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Author Topic: Architecture/shift with the E-M1 & 17mm TSE  (Read 3852 times)

TonyVentourisPhotography

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Architecture/shift with the E-M1 & 17mm TSE
« on: March 24, 2016, 11:11:26 am »

So I finally got around to testing this combination.  I have generally used a tech cam for all my architectural work. I have been searching for a good solution to be able to do this kind of work with my Olympus gear.  I sold off all my shift lenses from Canon when I dove into medium format.  The smearing in the corners of extreme shifts was too much.  Tech cams with the right lenses and sensors have been awesome even with huge shift. (key being what lenses and shifted in which way...)

Anyways I have a lot of projects that are too fast paced for tech cams or the clients or sometimes if I am shooting for me, I don't want to haul the MF and laptop, and cables, and everything that goes with that. 

I gave Canon's 17mm TSe on a metabones adapter a try.  That gives me the traditional 24mm view and full tilt and shift. 

I have to say, it was actually rather impressive.  It works better on m43 with the adapter than it does on the canon.  The lens and adapter are a bit heavier than the 40-150 Pro...but the weight is a lot further forward.  It works though. 

If you feel like reading more and seeing a bunch of samples I posted on my blog.  https://unlockingolympus.com/2016/03/architecture-with-a-canon-17mm-ts-e-on-an-olympus-e-m1/

If you dont like reading, you can just examine shots here.  I have left them in full size, but level 10 jpg.  Click the photo, then choose sizing from the bottom right.
http://www.tonyventourisphoto.com/Unlocking-Olympus/Posts/17mm-TSE/n-J29QPL/i-BFRsm32

Corners are surprisingly decent at full shift depending which way you work it. 

I need to get my hands on a Pen-F and try hi-res mode with this set up to compare to my tech cam.  Very interesting...

Any one else tried this?
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Tony
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Slobodan Blagojevic

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Re: Architecture/shift with the E-M1 & 17mm TSE
« Reply #1 on: March 24, 2016, 11:54:13 am »

Thank you, Tony.

Question: what f/stop would you use to prevent or mitigate corner softening when fully shifted?
« Last Edit: March 24, 2016, 01:40:14 pm by Slobodan Blagojevic »
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BobDavid

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Re: Architecture/shift with the E-M1 & 17mm TSE
« Reply #2 on: March 27, 2016, 01:43:38 am »

I've been using a Cambo Actus with a 24mm Actar lens. The Actar takes standard 82mm filters.  It's an elegant solution. And it is not at all fiddly. Using the back standard for rise/fall and shift (no parallax distortion with stitching) and the front for swings and tilts offers an enormous amount of focus control. And of course with the E-M5 II there's the high-resolution option. ... The sweet spot for the Actar is f/8. And with the Actus, it's simple to change orientation by simply pressing a lever and rotating the camera. Rise/fall and shifts work fine at +/- 12 mm. With longer lenses, the range is greater.

The Actus is an agnostic platform. A lot of photographers like using it with Sony A7x cameras. It's a great system for shooting mirrorless. I'll eventually rent a Pentax K-1. I am curious to see how it will perform with the Actus.

I use a geared head (a modest Manfrotto); it makes leveling a piece of cake. The level function on the Oly E-M5/1 is okay--not 100% accurate.
« Last Edit: March 27, 2016, 02:16:11 am by BobDavid »
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donbga

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Re: Architecture/shift with the E-M1 & 17mm TSE
« Reply #3 on: March 27, 2016, 09:08:48 am »

The level function on the Oly E-M5/1 is okay--not 100% accurate.

The level function on the EM-1 can be recalibrated, FWIW.

Don Bryant
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BobDavid

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Re: Architecture/shift with the E-M1 & 17mm TSE
« Reply #4 on: March 27, 2016, 10:26:56 am »

The level function on the EM-1 can be recalibrated, FWIW.

Don Bryant

When properly calibrated, the level is accurate to about a half a degree at best. It's noticeable, especially if the horizon is in the photo. There is some slop in the level function. This is especially noticeable when using a geared head. It's especially noticeable with ultra wide as well as long lenses.
« Last Edit: March 27, 2016, 10:39:36 am by BobDavid »
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Guillermo Luijk

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Re: Architecture/shift with the E-M1 & 17mm TSE
« Reply #5 on: March 27, 2016, 10:51:53 am »

What I find specially interesting from your setup, if I am not wrong, is that the 12mm shift applied to the 17mm TS on the M4/3 sensor+Metabones, corresponds to a higher than 12mm shift on a 24mm TS-E on a FF body, is that correct? How many mm would it be equivalent to? I feel a bit lost in the 2x crop factor plus Metabones focal conversion.

