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Author Topic: New Camera Orbiting Jupiter  (Read 13743 times)

Telecaster

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Re: New Camera Orbiting Jupiter
« Reply #20 on: November 03, 2017, 09:42:43 PM »

Juno completed its 8th observing close encounter with Jupiter on October 24. It’s taking time to get the flyby data, including JunoCam pics, from the spacecraft ‘cuz for awhile the Sun was in the way.  :)  Should be a pic or two to post pretty soon.

https://www.nasa.gov/feature/jpl/juno-aces-eighth-science-pass-of-jupiter-names-new-project-manager

-Dave-
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Telecaster

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Re: New Camera Orbiting Jupiter
« Reply #21 on: November 09, 2017, 08:09:22 PM »

Here’s a nifty pic from the October 24th flyby. It’s big so I’ve provided a direct link rather than insert it.

Some info about the pic: https://www.missionjuno.swri.edu/news/jupiters-stunning-southern-hemisphere

-Dave-
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Telecaster

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Re: New Camera Orbiting Jupiter
« Reply #22 on: December 12, 2017, 02:45:42 PM »

NASA has released a summary of data Juno has collected so far on Jupiter's Great Red Spot.

https://solarsystem.nasa.gov/news/2017/12/11

The *GRS extends down more than 300km (200 miles) into the planet's atmosphere!

Also, you'll find a bunch of cool Jupiter images here: https://solarsystem.nasa.gov/news/2017/12/04/10-things-dec-4-awe-inspiring-jupiter-images-not-to-be-missed

-Dave-

*Originally typed GRB and didn't catch the mistake 'til just now. GRB stands for Gamma Ray Burst, a somewhat more energetic thing than the Great Red Spot.  :D
« Last Edit: December 12, 2017, 11:34:25 PM by Telecaster »
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BradSmith

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Re: New Camera Orbiting Jupiter
« Reply #23 on: December 12, 2017, 03:05:05 PM »

Dave,
thanks for keeping track of NASA imaging updates and posting them here.  I love seeing them.
Brad
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Telecaster

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Re: New Camera Orbiting Jupiter
« Reply #24 on: December 12, 2017, 04:12:31 PM »

You're welcome, Brad.

There are a bunch of very cool thermal images of both Jupiter and its geologically active moon Io being shown and discussed today at the fall meeting of the American Geophysical Union. The images come from Juno's Jovian Infrared Auroral Mapper (JIRAM). Hopefully they'll get publicly released soon so I can link to 'em here.

-Dave-
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Telecaster

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Re: New Camera Orbiting Jupiter
« Reply #25 on: December 17, 2017, 04:30:05 PM »

Seàn Doran, one of the folks most active in processing JunoCam images, has posted the attached three today via Twitter. Thought I'd just grab 'em and repost here as they're "not bad."

-Dave-
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Peter McLennan

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Re: New Camera Orbiting Jupiter
« Reply #26 on: December 17, 2017, 07:28:53 PM »

Stupefying, as usual. Thanks!
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Telecaster

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Re: New Camera Orbiting Jupiter
« Reply #27 on: December 17, 2017, 11:19:41 PM »

BTW, Juno made its latest flyby yesterday evening (US time). Dunno if JunoCam was even active for this one as it was an "orientation pass," used for precisely measuring the spacecraft's position & trajectory relative to Jupiter with (I surmise) the aim of tweaking its orbit if necessary or desired.

-Dave-
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Telecaster

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Re: New Camera Orbiting Jupiter
« Reply #28 on: December 19, 2017, 05:47:58 PM »

JunoCam was in fact operating during the latest flyby ("Perijove" #10). Another of the active JunoCam data processors, Kevin Gill, has tweeted these three just-transmitted images. I like that they're less worked than typical, more like what we'd see if we were there ourselves.

-Dave-
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Peter McLennan

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Re: New Camera Orbiting Jupiter
« Reply #29 on: December 19, 2017, 06:19:52 PM »

Dave what's the highest pixel dimension version of these images that's publicly available? I'd like to try a big print of one of these.  A gallery wrap canvas.
Thanks!
Peter
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Telecaster

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Re: New Camera Orbiting Jupiter
« Reply #30 on: December 19, 2017, 06:34:00 PM »

Peter, have a look here: https://www.missionjuno.swri.edu/junocam/processing

JunoCam images are put together from 1600x155 pixel strips and can be a variety of different composited sizes.

-Dave-
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Peter McLennan

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Re: New Camera Orbiting Jupiter
« Reply #31 on: December 20, 2017, 07:53:58 AM »

Thanks, Dave. Quite the process that camera goes through.
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Telecaster

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Re: New Camera Orbiting Jupiter
« Reply #32 on: December 20, 2017, 04:14:22 PM »

One more from the latest flyby, processed by Gerald Eichstädt. These folks have refined and automated their workflows very nicely.

-Dave-
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MattBurt

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Re: New Camera Orbiting Jupiter
« Reply #33 on: December 20, 2017, 05:48:13 PM »

Awesome stuff (in the true sense of the word). Thanks for sharing!
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-MattB

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Re: New Camera Orbiting Jupiter
« Reply #34 on: December 28, 2017, 04:02:50 PM »

Here's another pic from the latest flyby, processsed by Gerald Eichstädt. This is looking toward Jupiter's south pole (in shadow) from below.

-Dave-
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Telecaster

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Re: New Camera Orbiting Jupiter
« Reply #35 on: January 07, 2018, 03:55:13 PM »

This one's OT but it's so pretty I had to post it here. It's a recent UV-spectrum photo of Venus taken by the Japanese Akatsuki orbiter. The story of how Akatsuki, after being pretty much written off as a failed mission, was brought back into play (and is now doing fruitful science) is fascinating all by itself. Akatsuki's orbit is highly elliptical, not unlike Juno's.

Pic processed into "RGB" by Damia Bouic from 283–365nm source data.

Edit #1: I've found out from Kevin Gill, one of the prominent JunoCam image processors, that this photo also uses infrared data captured by Akatsuki.

Edit #2: I've added a second pic, also processed by Damia Bouic. Look at the cloud detail. Lovely!

-Dave-
« Last Edit: January 15, 2018, 12:17:39 AM by Telecaster »
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Telecaster

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Re: New Camera Orbiting Jupiter
« Reply #36 on: January 09, 2018, 04:03:54 PM »

Shown today at the current American Astronomical Society meeting: this thermal infrared Juno image of Jupiter's south (I think) pole. Taken off a large screen projection. Yow, look at all those storms!

-Dave-
« Last Edit: January 09, 2018, 04:07:13 PM by Telecaster »
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Telecaster

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Re: New Camera Orbiting Jupiter
« Reply #37 on: January 09, 2018, 04:14:06 PM »

And here's the north pole. These are both JIRAM (Jovian InfraRed Auroral Mapper) images.

-Dave-
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Telecaster

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Re: New Camera Orbiting Jupiter
« Reply #38 on: January 17, 2018, 03:10:55 PM »

More OT re. Venus images from JAXA's Akatsuki orbiter: an explanatory piece at the Planetary Society website by Damia Bouic, the person responsible for reviving interest in the images.

http://www.planetary.org/blogs/guest-blogs/2018/0116-a-new-look-at-venus-with-akatsuki.html

-Dave-
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Telecaster

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Re: New Camera Orbiting Jupiter
« Reply #39 on: February 07, 2018, 09:42:31 PM »

Perijove (flyby) #11 for the Juno orbiter happened earlier today. Pics to follow.

-Dave-
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