Pages: 1 2 [3] 4   Go Down

Author Topic: Light for print viewing  (Read 15095 times)

digitaldog

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 20108
  • Andrew Rodney
    • http://www.digitaldog.net/
Re: Light for print viewing
« Reply #40 on: November 21, 2017, 10:44:00 am »

Oh and while we are on the subject of color analysis (or lack thereof), can you explain this?




Digital Color Meter set two ways compared to Photoshop's values directly. 3x3 sample in the same area of color.
Two differing values from DCM (which is correct?). One correct value from actual downloaded image (which is and was uploaded in Adobe RGB (1998)) shown in Photoshop with the same 3x3 sample.

It is of course a number game Tim. The correct numbers are often appreciated by those who understand what they tell us.  ;D
Logged
Author “Color Management for Photographers" & "Photoshop CC Color Management" on pluralsight.com

Tim Lookingbill

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2436
Re: Light for print viewing
« Reply #41 on: November 21, 2017, 06:30:09 pm »

I finally got Colormunki Display to write a profile with an x, y color temp number that falls in the 6500K region on Andrew's Plankian Locus diagram he used to demonstrate the color temp results from different brands of display profile/calibration packages.

I didn't back off my red and blue gains far enough so I set them from their default R50,G50,B50 to R45,G50,B45, increased brightness and the xy numbers landed right next to the i1Display's 6500K results on the Plankian Locus xy diagram. Letting some time pass for adaptation to kick in I've got a somewhat neutral looking display though slightly bluish green. Unfortunately the profile's gamut was slightly reduced.

Another PITA now is when I have daylight streaming in through my windows the display looks ruddy greenish yellow so I set the gains back to the way it was with a more neutral white and gray at R50,G50,B47 and the ruddy look is reduced.

Oddly, doing all this didn't have much of an impact on changing the colors of my images like I thought it would. Adaptation is quite handy.
Logged

digitaldog

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 20108
  • Andrew Rodney
    • http://www.digitaldog.net/
Re: Light for print viewing
« Reply #42 on: November 21, 2017, 06:33:43 pm »

Adaptation is quite handy.
And further you believe your ColorMunki does the same. Sad. Time wasted instead of seeing how your examples with the Digital Color Meter are fooling you.
I wrote:
Oh and while we are on the subject of color analysis (or lack thereof), can you explain this?
Seems not.  :P
Logged
Author “Color Management for Photographers" & "Photoshop CC Color Management" on pluralsight.com

digitaldog

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 20108
  • Andrew Rodney
    • http://www.digitaldog.net/
Re: Light for print viewing
« Reply #43 on: November 21, 2017, 06:34:39 pm »

I finally got Colormunki Display to write a profile with an x, y color temp number that falls in the 6500K region on Andrew's Plankian Locus diagram he used to demonstrate the color temp results from different brands of display profile/calibration packages.
Andrew's Plankian Locus diagram: Andrew who?
Damn another question that will go unanswered: sorry!
Logged
Author “Color Management for Photographers" & "Photoshop CC Color Management" on pluralsight.com

Tim Lookingbill

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2436
Re: Light for print viewing
« Reply #44 on: November 21, 2017, 08:09:01 pm »

This Plankian Locus, Andrew...

I used to resort to finding the math calculation transform from x,y to Kelvin online until it dawned on me you supplied the diagram that maps it visually. This is the screenshot of Photoshop Color Settings' CustomRGB of my greenish WB display profile plotting where it falls roughly on the color temp arc on your Plankian Locus diagram you've posted over at Photo.net.