Another point to remark is that you are composing panoramic images without shifting over the lens but over the camera. How do you avoid parallax artifacts with so close subjects?.

Regards

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marc aurel

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Re: Architecture/shift with the E-M1 & 17mm TSE
« Reply #6 on: March 27, 2016, 12:25:34 pm »

When you use a 17mm lens with a 2x crop camera like the Olympus - wouldn't that result in 34mm equivalent on full frame (rather than 24mm)?
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Bart_van_der_Wolf

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Re: Architecture/shift with the E-M1 & 17mm TSE
« Reply #7 on: March 27, 2016, 12:56:12 pm »

When you use a 17mm lens with a 2x crop camera like the Olympus - wouldn't that result in 34mm equivalent on full frame (rather than 24mm)?

Hi Marc,

That's correct, but he is also using a 0.7x Speedbooster converter.

Cheers,
Bart
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marc aurel

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Re: Architecture/shift with the E-M1 & 17mm TSE
« Reply #8 on: March 27, 2016, 01:12:50 pm »

Hi Marc,

That's correct, but he is also using a 0.7x Speedbooster converter.

Cheers,
Bart

Thanks. I didn't realize that.
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TonyVentourisPhotography

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Re: Architecture/shift with the E-M1 & 17mm TSE
« Reply #9 on: March 28, 2016, 05:55:42 pm »

I am using F/7.1 most of the time.  That is the sweetspot for m43 before diffraction sets it.  I go to 11 if i NEED to.  Even 16.  However, If I do, I usually take a second shot at F/7.1 to make sure I get areas of detail cleaner for compositing.  (so like shots with long exposure water, or escalators, etc... I dont care if they are diffraction hit at F16 for example...but I do want whatever is still next to them sharp)

Yup, the converter brings me back to 24mm focal length equivalent.  (i wish we all just spoke in degrees!  72-degree horizonal view!)

In terms of mm shift... yes it is still shifting 12mm.  However, the image circle cast is still whatever the 17 tse casts.  I will not hit the same edge that a full frame camera hits with the 17mm mounted.  I am going to be the sensor size difference away from that point still.  (plus taking into consideration the converter)  Same thing being said, for those that mount a medium format sensor to the actus can still use the 17mm...but their amount of shift will be quite cut I assume as the corner gets hit sooner due to the sensor being larger in the same image circle. 

Parallax is not a HUGE issue unless you are really close.  The larger issue is moving the camera a minute amount when turning the knobs!  I still prefer a rear shift option.  The actus seems like would be the better way to go but I have yet to test it.  In reality, the small amount of perspective shift due to shift lens panorama is tiny until you get withina foot or two of you subject.  I find 24mm is rarely the focal length I use to get that close when making panoramas. 

I also have a panoramic tripod setup.  So I usually just shift to my desired position, and then use the calibrated pano head to get my shots.  Gets me best of both worlds.  Most software though, lightroom is decent and PTGUI is phenomenal, covers up small parallax issues pretty well.  Again, this all depends on how close, and how precise/extreme you need for your results and goal.  Real world use shows its less of an issue in most scenarios.

E-M1 level...its close.  Not perfect.  Close enough for rough leveling.  I still use the bubbles on my tripod head.  I usually put the grid lines on my screen.  Ide rather make sure I am level vertically.  I can always rotate a crooked horizon, but I don't want to keystone correct if I don't have to. 
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Tony
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mediumcool

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Re: Architecture/shift with the E-M1 & 17mm TSE
« Reply #10 on: April 18, 2016, 08:47:43 am »

Lots of 404s in the JPEG links.
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TonyVentourisPhotography

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Re: Architecture/shift with the E-M1 & 17mm TSE
« Reply #11 on: April 19, 2016, 01:11:03 pm »

FIXED! 

Sorry!  I inadvertently did something dumb on my gallery back end and didn't realize the change went live!  Thank you so much for catching that!  Everything works again!
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