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Author Topic: LR Sharpening Settings Closest to Focus Magic  (Read 4820 times)

jed best

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Re: LR Sharpening Settings Closest to Focus Magic
« Reply #20 on: April 03, 2018, 06:57:44 AM »

Hi Bart,

Some help please. Do you both turn off sharpening in C1 except for diffraction correction and place focus magic and Topaz Detail on same layer? In additoin, do you any default settings for Topaz Detail.

Thank you.

Jed Best
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BartvanderWolf

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Re: LR Sharpening Settings Closest to Focus Magic
« Reply #21 on: April 03, 2018, 08:40:58 AM »

Hi Bart,

Some help please. Do you both turn off sharpening in C1 except for diffraction correction and place focus magic and Topaz Detail on same layer? In additoin, do you any default settings for Topaz Detail.

Hi Jed,

I usually keep C1's Diffraction Correction toggled on, because that unifies the look of images that were shot with different apertures. I then switch-off the separate Sharpening settings in the output recipe.

Then in Photoshop (or Affinity Photo) I use an action that creates a duplicate layer, switches it to Luminosity blend mode, and applies a Blend-if that avoids clipping due to sharpening, and starts FocusMagic. I then use the required settings (usually a blur width of 1, or sometimes 2) and an Amount of 100 to 175, depending on the image.

The Topaz Detail settings can be applied to the same Luminosity Blend layer if nothing color specific is required, or on a new Merge Visible layer for full control. The settings for Detail differ with image content and intended use (and viewing distance) of the image, but I often add a bit of small detail (and reduce small detail boost to suppress noise amplification), and some medium detail.

The benefit of applying Detail to the FocusMagic sharpened Layer is that it also already has Blend-if settings, so there is no risk for clipping even if small detail is enhanced, and it avoids file bloat from an additional image layer. The drawback is that it is no longer possible to separate the Capture sharpening from the 'Creative sharpening', so I may need to do it all over for a different use of the same image, instead of just (temporarily) switching off the Detail layer, and creating a new one.

Cheers,
Bart
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jed best

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Re: LR Sharpening Settings Closest to Focus Magic
« Reply #22 on: April 03, 2018, 03:17:56 PM »

Thank you

JEd
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brianrybolt

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Re: LR Sharpening Settings Closest to Focus Magic
« Reply #23 on: April 12, 2018, 05:02:25 AM »

I find that 'Smart Sharpen' is more effective than the preset 'Sharpen - Scenic'.  I use the sliders -to taste-.  I find it quick and easy but wish I didn't have to round trip through PS.
« Last Edit: April 12, 2018, 12:33:10 PM by brianrybolt »
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bjanes

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Re: LR Sharpening Settings Closest to Focus Magic
« Reply #24 on: April 12, 2018, 12:26:56 PM »


Then in Photoshop (or Affinity Photo) I use an action that creates a duplicate layer, switches it to Luminosity blend mode, and applies a Blend-if that avoids clipping due to sharpening, and starts FocusMagic. I then use the required settings (usually a blur width of 1, or sometimes 2) and an Amount of 100 to 175, depending on the image.

The Topaz Detail settings can be applied to the same Luminosity Blend layer if nothing color specific is required, or on a new Merge Visible layer for full control. The settings for Detail differ with image content and intended use (and viewing distance) of the image, but I often add a bit of small detail (and reduce small detail boost to suppress noise amplification), and some medium detail.

The benefit of applying Detail to the FocusMagic sharpened Layer is that it also already has Blend-if settings, so there is no risk for clipping even if small detail is enhanced, and it avoids file bloat from an additional image layer. The drawback is that it is no longer possible to separate the Capture sharpening from the 'Creative sharpening', so I may need to do it all over for a different use of the same image, instead of just (temporarily) switching off the Detail layer, and creating a new one.

Bart,

I would be interested in what blend-if settings you use. In his Image Sharpening, 2nd Ed, page 201, Jeff Schewe recommends the settings shown in the attachment. These may vary according to the specific image being sharpened (shadow and highlight distribution), but these may serve as a starting point. He also adjusts the sliders for both This Layer and Underlying Layer. Some workers adjust the sliders only for This Layer. What do you recommend?

Regards,

Bill
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ErikKaffehr

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Re: LR Sharpening Settings Closest to Focus Magic
« Reply #25 on: April 12, 2018, 12:31:41 PM »

Hi,

It has been around since public Beta three I think...

Best regards
Erik

I didn't even know there was a Scenic Preset!  Obviously I haven't been paying much attention after using LR for a number of years.  :-[ I will have a look and post a section of an image with Focus Magic sharpening compared to the Scenic Preset.  Thanks!
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BartvanderWolf

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Re: LR Sharpening Settings Closest to Focus Magic
« Reply #26 on: April 12, 2018, 12:44:48 PM »

I would be interested in what blend-if settings you use.

