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Author Topic: Abstraction in landscape photography  (Read 914661 times)

Eric Myrvaagnes

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Abstraction in landscape photography
« Reply #80 on: July 01, 2006, 10:43:31 am »

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So let's get this straight, Jule. You were standing in this beautiful field of tall grass, admiring the lovely pine trees, Australia's attempt to reduce green house gasses and provide a resource for future timber needs, and suddenly you were afflicted with blurry vision and a feeling of being invaded by aliens descending in miniature flying saucers. Right?  

Sorry! I couldn't resist. 
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I know the feeling. If I take off my glasses to clean them, or if I brought the wrong glasses with me, I get that effect.  Now I'll know to call it "abstraction".    

Eric
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jule

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Abstraction in landscape photography
« Reply #81 on: July 01, 2006, 06:17:06 pm »

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So let's get this straight, Jule. You were standing in this beautiful field of tall grass, admiring the lovely pine trees, Australia's attempt to reduce green house gasses and provide a resource for future timber needs, and suddenly you were afflicted with blurry vision and a feeling of being invaded by aliens descending in miniature flying saucers. Right?  

Sorry! I couldn't resist. 
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lol Ray   Good to see that I provided a few laughs!
Julie
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jule

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Abstraction in landscape photography
« Reply #82 on: July 01, 2006, 06:29:13 pm »

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I know the feeling. If I take off my glasses to clean them, or if I brought the wrong glasses with me, I get that effect.  Now I'll know to call it "abstraction".   

Eric
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Hey Eric ...now you know how to be an 'abstract artist'  
Julie
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jule

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Abstraction in landscape photography
« Reply #83 on: November 25, 2006, 03:11:20 pm »

For those who followed this thread on abstraction, the time has come for my own exhibition.   I invite all who are interested to view my work - in Sydney from 29th November - 23rd December. Details  http://www.esajaskegallery.com/Exhibitions.html

julie
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Eric Myrvaagnes

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Abstraction in landscape photography
« Reply #84 on: November 25, 2006, 09:26:55 pm »

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For those who followed this thread on abstraction, the time has come for my own exhibition.   I invite all who are interested to view my work - in Sydney from 29th November - 23rd December. Details  http://www.esajaskegallery.com/Exhibitions.html

julie
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The samples on the website look really nice. I wish I could see the real show, but it's a bit too long a walk from the northeastern U.S.

Congratulations, Julie!

-Eric
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GerardK

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Abstraction in landscape photography
« Reply #85 on: November 26, 2006, 06:59:02 am »

Sorry to arrive so late to smell the coffee in this thread; I just spent some time reading from the beginning. I've been experimenting with motion blur for about a year now, and I'm still not sure whether or not I'm on to something. Or, rather, I should say we - I hadn't realised so many other photographers were experimenting along similar lines.

Please have a look at my website at http://www.kingma.nu/ and click on the galleries 'Memories' and 'Motion'. There are also brief 'artist's statements' (click "About this series...").

In these experiments, I usually take a lot of pictures, easily a hundred within an hour or so, while moving the camera. I shoot RAW and select the images that work for me in Adobe Bridge; I then adjust brightness, contrast and saturation in RAW conversion, but not much else. No Photoshop filters.

What I've learned sofar is:
- the images that work best, fairly rigorously adhere to basic principles of composition in the way the various image elements interact in the way they fill the frame;
- they work well in series of images that complement each other, more so than 'traditional' (in-focus) images
- although the object is not to focus on details, it's my experience as well that the images work best when printed large (24"x36"), with a myriad of subtle color transitions to enjoy;
- they are fiendishly difficult to print well because of the very fine and gentle gradations that are easily ruined by dithering patterns or posterization and whatnot.

So please tell me what you think!

Gerard Kingma
www.kingma.nu

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« Last Edit: November 26, 2006, 07:06:48 am by GerardK »
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Eric Myrvaagnes

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Abstraction in landscape photography
« Reply #86 on: November 26, 2006, 10:41:25 am »

Gerard,

Wow! The six you posted are stunning. I find them totally convincing, and beautiful (and my own predisposition is toward the f64 school.)

I'll check your website as soon as I have time (got to go out right now) and offer comments.

