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Author Topic: NEC PA-243w  (Read 4752 times)

Chris L

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Re: NEC PA-243w
« Reply #20 on: February 08, 2018, 11:33:35 am »

My 24-inch NEC monitor, a venerable PA-241w, has reached the end of its useful life,

sorry to go off topic but how do you know when your monitor has gone bad? I have a NEC PA 241 W thats ten years old probably and it seems fine but I've wondered; unless something major happens, when do I need to replace this? How would I know that it is no longer accurate?
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Chris Kern

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Re: NEC PA-243w
« Reply #21 on: February 08, 2018, 12:37:32 pm »

sorry to go off topic but how do you know when your monitor has gone bad? I have a NEC PA 241 W thats ten years old probably and it seems fine but I've wondered; unless something major happens, when do I need to replace this? How would I know that it is no longer accurate?

The panel on mine had developed a large blemish in one corner.  I noticed it after a move to a new house, and suspect the monitor was mishandled by the movers.  The display still calibrated fine, but I was tired of staring at the ugly blemish.  I'm still using it, but no longer for editing: it is now attached to an old computer in my basement whose only function is to drive a photo printer.

whatsnwsisyphus

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Re: NEC PA-243w
« Reply #22 on: April 22, 2019, 05:58:19 pm »

I thought I would add some notes here since it's one of the only resources that comes up on the pa243. I have the pa242 and the 243 side by side at the moment:
- Both in presets and post calibration they appear very different to the human eye (and to the camera). Colorimetrically they measure similarly but a spectral measurement shows the difference. This is is likely due to the broader blue output of the GBR backlight on the 242. Considering this, I would not use them in setups where they are supposed to behave similarly for the same person. Comparing it to various devices that measure close to to d65 like phones and tablets, the wled 243 seems closer while the 242 appears yellow/green
- The Pa243 has the more traditional anti-glare that you might remember from displays of ole. This makes it less reflective, but also adds some graininess to the image which is visible over smooth tones like skies. This combined with the panel causes some screen door effect for those who are extra sensitive to that (particularly in blues and yellows)
- While neither has an A-TW polarizer (keep wishing), the 243 has a little less of 'ips glow'. The color shifts are also less severe compared to the pa242 that displays a bit of a pinched panel look on the edges
- I can only speak to this copy but the pa243 is more even with uniformity turned off
- I cannot find anything authoritative on panel bit depth being 8+2FRC/10Bit on either. They both support 10bit input.

It has a USB 3.0 Hub and overall is a lot more sleek with a thinner chassis  and a slimmer, circular base and stand. There are less seams, the back of the display curves out on the section that contains the board. There is also more advanced PIP/multi computer with audio processing allowing aux/hdmi/displayport audio to be mixed out to an aux out in switching between sources (not much use in a photo studio, but thought I'd note).

Here is a tif file that shows the vertical banding, also, I must add that there is a ridiculous shift in color after waking up from sleep, I've not had a display in the last decade that shifts this much. It starts with the grayscale at a full green sepia.
https://www.dropbox.com/s/2c9i9nt0p2nxgyr/pa243stripes.tif?dl=1 (to test if you see striping pattern sort of like gif dithering, blue and orange patches most prominent)
« Last Edit: April 25, 2019, 01:13:01 am by whatsnwsisyphus »
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