology, but have not deployed it as yet. Who knows how mature Sony's multilayer technology is yet, though - Sigma's has been demonstrated and used in production cameras, and could probably be put into a full-frame body sooner than any attempt from Sony. Odds are that the next Sony IQ-focused body will simply be a higher-resolution Bayer sensor (say, 60-80MP) rather than a completely new sensor architecture (although it may include refinements such as a global electronic shutter or pixel-parallel A/D conversion, which are evolutionary steps from what is currently being used). But it would be a possibility for future generations after that, when pixel count is running into diminishing returns. (I'm speaking of final output megapixels here - it can be beneficial for the sensor to have multiple photosites per final pixel, to enable things such as dual/quad-pixel AF, or even the 'light field' camera concept, whose main flaw was that it came 10-15 years ahead of its time, before sensors of sufficient resolution were available and before other elements required for the computed photography approach could catch up).
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shadowblade

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Re: The Mirrorless Nikon D850
« Reply #31 on: April 07, 2018, 11:46:28 pm »

- 2 ranges of lenses (1/ super high-end never seem before ultra bright, 2/ very compact f2.8 lenses still high end in performance but pretty affordable)

This would be almost the dumbest thing Nikon could do, and would likely ensure their relegation to Leica's status, as a niche player in the camera world, with big name cachet but little actual influence or market presence.

Outside of a few enthusiasts with more money than skill, who's going to be buying and using these 'never seen before' 'ultra-bright' lenses? Sigma's f/1.4 lenses not fast enough for you? Even then, they're often used stopped down to f/1.8-f/2 rather than wide-open. Are Nikon going to undercut Sigma? How many f/1.0-f/1.2 lenses do you think Nikon are going to be able to sell, if they end up costing three times as much as the Sigma f/1.4 equivalent (which is probably sharper, due to a less extreme design - there's a reason the Noctilux lenses are the softest of Leica's lenses, despite being the largest and most expensive)?

These are niche lenses for artsy types - niches you fill once you have all the bases covered.

Working photographers mostly live or die by their fast zooms - 24-70/2.8, 70-200/2.8, a UWA (12-24/4, 14-24/2.8, 16-35/2.8 or similar). Action photographers need the superteles - 100-400 (or similar, as backup or a secondary lens for dedication action or as a main telephoto lens for general photography), 200-400/4, 300/2.8, 400/2.8, 500/4, 600/4, 800/5.6. Wedding and portrait photographers may have one or two fast primes at favoured focal lengths for posed portraits - say, two of 35/1.4, 85/1.4, 135/1.8 or 200/2. But no-one shows up to a shoot with a bagful of fast primes, if they could even carry them. And they are unlikely to go for a super-fast f/1.0 or f/1.2 lens, when a good-quality f/1.4 lens already does the job, weighs less and costs less (Sigma).

We've seen these ultra-fast lenses before - f/0.95, f/1, etc. They're super-heavy, super-large, super-expensive and not very sharp. There's a reason no-one makes them any more, outside of a few niche lenses. Bringing them back sounds more like the wishful thinking of an artsy type than the requirements of a photographer or the calculated profit-chasing of a business executive.

Quote
- very advanced adapter with built-in AF module for full compatibility with existing F mount lenses OR second version of the body with this adaptor built-in for rigidity and ruggedness OR both (2 versions and an adaptor). My guess is both.

It would be very uneconomical to produce multiple, substantially different versions of what is essentially the same camera. They may do it for one generation, but not for the next one. It would essentially mirror Sony's A99II, which is essentially an A7r2 designed for A-mount lenses.

