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Author Topic: Longevity of SD cards  (Read 4829 times)

razrblck

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Re: Longevity of SD cards
« Reply #20 on: February 18, 2016, 11:01:27 am »

Don't worry, the batteries in your camera will stop working much sooner than any other component inside it.
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Rhossydd

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Re: Longevity of SD cards
« Reply #21 on: February 23, 2016, 11:30:30 am »

I just  bought two SanDisk ExtremePro SDHC UHS1 cards which have a little diagram on the back that suggests that their operating range is  -13F to +185F 
This can't possibly be true can it???
Old stock ;-)
The latest ones go from -40C to 85C (-40F to 185F) http://www.theregister.co.uk/2016/02/22/newsflash_sandisks_flash_car_flash_card/
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dwswager

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Re: Longevity of SD cards
« Reply #22 on: February 23, 2016, 01:31:38 pm »

Old stock ;-)
The latest ones go from -40C to 85C (-40F to 185F) http://www.theregister.co.uk/2016/02/22/newsflash_sandisks_flash_car_flash_card/

Those are operating Temps.  Storage temps are -50C to 150C, at least for the industrial ones.

The real killer for most solid-state electronics is shock and micro vibration.
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Wayne Fox

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Re: Longevity of SD cards
« Reply #23 on: February 24, 2016, 01:02:32 am »



Flash media makes for a bad long term storage device. Hard drives are way better for this and more reliable. You can get external drives for cheap and store way more pictures per dollar on them. I archive backups on 2.5" drives labeled, and it's good to store multiple copies of the same backups as well, but flash memory is still not up to the task.
any source for this?  as mentioned, long term digital storage is still a problem waiting for a solution, but form my experience if you let a hard drive sit around long enough, you have a pretty good chance of it not spinning up.  Yes, flash overused can be a problem, but then flash is getting cheap enough to do write once read many type of uses.  I think we're getting pretty close to 3d flash technology which will flip things pretty quickly, moving flash cheaper and more adopted than hard drives - the death knell of conventional spinning platter solutions.
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razrblck

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Re: Longevity of SD cards
« Reply #24 on: February 24, 2016, 02:20:07 am »

Truly the most lasting media I have are some old 5.25" floppies.

I still have original Kaypro II floppies (software + OS), as well as other misc stuff, that has been working since the late '70s. Too bad you'll need 50 of them just for a single RAW file! :P
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dwswager

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Re: Longevity of SD cards
« Reply #25 on: February 24, 2016, 10:04:00 am »

any source for this?  as mentioned, long term digital storage is still a problem waiting for a solution, but form my experience if you let a hard drive sit around long enough, you have a pretty good chance of it not spinning up.  Yes, flash overused can be a problem, but then flash is getting cheap enough to do write once read many type of uses.  I think we're getting pretty close to 3d flash technology which will flip things pretty quickly, moving flash cheaper and more adopted than hard drives - the death knell of conventional spinning platter solutions.

Floppys and Magnetic Tape have the longest rated lives of most digital storage media.  Flash memory is usually good for up 10 years assuming it is not cycled heavily.  Spinning platter disks are usually rated for 3-5 years but that assumes constant use.  The problem with them is the media will last longer, but inactivity can kill the mechanical components almost as easily as wear from spinning and head movements.  You always have to be careful separating the "data storage" life from actual reasonable retrieval.  A hard disk might still have data, but it might cost $1000s to get someone to crack it open and retrieve the data for you.

I know nothing about M-Disc Technology, but have just started investigating.  Waiting to see if it picks up support.  It is similar to DVD/BD in that it is an optical disc, but the claim to fame is that it uses an inorganic layer to store data and it is better sealed than DVD/BD discs.  Some research suggest up 1,000 life with minimal data rot.  Obviously, if accelerated aging tests can be developed and it tests out well, this will be a boon to all of us with tons of data.  However, it is currently limited to 100GB BD Dual Layer BD.  I'm sure those are pricey disc.
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