Eric
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Jonathan Wienke

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Abstraction in landscape photography
« Reply #87 on: November 26, 2006, 04:08:27 pm »

Just for fun, I posted an "abstract" image of my own here. I'm curious to see what y'all think of it...
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jmdr

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Abstraction in landscape photography
« Reply #88 on: November 26, 2006, 08:47:53 pm »

Gerard, wow- beautiful images!  I especially like the 3rd and 4th images you've attached to your post (and the 1st is a close runner-up).

I also had the pleasure to have a quick look at your website, and was inspired by the different variations of motion blur that you've created.  I also really appreciated your description of the artistic choices you make to obscure or enhance detail in your images.

I was wondering how you "decide" when to use the radial movement (e.g. "Memory nr. 1"), and when to use the linear movement (e.g. "Autumn forest 1-3")?

(and I had a big smile on my face when I saw "Memory nr. 12"!)

Jonathan
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GerardK

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Abstraction in landscape photography
« Reply #89 on: November 27, 2006, 03:47:07 am »

Eric, Jonathan,

Thanks for your kind and enthusiastic feedback! It's a big help to me that some of this stuff connects with anyone. Jonathan, I hadn't really thought about using various techniques of blurring, but you're right. Your favorite picture, Memory 12 of the girl turning cartwheels, was made without moving the camera, but only thrown out of focus, what you experimented with (by the way, it's darned difficult to get a digicam out of focus, I set it to super macro mode.) I feel motion adds energy, which works well with pictures of running dogs and children. If you use only out-of-focus without motion it's somehow more restful or tranquil, and that seems to work well with some of your images as well.

As I indicated, I take a lot (a LOT) of pictures in a short time with various techniques without thinking about it too much, I just try to get a feel for my surroundings and then point the camera at it, and see what happened afterwards on the computer. I see all these thumbnails appear in Bridge and my eyes wander around and sort of come to rest on the ones that work. As to your question when to use radial motion blur and linear motion blur - sometimes it seems to work best when the movement follows the basic pattern of the subject. Again, I don't decide beforehand, but pick out the ones that work best afterward. Basically, the ones I liked from rows of trees are linear movement in the same direction, moving from the tree roots to the leaves. This somehow emphasizes the repeating patterns of trees. If you do that kind of subject with radial blur, it just becomes messy.

Conversely, radial blur seems to work well with subjects that are, well, radial, such as an entire tree crown with autumn leaves etc.

Eric, it may surprise you that I'm also a f64 type of guy - to me it's different sides of the same medal. I also use a 4x5 large format camera, with which I take pictures in extreme detail. In a way, that's the same kind of abstraction, interpreted the other way around. I wrote a bit about that on my website, the "About..." text with the Motion images and the Large format images.


Gerard Kingma
www.kingma.nu
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Eric Myrvaagnes

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Abstraction in landscape photography
« Reply #90 on: November 27, 2006, 08:51:11 pm »

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Eric, it may surprise you that I'm also a f64 type of guy - to me it's different sides of the same medal. I also use a 4x5 large format camera, with which I take pictures in extreme detail. In a way, that's the same kind of abstraction, interpreted the other way around. I wrote a bit about that on my website, the "About..." text with the Motion images and the Large format images.
Gerard Kingma
www.kingma.nu
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Gerard,

I've now had a chance to take an initial look at your website, and I immediately bookmarked it. I want to go back and savor it a little at a time. So far I have looked at (and thoroughly enjoyed) Motion, Memories, Austria, and Norway.

I am also very pleased with the clean, uncluttered look of your website and the ease of navigation. And I find your commentaries very informative.

Beautiful work. Thanks for sharing it.

Eric
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GerardK

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« Reply #91 on: November 28, 2006, 03:54:04 am »

Eric,

You know, that really makes my day. Thanks a million. The site has developed over a number of years, but I've always had visitors in mind that had to rely on crappy phone line connections in the desert and still wanted to visit the website (if they're still out there, get them a beer will you?) So no fancy flash, no java, no nothing, just the good stuff. A warm welcome to you, and enjoy the ride. Feel free to contact me with any questions!



