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Author Topic: Good Beginners Software for Editing  (Read 6974 times)

Dinarius

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Re: Good Beginners Software for Editing
« Reply #20 on: November 08, 2017, 04:14:10 AM »

If one is just starting out in motion picture editing, I think FCPx or Adobe Premiere are a good place to start.  They don't require heavy computer horsepower like Resolve and are kind of industry standards.  Why learn some obscure software that nobody else uses?

I think because one brings up the Mac v Windows issue, and the other brings up the subscription issue which a lot of people, myself included, don't like.

D.
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fredjeang2

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Re: Good Beginners Software for Editing
« Reply #21 on: November 08, 2017, 09:42:38 AM »

I think because one brings up the Mac v Windows issue, and the other brings up the subscription issue which a lot of people, myself included, don't like.

D.

Agree. The subscription-only formula is a bit of an hassle. I don't like not not have choice.
Then maybe Blackmagic is your way.
If you're on PC, you have 3 other alternatives: Edius, Avid and Lightworks.

Lightworks works smooth now for short form since they have added an interface
That won't scare newcommers. But it is more really aimed towards film, long form editorial.
They also have an all integrated impressive system for TV live coverage with servers etc...
Built arround it called Flow; but it's way beyond the range of independant film makers.

Edius from GrassValley is solid and easy to use. They use it on TV but more in Asia.

Avid would be my best bet as a Resolve alternative, specially with
Baselight. But it's more expensive than Resolve.

So in the end, Resolve seems to be your best choice if you don't
Want the subscription system.
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Dinarius

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Re: Good Beginners Software for Editing
« Reply #22 on: November 08, 2017, 09:47:44 AM »

Agree. The subscription-only formula is a bit of an hassle. I don't like not not have choice.
Then maybe Blackmagic is your way.
If you're on PC, you have 3 other alternatives: Edius, Avid and Lightworks.

Lightworks works smooth now for short form since they have added an interface
That won't scare newcommers. But it is more really aimed towards film, long form editorial.
They also have an all integrated impressive system for TV live coverage with servers etc...
Built arround it called Flow; but it's way beyond the range of independant film makers.

Edius from GrassValley is solid and easy to use. They use it on TV but more in Asia.

Avid would be my best bet as a Resolve alternative, specially with
Baselight. But it's more expensive than Resolve.

So in the end, Resolve seems to be your best choice if you don't
Want the subscription system.

Thanks for that.

I've been playing with Resolve for about a week now. Really starting to like it.

D.

Ps. I wish I knew how to match footage with different aspect ratios! My only problem so far.
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fredjeang2

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Re: Good Beginners Software for Editing
« Reply #23 on: November 08, 2017, 05:39:41 PM »



If money is an issue you can buy a tangent wave console for 1/4 the price and learn to grade, so you donít need bmís console.

Or buy the tiny one.  Personally I have both and both have issues.



Interesting cause I had a view on those. What are your thoughts?
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bcooter

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Re: Good Beginners Software for Editing
« Reply #24 on: November 08, 2017, 07:01:00 PM »

Interesting cause I had a view on those. What are your thoughts?

It depends on how much grading your doing, how deep etc.

The Wave is good, though mine is pretty large given the controls do not take up much space on the board, so youíll need a deep desk, or if you keep going back and forth youíll do a lot of scooting around.

The cheapest tangent  is the ripple at $350 and like everything in the imaging world can go up to astronomical prices.

I think the bm micro panel at $1,000 might do all you want.

Find a rental house and they might help you out.

IMO

BC

fredjeang2

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Re: Good Beginners Software for Editing
« Reply #25 on: November 20, 2017, 04:38:47 PM »


Donít get me wrong, resolve is not a bad editorial system, not great but ok and as DF says the best color engine in the biz.


I gave it a second look in what editorial is concerned and it's not that bad indeed once one gets into it. It gets the job done.
I don't see it for massive/creative editorial because there are better and more specialized platforms for that (after all it is primary a color app), but...I admit that it works well as an all-in-one.

PS: another thing I discovered is that Premiere (I do not like the cloud business model...) had before speedgrade for color (she was hot!) and they removed it, integrated now into the editor itself under the oscur terminology of Lumetri. It's quite good actualy, with tracking tools, shapes, HSL etc...all the tools for color. So step by step Adobe also goes sort of all-in-one.
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bcooter

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Re: Good Beginners Software for Editing
« Reply #26 on: November 25, 2017, 05:51:28 PM »

I gave it a second look in what editorial is concerned and it's not that bad indeed once one gets into it. It gets the job done.
I don't see it for massive/creative editorial because there are better and more specialized platforms for that (after all it is primary a color app), but...I admit that it works well as an all-in-one.