Also, any adapter with a PDAF module for full compatibility with current lenses would likely be prohibitively expensive - basically, you'd need to rip out the entire AF system of the D5 or D850, put it into an adapter with an inbuilt mirror and couple up a lot more things between the adapter and body than is necessary for a simple pass-through adapter (including also designing the camera to work with the adapter). Nothing like a Metabones adapter. It would also reduce sensor performance by a third to half a stop, due to the pellicle mirror required (you can't really stick a moving mirror in an adapter. And it still wouldn't be as accurate as the full on-sensor AF approach, due to the adapter's AF sensor and the imaging sensor not being in complete alignment (the reason for AF micro-adjustment on SLRs), although a pellicle mirror design would allow for sensor-based AF to be used for corrections after the adapter had done the large, fast movements. It would likely cost as much as a good lens, unless Nikon decide to subsidise it to smooth the transition process, selling the adapter at no profit, or even at a loss. Which itself has precedent - at the launch of the A7/A7r, Sony were offering Metabones adapters with each A7/A7r body sold.

Quote
- open firmware platform with full API published

Has anyone else done this?

Even the Magic Lantern crew for Canon pretty much had to hack their way in.

Quote
- full weather proof

Depends on the model (everyone will have more than one line of mirrorless cameras) and of marginal utility anyway. I recently shot the A7r3 outdoors for multiple full days in various adverse weather conditions, ranging from tropical rainstorms with 100% humidity, to heavy snow, to seaspray, and never had any issues with it. In actual use, no-one's going to be putting the camera under a shower head for 20 minutes - the photographer will give up before the camera, and you probably won't be shooting much under those conditions anyway, due to poor visibility and raindrops on the front element. If you're covering the lens to stop raindrops on the front element ruining your shot, you're probably also covering the camera, once again rendering the issue moot.
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Two23

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Re: The Mirrorless Nikon D850
« Reply #32 on: April 08, 2018, 12:09:49 am »

Nope...lens mount will be closed just like it is for the DSLR system. Why would they change and let others in on the very lucrative lens market. Does not make any business sense to open up their mount...how does Nikon make money from this scenario.



Of the three lenses I shoot most on my D800E, one is Nikon (24mm PC-E) and two are Sigma ART (35mm & 50mm f1.4).  I would be more interested in any future Nikon camera if I could use my vintage Leica LTM lenses on it.  They are tiny and I love the look they give. :)


Kent in SD
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32BT

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Re: The Mirrorless Nikon D850
« Reply #33 on: April 08, 2018, 05:17:20 am »

I wonder whether the changing lens requirements might perhaps necessitate an open mount. Even the Nikons and Canons of this world can not cater to all the different needs of photographers these days. Cinematic properties are increasingly important and before you finally have all the bases covered, customers may have switched to an open alternative simply because of better choice.

Either way, deadlocking customers into a closed system is really a strategy of the past. What should happen is a true innovation in cost-of-ownershipmodel with circular economy in mind.

As for Foveon: i would have liked to see a version that tries to squeeze even more "colors" from the different depths of silicon. Moving closer to a spectral capture system. That would allow them to cater to the niche market more in line with the cost of development. (Yes, i realize that squeezing 3 colors was stretching it already.)
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Guillermo Luijk

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Re: The Mirrorless Nikon D850
« Reply #34 on: April 08, 2018, 07:20:37 am »

My thought is that it is sad that so many Canikon users (and this is a general opinion not addresed at the OP), need to be able to enjoy a competent Liveview on their DSLR's to just imagine how useful an EVF can be: 100% framing, realtime WB and exposure, highlight/shadow clipping, focus peaking and zoom as MF aids, bye bye front/back focus nightmares,... and how archaic an OVF and therefore the whole DSLR concept are today.

What's the point of paying an extra cost for a pentaprism group and renounce to have Liveview composition on your eye?. Come on, that is insane.

Luckily in the next two years the mirrorless vs DSLR mix will finally crossover 'thanks' to the forthcoming Canikon FF mirrorless. Sad it took such a long time just because Canikon wanted it so, and because most of their followers where not critical enough about the situation. In fact I wonder if those FF releases from Canikon would exist if Sony didn't launch its A7's.



Regards.
« Last Edit: April 08, 2018, 11:41:06 am by Guillermo Luijk »
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hogloff

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Re: The Mirrorless Nikon D850
« Reply #35 on: April 08, 2018, 11:52:17 am »

One thing's for sure - Sony's open mount is an invitation for Sigma to step right up and give their camera (not lens) business a reboot.

