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Author Topic: Tilt/Shift lens choice for Panorama  (Read 17290 times)

stever

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Tilt/Shift lens choice for Panorama
« Reply #20 on: August 06, 2006, 01:07:18 pm »

the real benefit of the L bracket is the ease of turning the camera vertical while keeping the lens centered over the ball head (the late L-plates have centerline marked)

this is particularly useful for the 20d to get high resolution pans (even if you only want conventional format for a landscape)

i've had very good luck with Panorama Maker - the latest version (which i don't have) even supports RAW which would at least be useful for a quick look even if you decide to do the conversion in Photoshop

it seems like the pan software would like uncompressed images better, but i haven't tried to prove it
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Ray

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Tilt/Shift lens choice for Panorama
« Reply #21 on: August 07, 2006, 07:38:30 am »

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the real benefit of the L bracket is the ease of turning the camera vertical while keeping the lens centered over the ball head (the late L-plates have centerline marked)

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Yes. That seems to be the case. I have a very light Manfrotto tripod with a ballhead, which I usually carry with me when weight is an issue. Getting the camera to stay in position, in vertical orientation, is difficult. The L bracket with B2-Pro clamp should be ideal. Trouble is, shortly after getting this from RRS, I bought a 5D and more or less forgot about this L plate. It doesn't fit the 5D, of course.

I've just checked the RRS website to order a B5D-L, but it appears they are out of stock. I hope they come in stock soon because I'm leaving on a photographic trip in a month or so.
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jani

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Tilt/Shift lens choice for Panorama
« Reply #22 on: August 14, 2006, 06:37:37 pm »

A bit off-topic, but ...

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cyclone proofing in the beams, and the power extension cord plugs ;-)
I can understand the power extension cord plugs (and the airconditioner), but not what's so special about the beams.

Granted, I come from a country where beams would often be built to withstand storms and such, so I might be a bit blind as to what would make that beam different apart from seeming a bit small.
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Jan

picnic

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Tilt/Shift lens choice for Panorama
« Reply #23 on: August 14, 2006, 07:38:49 pm »

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why do people use TS lenses for panoramas? I don't understand how TS lenses work. links to relevant articles would be appreciated.
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This one may be helpful in visualizing how they work.
[a href=\"http://www.fredmiranda.com/TS-E90/#Panoramas]http://www.fredmiranda.com/TS-E90/#Panoramas[/url]
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Ray

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Tilt/Shift lens choice for Panorama
« Reply #24 on: August 14, 2006, 07:43:05 pm »

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A bit off-topic, but ...
I can understand the power extension cord plugs (and the airconditioner), but not what's so special about the beams.

[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=73358\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Probably merely corroborative and circumstantial evidence not conclusive by itself.  
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Ray

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Tilt/Shift lens choice for Panorama
« Reply #25 on: August 14, 2006, 08:59:49 pm »

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Granted, I come from a country where beams would often be built to withstand storms and such, so I might be a bit blind as to what would make that beam different apart from seeming a bit small.
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I missed that slight imputation of an insult, Jani   . Yes, the beams are small because I had to lift them (or chose to lift them) myself. But they consist of the strongest, hardest, toughest, most durable, most termite resistant timber that exists; Australian Iron Bark. The beams are also about double the height you see. The rest is taken up with roof insulation. From memory they are 2"x10" and span 5 metres. (You see, I'm the sort of guy who's half metric and half imperial   ).
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jani

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Tilt/Shift lens choice for Panorama
« Reply #26 on: August 14, 2006, 10:10:31 pm »

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I missed that slight imputation of an insult, Jani   .
It wasn't intended as such, so it was good that you missed it.  

It was more meant as an observation that just because it might be a solid beam, it wouldn't make it unique to Australia; there are quite a few other places in the world where it would be sensible to build for storms and reasonable to expect solid constructions.

While the storms and hurricanes on the north-western coast of Norway can be pretty harsh, they're not quite up to the ferocity of babies like Katrina.

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Yes, the beams are small because I had to lift them (or chose to lift them) myself.
Egads!

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But they consist of the strongest, hardest, toughest, most durable, most termite resistant timber that exists;
Termite resistence is something you wouldn't need here.  

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Australian Iron Bark.
Is it also very warp resistant? If so, it would be a cool thing to import to this country. Maybe I can convince someone to construct pool tables from it, too. Not to forget hardcases for airline transportation.

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The beams are also about double the height you see. The rest is taken up with roof insulation. From memory they are 2"x10" and span 5 metres. (You see, I'm the sort of guy who's half metric and half imperial   ).
Ah. If I'm not mistaken, a typical beam in a Norwegian flat-roof house that's not on the exposed west coast would probably be around 4"x10" at that length, if made from glued composite -- "glulam" IIRC -- of fir or spruce (which is about the strongest we get over here, as well as the most predictable material if a fire breaks out). From a handbook in glulam, such a beam would take ca. 35 kN or a momentum of 25 kNm. Whatever that means.
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Jan

Ray

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Tilt/Shift lens choice for Panorama
« Reply #27 on: August 15, 2006, 12:00:25 am »

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Is it also very warp resistant? If so, it would be a cool thing to import to this country. Maybe I can convince someone to construct pool tables from it, too. Not to forget hardcases for airline transportation.


Jani,
It's probably everything resistant. It's so hard you can't drive a nail into it without drilling a hole first with a bit designed for metal. When you cut it with your circular saw, the blade gets blunt very rapidly. The timber used to be used for railway sleepers (before the invention of concrete sleepers) and is still used for fence posts straight into the ground, because it never rots.

I mentioned the beams were 10x2" spanning 5 metres. On reflection, they were actually 8"x2" spanning 5.6 metres, yet still strong enough to support a metal roof plus ceiling and meet the cyclone regulations.
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