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Author Topic: Lens for shooting Big trees  (Read 3096 times)

Herbc

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Lens for shooting Big trees
« on: January 28, 2016, 10:29:38 am »

I have a plan to spend a few days in a virgin forest, where the trees approach Redwood size.  My widest lens at the moment is a 16-35 zoom, and I do have a 24mm t/s lens.  Does anyone have any recommendations about very wide, like 10mm or perhaps 12?  I am not a fisheye fan. 8)
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E.J. Peiker

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Re: Lens for shooting Big trees
« Reply #1 on: January 28, 2016, 03:49:03 pm »

You didn't say which mount you need this lens for...
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PeterAit

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Re: Lens for shooting Big trees
« Reply #2 on: January 28, 2016, 04:40:32 pm »

I have a plan to spend a few days in a virgin forest, where the trees approach Redwood size.  My widest lens at the moment is a 16-35 zoom, and I do have a 24mm t/s lens.  Does anyone have any recommendations about very wide, like 10mm or perhaps 12?  I am not a fisheye fan. 8)

I would consider using stitching techniques rather than a really wide lens.
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Peter
"Science does not care what you believe" - unknown

Herbc

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Re: Lens for shooting Big trees
« Reply #3 on: January 29, 2016, 09:35:16 am »

Mount is Sony A7R and A7II.  Looks like the 24t/s will be good.
Thanks for the replies. 8)
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Paul2660

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Re: Lens for shooting Big trees
« Reply #4 on: January 30, 2016, 07:10:26 am »

Mount is Sony A7R and A7II.  Looks like the 24t/s will be good.
Thanks for the replies. 8)

You might want to consider the 17mm also. Especially if you are in a tight grove where you cannot move back very far.  Plus you can use shift to keep the perspective level or close as I assume you will be looking up a little?

Paul C
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Paul Caldwell
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Herbc

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Re: Lens for shooting Big trees
« Reply #5 on: January 30, 2016, 09:07:41 am »

Yep, looking up a lot.  It has been years since I was there, hope to get there before the leaves come out-it is the Joyce Kilmer park in Western NC.  A very long drive from Raleigh, so overnight stay is a must, and they have a lot of snow this time of year, which could be a real problem. 8)
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Jeremy Roussak

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Re: Lens for shooting Big trees
« Reply #6 on: January 30, 2016, 01:40:24 pm »

Yep, looking up a lot.  It has been years since I was there, hope to get there before the leaves come out-it is the Joyce Kilmer park in Western NC.  A very long drive from Raleigh, so overnight stay is a must, and they have a lot of snow this time of year, which could be a real problem. 8)

Or a real opportunity  ;)

Jeremy
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stevenf

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Re: Lens for shooting Big trees
« Reply #7 on: January 30, 2016, 11:40:27 pm »

I use a 180mm lens on a Hoseman 617. I mostly shoot images of trees in the panoramic format. You could stitch to get a similar look. As of late I have been stitching with a Phase One XF with a 80 MP back.

Have a look if you have the time.

Steven

http://www.friedmanphoto.com
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rdonson

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Re: Lens for shooting Big trees
« Reply #8 on: January 31, 2016, 11:13:05 am »

Yep, looking up a lot.  It has been years since I was there, hope to get there before the leaves come out-it is the Joyce Kilmer park in Western NC.  A very long drive from Raleigh, so overnight stay is a must, and they have a lot of snow this time of year, which could be a real problem. 8)

I spent some time in the Joyce Kilmer Memorial Forest in 2015.  It was my first visit.  For those who haven't been there this is one of the rare virgin stands of forest left on the east coast.  There are some truly huge poplars there as well as oak and sycamore with trees up to 400 years old.  Not as old as redwoods but still an amazing site for the east coast which has been deforested several times. 

As a photographer I felt I basically had two options.  Shoot up or shoot the base of the trees.  There are no vistas available that I'm aware of.  I found the gnarly bases of some of the old trees to be fascinating and looked like something out of a Tolkien tale. 

I live outside of Charlotte, NC so the trek is easier for me than from Raleigh.  An added benefit is that my sister-in-law lives in Black Mountain. 
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Regards,
Ron

E.J. Peiker

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Re: Lens for shooting Big trees
« Reply #9 on: January 31, 2016, 12:54:18 pm »

The Canon 17mm T/S would be a good complement to your 24.
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Herbc

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Re: Lens for shooting Big trees
« Reply #10 on: January 31, 2016, 02:00:16 pm »

I think the 17 t/s might be a good idea.  I can't justify both the 17 and the 24, but as I have the 24, that will make the trip the first time.  I have the 16-35 Zony to see about focal lengths. 
Thanks to all for the input.
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