« Last Edit: November 21, 2017, 08:13:45 pm by Tim Lookingbill »
Logged

digitaldog

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 20108
  • Andrew Rodney
    • http://www.digitaldog.net/
Re: Light for print viewing
« Reply #45 on: November 21, 2017, 08:16:04 pm »

This Plankian Locus, Andrew...
Not mine. Which Andrew are you referring to (opps, another question: sorry)
That screen capture (from THIS web site*) is clearly not clear to you as to what it shows and more importantly why.
Quote
I used to resort to finding the math calculation transform from x,y to Kelvin online until it dawned on me you supplied the diagram that maps it visually. This is the screenshot of Photoshop Color Settings' CustomRGB of my greenish WB display profile plotting where it falls roughly on the color temp arc on your Plankian Locus diagram you've posted over at Photo.net.
The key word above is roughly. Like the results you provided from the Digital Color Meter. Great.


* http://forum.luminous-landscape.com/index.php?topic=103094.msg845726#msg845726
Logged
Author “Color Management for Photographers" & "Photoshop CC Color Management" on pluralsight.com

Tim Lookingbill

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2436
Re: Light for print viewing
« Reply #46 on: November 21, 2017, 08:23:45 pm »

And here's the very first profile made of the LG27in. in 2013 with display RGB gains at R51,G50,B47 where it gave an exact reading of 6500K in Photoshop Color Settings' CustomRGB.

Maybe the colorimeter is drifting.

The Andrew I'm referring to is you or do you have a problem using your real name. From your past behavior it's no wonder you don't want to use your real name.
Logged

digitaldog

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 20108
  • Andrew Rodney
    • http://www.digitaldog.net/
Re: Light for print viewing
« Reply #47 on: November 21, 2017, 08:32:33 pm »

And here's the very first profile made of the LG27in. in 2013 with display RGB gains at R51,G50,B47 where it gave an exact reading of 6500K in Photoshop Color Settings' CustomRGB.
So what?
Quote
Maybe the colorimeter is drifting.
Maybe, probably not.
Got any idea how to alter the settings in whatever product you use (if possible) to alter settings to produce what none of us yet know what you want from your calibration? Wasn't you who brought up the factory calibration of your display; if it isn't massive marketing hype, why not stick with it? Oh, another question who's answer might prove embarrassing: sorry.
Quote
The Andrew I'm referring to is you or do you have a problem using your real name. From your past behavior it's no wonder you don't want to use your real name.
First, you got the wrong guy; that isn't my image. Unlike perhaps some here, I don't take credit for work I didn't produce. 2nd, I have zero problem using my real name and if you study the 12 thousand post just here, you'll see my name!

3rd, it's time for me to move on unless you must type more misinformation to others. You're all over the map here, can't answer simple questions about your writings and really need to spend more time studying the topic before posting more. Just the odd analysis (If I can be so kind) using the Digital Color Meter and assuming you know what kind of light was used from a JPEG is just over the top and kind of belongs on a forum that's more dedicated to fiction. Again, hopefully for the last time: sorry!
Logged
Author “Color Management for Photographers" & "Photoshop CC Color Management" on pluralsight.com

Tim Lookingbill

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2436
Re: Light for print viewing
« Reply #48 on: November 21, 2017, 08:46:35 pm »

Bye, Andrew.

I take it this isn't you and you didn't post the Plankian Locus diagram...

https://www.photo.net/discuss/threads/shopping-for-an-editing-monitor.5504480/
« Last Edit: November 21, 2017, 08:51:44 pm by Tim Lookingbill »
Logged

pearlstreet

  • Guest
Re: Light for print viewing
« Reply #49 on: November 29, 2017, 02:44:30 pm »

I received my solux light today and it's great. I got the extendable light. This is  meant to be an art light not a task light but it is working well for me. If you can't clamp the light close to the print, it won't work well as the clamp restricts the lamp movement. The light quality is great. My husband is going to build something for me to add track lighting over the cabinet.

https://www.solux.net/cgi-bin/tlistore/clampon.html

Iphone shot of the setup now.
« Last Edit: November 29, 2017, 04:08:10 pm by Sharon VL »
Logged

pearlstreet

  • Guest
Re: Light for print viewing
« Reply #50 on: November 29, 2017, 02:47:57 pm »