Sigma's Foveon has unique capabilities. At base ISO, area-for-area (i.e. 1.5x crop for 1.5x crop) it probably gives a better image than just about any sensor out there, including the D850 and (non-pixel-shifted) A7r3. It's like every shot being a pixel-shift shot, but in a single exposure. But, so far, it's been languishing in consumer-grade crop bodies which don't use it to its full potential (lower-end consumers buying crop bodies being far less likely to buy a good, if specialised tool like Foveon over a general-purpose body) and has essentially been relegated to compact-ish, fixed-lens cameras.

Sony's open mount offers Sigma a way forward. There is now a sizeable number of E-mount users out there, equipped with E-mount lenses. Sigma is now starting to make full-frame E-mount lenses, so they are clearly familiar with the mount.

At the same time. IQ-focused bodies are close to running into a wall. The current A7r3 and D850 do a good job, but are more general-purpose cameras, capable of shooting everything, at both low and high ISOs, than dedicated IQ bodies. Not that they don't have good image quality as it is, but that more could be achieved through the sacrifice of some of their speed and high ISO capability. There are 60-100MP Bayer sensors in the works, but where do you go from there? Once you have a 60-100MP full-frame Bayer sensor, is there much point in increasing it to 120-150MP for the following generation?

But there are other ways to improve low-ISO IQ apart from just increasing resolution. Foveon is one such way - it would have a similar spatial resolution to contemporary 'high-resolution' cameras, but higher colour resolution, and also eliminate most moire and sensor-related colour fringing, but at the cost of high-ISO performance.

Sigma should bring out a full-frame, low-ISO-focused E-mount camera with a Foveon sensor. Probably in the 50-60MP range (the current Quattro sensor would be 44MP scaled to full-frame) with full RGB information for every pixel. They could potentially even go back to the old 1:1:1 pixel architecture, instead of the Quattro's 4:1:1, which improved high-ISO capability at the expense of colour resolution. It would likely not have the AF performance of Sony bodies, nor their video functionality, but that wouldn't be the point of the camera. As a high-end, specialised camera, buyers would know what they're getting into and be buying it for its special capabilities, with full knowledge of its downsides. It's just like no-one buying an Otus lens complains that it can't autofocus - anyone even considering an Otus knows exactly what they're getting and what the point of the lens is.

This new Sigma would occupy a niche at the far end of the IQ-vs-speed curve, which, for full-frame sensors, currently sits unoccupied. It would not be a huge niche, but still substantial - landscape photographers, studio photographers (and anyone else primarily using flash), art reproduction, etc. And Sigma bodies have always been niche anyway - this would probably be substantially less so, with more potential users.

Of course, this opening is also available to Sony, who also have multilayer sensor technology, but have not deployed it as yet. Who knows how mature Sony's multilayer technology is yet, though - Sigma's has been demonstrated and used in production cameras, and could probably be put into a full-frame body sooner than any attempt from Sony. Odds are that the next Sony IQ-focused body will simply be a higher-resolution Bayer sensor (say, 60-80MP) rather than a completely new sensor architecture (although it may include refinements such as a global electronic shutter or pixel-parallel A/D conversion, which are evolutionary steps from what is currently being used). But it would be a possibility for future generations after that, when pixel count is running into diminishing returns. (I'm speaking of final output megapixels here - it can be beneficial for the sensor to have multiple photosites per final pixel, to enable things such as dual/quad-pixel AF, or even the 'light field' camera concept, whose main flaw was that it came 10-15 years ahead of its time, before sensors of sufficient resolution were available and before other elements required for the computed photography approach could catch up).

No one knows exactly what the terms are between Sony and Sigma ( or anyone else ) with regards the E-mount. Maybe Sigma is legally not allowed to develop a camera based on the E-mount. Seems like Sony has some control of what lenses Zeiss is releasing so I would think Sony is not that stupid and just gives everyone who asks full access to the e-mount without conditions.
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SrMi

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Re: The Mirrorless Nikon D850
« Reply #36 on: April 08, 2018, 12:33:23 pm »

My thought is that it is sad that so many Canikon users (and this is a general opinion not addresed at the OP), need to be able to enjoy a competent Liveview on their DSLR's to just imagine how useful an EVF can be: 100% framing, realtime WB and exposure, highlight/shadow clipping, focus peaking and zoom as MF aids, bye bye front/back focus nightmares,... and how archaic an OVF and therefore the whole DSLR concept are today.