This thread is covering a lot of territory, from cameras, to color to editorial suites.

My thoughts on all of this itís personal. 

But to give my bottom line on my long (sorry for that) reply is I can edit well in Resolve.   

I know people new to editorial love FCPX, In fact I know people that went straight from fcp to X, fought through the learning curve and love it.   People new to editorial have no muscle memory and the long learning curve on other NLEís.  People coming from traditional NLEís and the functions, naming, workflow seem to have more problems with X.

I do like Xís browser, but the rest makes me spend more time thinking of the system rather than the story and we all know editorial is the final rewrite of the story, or better put it is the story.

I still love FCP 7 because of my experience with it, tried like crazy to be comfortable with X, can make it work, but it drives me crazy.    Premier works ok, itís not my favorite mostly because I donít find it 100% stable in my Macs and secondly I donít like subscription models.

Last week, I had a 1 hour conversation with a company that specialized in building custom computers for post production and they are configuring one for me now.    Apple or PC I would strongly suggest going to a company that specializes in video systems.   They might be a little higher than buying from a direct source, but they know what professional post production is, the issues of delivering 4k and the company I deal with didnít try to sell me up, in fact they sold me down, to get the system I needed, not the one I originally wanted.  Same with internal and external drives, especially in reliability and speed.

They said when FCPX came out along with Adobeís pay as you go system, they had customers downgrade their operating system, so they could run Premier 5 (maybe 6 donít remember), so the editors could own the software in their computer(s). 

Iíve always worked in Resolve for colour but now with v12.5 and v14, I find Resolve to be a good editorial system, much better than I thought even a few weeks ago.

For anyone new to resolve, I suggest taking 5 clips, do a quick edit and test ALL of the settings on ingest, editing, colour, gamma then output.   Also use the fastest ssds you can and as much video ram as possible.

I know in editorial weíre suppose to think of the edit first, regardless of colour and looks, but we are all visual people and dropping almost any file into resolve and itís colour engine, out of the box gives you the prettiest look of anything Iíve used.

Itís also nice to stay in the same system and do a quick one light color adjustment, even on the first edit, because with a lot of clientís you can tell them to look at the story and weíll go to finish once the edit is locked.  They always say ďsureĒ but always make a comment on colour so I make sure even at the first edit, the colour is good.*

I have a lot of respect for Black Magic and  more than anyone seems to put a lot of effort into offering a complete front to back eco system at very good prices.   

Now with cameras, I have a lot of them, too many, love my R1ís though on this recent project used a 1dxII and the REDís.   Canon doesnít get much love on these forums, but the colour and depth of the 1dx II files are way beyond what any 4:2:2 8 bit camera should produce.   

Most dp/operators donít like the dslr form factor, but doing a combo project with motion and stills I canít think of a better camera and Canon colour is really good.  In fact most of the dpís I know that reluctantly have moved from film to digital, prefer the Arri and I must admit for cinema work the color, the lack of casting, the whole system is extrodinary.

The downside is huge files that will burn through C-fastII cards quickly and the files are huge, but itís a workhorse for this type of project.

I donít want to get ahead of myself and jink this, but weíre up for a good budgeted, great scripted movie.    The best visual script Iíve read in 10 years.  Once the green light is set, Iím going to test Alexa, My RED MX, a RED dragon and helium, and for grins throw in a Canon C300 or 500.  I have a feeling that the Alexa will produce the look weíre aiming for, but Iím positive my MX REDs will be on set. 

Once again itís all personal, what Iím shooting, who Iím working for and I try to always keep in mind the most important have fun start to finish, that and stay hydrated.

If youíre a small shop, a do it yourself type of person, you learn quick that pre and post are so important and if done right the shoot day seems easy in comparison.   Iím lucky that I work with my wife who is the producer, sometimes the stylist/prop master and though she has little time on set, does the best makeup Iíve ever seen, but the cool part is if I shoot something she likes she doesnít say much, but I can feel it, same with something she doesnít like.   Then she never says a word, but I can feel in a minute if she doesnít and sheís always been right.

IMO

BC

*We just finished a commercial, working with a CD that was new to video (motion).   This person was fixated on things I didnít think was important when I viewed the piece in whole, but listening to the comments I realized the CD who was use to still photography, was looking at each cut frame by frame, like it was a still shoot.

In the recut, I selected sections that could be viewed that way, frame by frame and it was approved in an hour.

fredjeang2

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Re: Good Beginners Software for Editing
« Reply #27 on: November 25, 2017, 07:42:20 PM »

This thread is covering a lot of territory, from cameras, to color to editorial suites.