Iphone shot of the lit print.
Logged

digitaldog

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 20108
  • Andrew Rodney
    • http://www.digitaldog.net/
Re: Light for print viewing
« Reply #51 on: November 29, 2017, 02:48:04 pm »

Logged
Author “Color Management for Photographers" & "Photoshop CC Color Management" on pluralsight.com

digitaldog

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 20108
  • Andrew Rodney
    • http://www.digitaldog.net/
Re: Light for print viewing
« Reply #52 on: November 29, 2017, 02:49:12 pm »

I received my solux light today and it's great. I got the extendable light. This is  meant to be an art light not a task light but it is working well for me. If you can't clamp the light close to the print, it won't work well as the camp restricts the lamp movement. The light quality is great. My husband is going to build something for me to add track lighting over the cabinet.
Yes the quality is amazing. What CCT (temp) did you end up with?
Logged
Author “Color Management for Photographers" & "Photoshop CC Color Management" on pluralsight.com

pearlstreet

  • Guest
Re: Light for print viewing
« Reply #53 on: November 29, 2017, 02:51:14 pm »

I went with the 4700.
Logged

digitaldog

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 20108
  • Andrew Rodney
    • http://www.digitaldog.net/
Re: Light for print viewing
« Reply #54 on: November 29, 2017, 02:51:43 pm »

I went with the 4700.
That's what I use and recommend.
Logged
Author “Color Management for Photographers" & "Photoshop CC Color Management" on pluralsight.com

pearlstreet

  • Guest
Re: Light for print viewing
« Reply #55 on: November 29, 2017, 02:52:34 pm »

That's what I use and recommend.

Thanks for all your help, Andrew.
Logged

Doug Gray

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2184
Re: Light for print viewing
« Reply #56 on: November 29, 2017, 04:58:50 pm »

Thanks for all your help, Andrew.

What has gone unmentioned in this discussion is that the print quality is a function of both the illuminant and the printer's ink spectral absorbance. The limited ceramic color set used for CRI or even larger sets doesn't address the issue of the printer's ink response. And that's the only set of colors that matter when viewing prints.

The best measure of an illuminant for print viewing, be it a fluorescent, LED, or incandescent is how it interacts with the printer's ink being used. There are ways to do this but it's somewhat involved and requires some programming. That said, the current state of the art in fluorescent and LED lights gives Solux the edge regardless of ink.
Logged

digitaldog

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 20108
  • Andrew Rodney
    • http://www.digitaldog.net/
Re: Light for print viewing
« Reply #57 on: November 29, 2017, 06:21:39 pm »

That said, the current state of the art in fluorescent and LED lights gives Solux the edge regardless of ink.
I've yet to see anything (print made with ink or otherwise) that didn't look lovely under a Solux.
Logged
Author “Color Management for Photographers" & "Photoshop CC Color Management" on pluralsight.com

Doug Gray

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2184
Re: Light for print viewing
« Reply #58 on: November 29, 2017, 06:39:11 pm »

I've yet to see anything (print made with ink or otherwise) that didn't look lovely under a Solux.

Oh, I've got some, but the problem isn't the lamp.  ;D

But, yeah, it's going to be a while before LEDs or fluorescents reach Solux though they are a lot closer. Especially LEDs which used to be quite awful.
Logged

Ryan Mack

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 211
    • Ryan Mack on Facebook
Re: Light for print viewing
« Reply #59 on: December 06, 2017, 09:20:38 am »

I purchased a SoLux proofing kit with 4 5000K bulbs. After assembling it and plugging it in here’s something burning/vaporizing off the bulbs. I never touched the bulbs or fixtures with bare hands, only my paper handling gloves. Is this normal? Also their web site says the 5000K bulbs are rated for 100 hours while the 4700K bulbs are rated for 4000 hours. That 40x difference can’t be right, can it?
« Last Edit: December 06, 2017, 09:24:08 am by Mackman »
Logged
Pages: 1 2 [3] 4   Go Up