Gerard Kingma

www.kingma.nu
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BernardLanguillier

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Abstraction in landscape photography
« Reply #92 on: November 29, 2006, 12:30:16 am »

Gerard,

Thanks for posting these, I am especially fond of the 3rd and last ones!

Cheers,
Bernard

Dan Gaye

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Abstraction in landscape photography
« Reply #93 on: December 02, 2006, 02:38:09 am »

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I would love to hear any comments on my work, specifically or in general, but would also like to talk about your thoughts on this matter, hear about other photographers that used abstraction in their work, etc.

You can also post your comments/thoughts on my own (recently installed) discussion board at www.borealisimages.ca/disussionboard/

Thanks,

Jonathan

Hi Jonathan,

I have enjoyed reading this thread. Here are a few of my thoughts on the subject. Out of focus, motion blur, selective focus... I have used all of these techniques in my work with some success. I think techniques are like tools they are not the basis for what makes it work. I think that you will find if you have a point of interest regardless of the focus the photo will communicate to the viewer better. I shoot abstracts for fun but have a few rules for myself. Although I shoot with a digital camera, I do not use photoshop to alter the image with retouching or filters. I do adjust color, contrast and crop my images but these techniques can be done traditionally during printing. For me, the challenge was to create art with my camera not the computer. I own several original abstract paintings from different artists and thought it would be fun to create something that I could hang on my wall that I would enjoy looking at. Other restrictions I put on myself include shooting handheld, available light, and I do not repeat the subject matter. The latter keeps each image more unique but makes finding your subject much harder. I had these images giclée printed on a very heavy 500 gsm somerset paper and later spot-glossed coated. The size of each print is close to 20"x28". I have shown some of my photos at a few local art shows. It is interesting to see how people react to them but I haven't sold any yet. I didn't create them to sell so I don't really care. Maybe when I am retired I will have more time to spend on my artwork. Meanwhile I will add images to my collection.

Dan

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« Last Edit: December 02, 2006, 02:47:12 am by Dan Gaye »
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James Godman

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« Reply #94 on: December 08, 2006, 11:51:01 am »

Hey Dan-

I especially like your spill and lights images.  Thanks for sharing.
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peter-natureindetail

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Abstraction in landscape photography
« Reply #95 on: January 15, 2007, 07:20:15 am »

Hello fellow photographers,
Just logged in as new member, to share and be challenged! I am a Dutch photographer and have "focussed" on the subject of (mostly) abstract natural photos. I published www.natureindetail.nl last week, would welcome you to take a look and comments to learn more.
To give an idea I added these already to this post:
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BernardLanguillier

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Abstraction in landscape photography
« Reply #96 on: January 16, 2007, 03:16:33 am »

One from me on this:



Cheers,
Bernard

dobson

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« Reply #97 on: January 21, 2007, 02:36:17 pm »

My 50mm 1.8 fell apart so I experimented with the obviously flawed optics. By reversing the front elements you can create some interesting effects; especially wide open. This is a view of the forest behind my house with the broken 50.

[attachment=1588:attachment]

Phillip
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Eric Myrvaagnes

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Abstraction in landscape photography
« Reply #98 on: January 21, 2007, 03:59:17 pm »

Quote
My 50mm 1.8 fell apart so I experimented with the obviously flawed optics. By reversing the front elements you can create some interesting effects; especially wide open. This is a view of the forest behind my house with the broken 50.

[attachment=1588:attachment]

Phillip
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Quite a neat abstract!
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jule

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Abstraction in landscape photography
« Reply #99 on: January 21, 2007, 06:01:18 pm »

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Hello fellow photographers,
Just logged in as new member, to share and be challenged! I am a Dutch photographer and have "focussed" on the subject of (mostly) abstract natural photos. I published www.natureindetail.nl last week, would welcome you to take a look and comments to learn more.
To give an idea I added these already to this post:
[attachment=1552:attachment]
[attachment=1553:attachment]
[attachment=1554:attachment]
[attachment=1555:attachment]
[attachment=1556:attachment]
[attachment=1557:attachment]
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=95814\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Thank you for sharing your images. I stand to be corrected, but I'm not certain that your images can be classified as abstract. They are too easily identifiable, and look like crops from larger images.

Julie
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