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Author Topic: Short Term Studio Setup  (Read 916 times)

JoeKitchen

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Short Term Studio Setup
« on: February 15, 2018, 09:24:04 AM »

This post is referring to the same short term job I have described in the previous one I posted. 

Short Term Employment ...

So once again I did not have time to figure out the actual costs for this project and just shot high.  For this job I would need a studio large enough to set up 4 to 5 photo sets, room for an on-site manager's work station, and storage for 1200 to 2500 products.  My thoughts are that the studio would need to be 8000 to 10,000 sf.  To rent an already functioning studio of this size would be about $3500 per day in the locale this would take place.

This is the cost that I used but is pretty high over the duration of the shoot. 

My producer and I feel, if the shoot happens, we would be able to secure a short term lease of a warehouse for about $6K to $10K per month, plus utilities. 

There are a few things that concern me.  First, are warehouses expensive to heat and cool?  If the electrical bill was $5K a month, this would still be reasonable here, however if it gets into five figures per month then it may be too expensive. 

Second, is it possible to find a warehouse that already has bathrooms installed?  I am not sure if I could incur this fee.  A mild renovation would be fine, but not fully installing one.  I also realize I would need to install a small kitchenette with running water, but this would be relatively easy to do. 

Last, is it economical to install an alarm system for a couple of months? 
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Joe Kitchen
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"Photography is one percent inspiration and ninety-nine percent moving furniture."  Arnold Newman
“Don't bother just to be better than your contemporaries or predecessors. Try to be better than yourself.”  William Faulkner

Miles

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Re: Short Term Studio Setup
« Reply #1 on: February 15, 2018, 10:46:13 AM »

Most warehouses offer dry storage at minimal cost and may not have good (or any) heating or cooling.  Heating and/or cooling of a large area is expensive thus you will need to consider the location and ambient temperatures for the time of year, plus whether you are willing to operate in a range of temperatures since the system may not fully handle the temperature extremes, especially if it is a poorly insulated building. You may want to consider whether you need the complete area temperature controlled, or only a portion.

Many warehouses have minimal facilities, maybe the size of a closet.  After all, the facilities are intended for storage.

Your needs will best be met by shopping around to see what is available with a security system.  You may be able to rent a vacant warehouse that has been sitting unused for months for a steal. 

Also make sure to take into account the environment.  Dust could be a problem depending your needs.

Good luck.

Miles

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JoeKitchen

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Re: Short Term Studio Setup
« Reply #2 on: February 15, 2018, 12:11:29 PM »

Thanks.

Dust is really a concern too. 
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Joe Kitchen
www.josephmkitchen.com

"Photography is one percent inspiration and ninety-nine percent moving furniture."  Arnold Newman
“Don't bother just to be better than your contemporaries or predecessors. Try to be better than yourself.”  William Faulkner

tcphoto1

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Re: Short Term Studio Setup
« Reply #3 on: February 15, 2018, 02:13:41 PM »

Why limit yourself to warehouses? I would start looking for lofts, condos or houses with enough space or rooms that could fit the production. The cost of utilities would be lower and the space would be clean to start with. I found that heating and cooling averaged $100 a month per 1000 sq ft with extreme hot and cold month being twice the average. It had 12 foot ceilings in those spaces and polished cement floors. Find a space and offer payment in advance and odds are the owner will accept a short term lease.
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JoeKitchen

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Re: Short Term Studio Setup
« Reply #4 on: February 15, 2018, 02:22:49 PM »

Why limit yourself to warehouses? I would start looking for lofts, condos or houses with enough space or rooms that could fit the production. The cost of utilities would be lower and the space would be clean to start with. I found that heating and cooling averaged $100 a month per 1000 sq ft with extreme hot and cold month being twice the average. It had 12 foot ceilings in those spaces and polished cement floors. Find a space and offer payment in advance and odds are the owner will accept a short term lease.

Now that is a great idea.  I was thinking about needing to put an 8x8 with an ultra-bounce above each set, but what a headache and safety issue.  White ceilings in a house work much better. 

Now, zoning laws and how to get shipments in residential location. 

Actually on second thought, I think zoning laws would become an issue and this is not an operation I could run under the radar in a residential area. 
« Last Edit: February 15, 2018, 02:47:38 PM by JoeKitchen »
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Joe Kitchen
www.josephmkitchen.com

"Photography is one percent inspiration and ninety-nine percent moving furniture."  Arnold Newman
“Don't bother just to be better than your contemporaries or predecessors. Try to be better than yourself.”  William Faulkner
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