What's the point of paying an extra cost for a pentaprism group and renounce to have Liveview composition on your eye?. Come on, that is insane.

Luckily in the next two years the mirrorless vs DSLR mix will finally crossover 'thanks' to the forthcoming Canikon FF mirrorless. Sad it took such a long time just because Canikon wanted it so, and because most of their followers where not critical enough about the situation. In fact I wonder if those FF releases from Canikon would exist if Sony didn't launch its A7's.

Regards.

As someone who regularly shoots with EVF cameras (m43, Sony, Leica CL, X1D) and with OVF cameras (D850, H6D) I strongly disagree. The only reason why I shoot with EVF cameras is the size/weight advantage. To my eyes. looking at an EVF or LCD is vastly inferior to using an OVF (lack of contrast, detail, etc). It is like looking at Google Satellite View vs looking with your eyes from a helicopter with doors off. I understand that other people do not feel that way, but every time I switch from EVF back to OVF it feels so much better, i.e., I feel much more inspired seeing with my own eyes than looking at an LCD. Surprisingly, YMMV :-).

IMO, the main advantage of a mirrorless Nikon is that people who like EVFs would have the option of an ergonomically well designed high megapixel mirrorless full frame camera. If compatible with existing Nikon lenses, it would be a good lightweight backup camera as well.
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Rob C

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Re: The Mirrorless Nikon D850
« Reply #37 on: April 08, 2018, 01:25:02 pm »

How strange that a pentaprism has never been the weak link in my photography.

The weak links are my old eyes and my imagination. No viewfinder makes up for those failures. The very last thing I desire in a viewfinder is information other than parallax-free framing, focussing and, to an extent, an indication of DOF. Nikon and Rolleiflex and Hasselblad did that very well indeed for me for ages before digital was invented. Hell's teeth, I don't even chimp unless I find myself in a room shooting towards a window.

Simplicity without fancy distractions is what I want; others are free to enjoy the process of the toys to their heart's content. It is not about the gadgets, for me, but about the thing in front of the lens. I have a suspicion that holds good for most of us old guys who have been relatively active in photography.

myotis

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Re: The Mirrorless Nikon D850
« Reply #38 on: April 08, 2018, 01:30:20 pm »

I understand that other people do not feel that way, but every time I switch from EVF back to OVF it feels so much better, i.e., I feel much more inspired seeing with my own eyes than looking at an LCD. Surprisingly, YMMV :-).

Nope you are not alone, and I "put up" with the poorer viewing experience of EVF for the other benefits that mirrorless cameras bring. My own mirrorless cameras are a bit on the old side now (and indeed I just got rid of my Panasonic GX7outfit, so I only have my Fujis now), but I rush to check out each new model as they come out, and remain grateful that I still primarily use  DSLRs.

Cheers,
Graham


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BernardLanguillier

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Re: The Mirrorless Nikon D850
« Reply #39 on: April 08, 2018, 04:11:01 pm »

You’ve got to love the very heated reactions generated by the suggestion that Nikon may release a mirrorless system that isn’t a late copycat of what Sony has been doing. ;)

Yet, why on earth would they want to focus on a loosing strategy with me too products? That wouldn’t make much sense would it?

The only reasonnable question is how Nikon can attract potential buyers towards their new mirrorless platform with something truly unique that is better than what Sony is doing. And I don’t believe that “by putting themselves in the skin of a follower” is an objective answer.

That is merely the answer that Sony, and possibly some people afraid of Sony loosing some competitive ground, would love to hear. ;)

And btw, the very same would apply to Canon. The winning strategy would IMHO be the exact same on as the one for Nikon.

Cheers,
Bernard
« Last Edit: April 08, 2018, 07:11:36 pm by BernardLanguillier »
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