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Author Topic: What is total read time of sensor in Fuji electronic shutter mode?  (Read 2796 times)

AFairley

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Just curious.
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David Sutton

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Re: What is total read time of sensor in Fuji electronic shutter mode?
« Reply #1 on: February 10, 2016, 03:48:41 am »

From memory, about 1/30th second.
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David Sutton

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Re: What is total read time of sensor in Fuji electronic shutter mode?
« Reply #3 on: February 10, 2016, 06:05:18 pm »

1/15th

http://janssico.com/2014/12/x100ts-electronic-shutter-speed-analysis/
Hello Guillermo. Yes, I saw that analysis for the X100T. I'm not convinced it's the same for the XT-1. Are they the same processor and electronics? The XT-1 feels about the equivalent of 1/30th sec when hand held and I look at the image sharpness (IOS off).
At any rate, it's not for photographing anything faster than a teenager at dawn.
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AFairley

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Re: What is total read time of sensor in Fuji electronic shutter mode?
« Reply #4 on: February 10, 2016, 08:50:59 pm »

Thanks guys, I have been wondering what the electronic shutter would be like for street photography.  I usually shoot at 1/400 with auto ISO to cut down on motion blur.  I guess I'll have to go out and take some pictures to see if people move fast enough the create rolling shutter warping.
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Ken Bennett

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Re: What is total read time of sensor in Fuji electronic shutter mode?
« Reply #5 on: February 11, 2016, 08:28:17 am »

I think it's about 1/20 sec.

I do get some rolling shutter issues when shooting moving subjects or when using a longer lens (camera movement).
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Equipment: a camera and some lenses. https://www.instagram.com/wakeforestphoto/

Guillermo Luijk

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Re: What is total read time of sensor in Fuji electronic shutter mode?
« Reply #6 on: February 11, 2016, 12:24:29 pm »

Hello Guillermo. Yes, I saw that analysis for the X100T. I'm not convinced it's the same for the XT-1. Are they the same processor and electronics? The XT-1 feels about the equivalent of 1/30th sec when hand held and I look at the image sharpness (IOS off).
At any rate, it's not for photographing anything faster than a teenager at dawn.
1/30th is exactly what I estimated for the X-T1, but with so many physical approximations (including the diameter and speed of an arrow), I can only assure the real value should be somewhere around those 1/30th.

http://www.guillermoluijk.com/article/rollingshutter/index.htm

Regards

Enviado desde mi GT-I9195 mediante Tapatalk
« Last Edit: February 11, 2016, 12:28:08 pm by Guillermo Luijk »
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armand

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Re: What is total read time of sensor in Fuji electronic shutter mode?
« Reply #7 on: February 12, 2016, 05:02:13 pm »

1/14,000 - 90mm F2

Can't say I see rolling shutter effect

Guillermo Luijk

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Re: What is total read time of sensor in Fuji electronic shutter mode?
« Reply #8 on: February 17, 2016, 03:31:10 pm »

1/14,000 - 90mm F2

Can't say I see rolling shutter effect

While slight, your image still shows rolling shutter effect. Unless you have performed some rectilinear correction to the final image, in the vertical direction the tiles are perfectly vertical, while in the horizontal direction they have lost their orthogonality because of your hand-held motion (the sensor is read top-bottom, which in your tilted image corresponds to the left-right direction). The kid's rolling shutter is then the sum of camera movement plus its own jump speed:



The truth is that the final image is perfectly correct because both movements (your hand and the kid) were still slow enough not to display agressive distortion.

Regards
« Last Edit: February 17, 2016, 04:03:54 pm by Guillermo Luijk »
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