Hi Bill,

I use a very simple Blend-if as a starting point (see attachment), and it can be adjusted depending on the actual image content. But it already makes a significant difference as is. These settings are applied to the top layer with the sharpening. Because it's so straight forward, it's easy to adjust.

The top layer, the one with the sharpening, is in effect used unchanged, except for the extremes (which risk clipping). The idea behind it is that when edge contrast is already very high, it doesn't need as much sharpening as the rest of the image.

Cheers,
Bart
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bjanes

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Re: LR Sharpening Settings Closest to Focus Magic
« Reply #27 on: April 12, 2018, 12:55:59 PM »

I use a very simple Blend-if as a starting point (see attachment), and it can be adjusted depending on the actual image content. But it already makes a significant difference as is. These settings are applied to the top layer with the sharpening. Because it's so straight forward, it's easy to adjust.

The top layer, the one with the sharpening, is in effect used unchanged, except for the extremes (which risk clipping). The idea behind it is that when edge contrast is already very high, it doesn't need as much sharpening as the rest of the image.

Bart,

Your reply is very helpful. On the top layer with the sharpening do you use a layer mask, which could include an edge mask?

Thanks,

Bill
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BartvanderWolf

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Re: LR Sharpening Settings Closest to Focus Magic
« Reply #28 on: April 12, 2018, 01:17:11 PM »

Your reply is very helpful. On the top layer with the sharpening do you use a layer mask, which could include an edge mask?

In general I don't use a mask on the top layer, but that is of course not prohibited. For example, in case of noisy sky regions, one can mask those out.

One of the benefits of such a Sharpening layer is that it can be disabled or deleted before downsampling. After downsampling a new sharpening layer can be created. This reduces the risk of creating aliasing artifacts. That's why I created an action to create such a layer.

Cheers,
Bart

P.S. And attached an example of how it can be implemented in Affinity Photo.
« Last Edit: April 12, 2018, 01:34:32 PM by BartvanderWolf »
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Jacob Buchowski

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Re: LR Sharpening Settings Closest to Focus Magic
« Reply #29 on: May 19, 2018, 07:52:56 AM »

Bart et al.,

This is very helpful. From what I gather you use Focus Magic (and Detail) when you first bring the image into PS for editing before you do any creative work (i.e. do you use it primarily as capture sharpening). Please correct me if I'm wrong. The reason why I ask is that I frequently use luminosity masks when I edit my images. If I were to sharpen first, do my creative work to create a master file, and then had to resize the image to create images scaled to print, I would run the risk of creating artifacts due to re-sizing the image. If I created a new sharpening layer after re-sizing, I would then have to re-do the luminosity masks... I guess what I'm really asking is how likely is it in your experience that re-sizing a flattened master file would create aliasing artifacts.

Thank you,
Jacob
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t6b9p

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Re: LR Sharpening Settings Closest to Focus Magic
« Reply #30 on: May 29, 2018, 04:12:26 PM »

Quote
The current implementation of C1 does not offer controls other than on/off. There is a trick that allows to increase or decrease the effect, by manually changing the Aperture value on the Lens Correction tool's 'Movement' tab. So, although we do not have control over individual channels, it might still be worth a try with manual override.

Of course, FocusMagic can be tuned more easily because it's a dedicated sharpening tool, but it needs another (PS plugin aware) Image editing application as a host.

Sorry for the late response.....life got in the way.  Thanks Bart for your suggestion regards sharpening IR830 in C1.
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peterwgallagher

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Re: LR Sharpening Settings Closest to Focus Magic
« Reply #31 on: May 30, 2018, 05:28:43 AM »

I use FM in Photoshop but I’m cautious about the results because the default 100% mode for ‘out of focus blur’ on a .tif can be sort of aggressive. If not using a ‘smart object’ image, I make a new layer, so I can back off the opacity of the FM-sharpened layer. Incidentally, FM can be used with Smart Objects if you use the “EnableAllPluginsForSmartFilters.jsx” (Google) plugin.

I find that LR (that acc. to Martin Evening sharpens using luminance information to avoid color shifts) can be just as good. I use an OLY EMD OM-1 MkII (µ4/3). By trial and error, using the ALT key method, I have found that an my images that are otherwise in good focus can benefit from sharpening set to a radius of about 1.1 with a modest amount (60-75) and detail set above the 25 threshold in LR (I use a starting preset of 35). Masking is completely image dependent.

But for less-than-sharp focus, or for high ISO images, I first try a HIRALOAM approach, setting radius to about 2.6-2.8 with an amount of 25-30 and detail less than the 25 de-convolution threshold.

Of course, these are settings for images to be displayed on screen. When printing I follow J Schewe’s advice and accept the LR default print-sharpening settings.



 
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