My thoughts on all of this itís personal. 

But to give my bottom line on my long (sorry for that) reply is I can edit well in Resolve.   

I know people new to editorial love FCPX, In fact I know people that went straight from fcp to X, fought through the learning curve and love it.   People new to editorial have no muscle memory and the long learning curve on other NLEís.  People coming from traditional NLEís and the functions, naming, workflow seem to have more problems with X.

I do like Xís browser, but the rest makes me spend more time thinking of the system rather than the story and we all know editorial is the final rewrite of the story, or better put it is the story.

I still love FCP 7 because of my experience with it, tried like crazy to be comfortable with X, can make it work, but it drives me crazy.    Premier works ok, itís not my favorite mostly because I donít find it 100% stable in my Macs and secondly I donít like subscription models.

Last week, I had a 1 hour conversation with a company that specialized in building custom computers for post production and they are configuring one for me now.    Apple or PC I would strongly suggest going to a company that specializes in video systems.   They might be a little higher than buying from a direct source, but they know what professional post production is, the issues of delivering 4k and the company I deal with didnít try to sell me up, in fact they sold me down, to get the system I needed, not the one I originally wanted.  Same with internal and external drives, especially in reliability and speed.

They said when FCPX came out along with Adobeís pay as you go system, they had customers downgrade their operating system, so they could run Premier 5 (maybe 6 donít remember), so the editors could own the software in their computer(s). 

Iíve always worked in Resolve for colour but now with v12.5 and v14, I find Resolve to be a good editorial system, much better than I thought even a few weeks ago.

For anyone new to resolve, I suggest taking 5 clips, do a quick edit and test ALL of the settings on ingest, editing, colour, gamma then output.   Also use the fastest ssds you can and as much video ram as possible.

I know in editorial weíre suppose to think of the edit first, regardless of colour and looks, but we are all visual people and dropping almost any file into resolve and itís colour engine, out of the box gives you the prettiest look of anything Iíve used.

Itís also nice to stay in the same system and do a quick one light color adjustment, even on the first edit, because with a lot of clientís you can tell them to look at the story and weíll go to finish once the edit is locked.  They always say ďsureĒ but always make a comment on colour so I make sure even at the first edit, the colour is good.*

I have a lot of respect for Black Magic and  more than anyone seems to put a lot of effort into offering a complete front to back eco system at very good prices.   

Now with cameras, I have a lot of them, too many, love my R1ís though on this recent project used a 1dxII and the REDís.   Canon doesnít get much love on these forums, but the colour and depth of the 1dx II files are way beyond what any 4:2:2 8 bit camera should produce.   

Most dp/operators donít like the dslr form factor, but doing a combo project with motion and stills I canít think of a better camera and Canon colour is really good.  In fact most of the dpís I know that reluctantly have moved from film to digital, prefer the Arri and I must admit for cinema work the color, the lack of casting, the whole system is extrodinary.

The downside is huge files that will burn through C-fastII cards quickly and the files are huge, but itís a workhorse for this type of project.

I donít want to get ahead of myself and jink this, but weíre up for a good budgeted, great scripted movie.    The best visual script Iíve read in 10 years.  Once the green light is set, Iím going to test Alexa, My RED MX, a RED dragon and helium, and for grins throw in a Canon C300 or 500.  I have a feeling that the Alexa will produce the look weíre aiming for, but Iím positive my MX REDs will be on set. 

Once again itís all personal, what Iím shooting, who Iím working for and I try to always keep in mind the most important have fun start to finish, that and stay hydrated.

If youíre a small shop, a do it yourself type of person, you learn quick that pre and post are so important and if done right the shoot day seems easy in comparison.   Iím lucky that I work with my wife who is the producer, sometimes the stylist/prop master and though she has little time on set, does the best makeup Iíve ever seen, but the cool part is if I shoot something she likes she doesnít say much, but I can feel it, same with something she doesnít like.   Then she never says a word, but I can feel in a minute if she doesnít and sheís always been right.

IMO

BC

*We just finished a commercial, working with a CD that was new to video (motion).   This person was fixated on things I didnít think was important when I viewed the piece in whole, but listening to the comments I realized the CD who was use to still photography, was looking at each cut frame by frame, like it was a still shoot.

In the recut, I selected sections that could be viewed that way, frame by frame and it was approved in an hour.

James, nice to read your interesting posts, as always.

Agree on Resolve and editorial.

Nice to hear that you got inspiring projects. Take care.

Ps: I need to put my hand on the Canon you mentionned.
« Last Edit: December 09, 2017, 06:23:25 PM by fredjeang2 »
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