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Author Topic: The Perfect Photogragh  (Read 27974 times)

Alan Klein

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Re: The Perfect Photogragh
« Reply #20 on: August 11, 2015, 11:46:59 am »

I often skip shooting because I think the view isn't "perfect" or I won't be able to get the "perfect" lighting or composition or whatever.  So I wind up skipping what could be a good shot.  What's the expression?  ďDonít let perfect be the enemy of good.Ē

Work for excellence, not perfection. 

Here's a neat article about this subject in another field of endeavor.  I think it applies here as well.
http://www.forbes.com/sites/victorlipman/2014/03/13/dont-let-perfect-be-the-enemy-of-good-tips-to-help-tame-perfectionism/

Isaac

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Re: The Perfect Photogragh
« Reply #21 on: August 11, 2015, 02:05:34 pm »

2) Given the subjective nature of our judgements about photographs, why shouldn't someone regard a particular photograph as perfect ?

There will always be something in an image to nitpick. Just look at the critique section for evidence. ;) ;D

The person who regards a particular photograph as perfect has judged that, for them, there is nothing to nitpick.
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Isaac

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Re: The Perfect Photogragh
« Reply #22 on: August 11, 2015, 02:22:13 pm »

But of what? When/where? How? Using what?

"Would you tell me, please, which way I ought to go from here?"
"That depends a good deal on where you want to get to," said the Cat.
"I donít much care where--" said Alice.
"Then it doesnít matter which way you go," said the Cat.
"--so long as I get SOMEWHERE," Alice added as an explanation.
"Oh, youíre sure to do that," said the Cat, "if you only walk long enough."
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Isaac

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Re: The Perfect Photogragh
« Reply #23 on: August 11, 2015, 02:50:46 pm »

I often skip shooting because I think the view isn't "perfect" or I won't be able to get the "perfect" lighting or composition or whatever.

Do you figure out when there should be "perfect" lighting and where you need to be for your perfect composition -- and then put yourself in that place?
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Otto Phocus

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Re: The Perfect Photogragh
« Reply #24 on: August 11, 2015, 03:08:13 pm »


But of what? When/where? How? Using what?

Perhaps four of those five questions are actually unimportant?

The how is what counts, in my opinion. 

You can find something interesting to photograph anywhere, anytime; you just need to look for it. This can be difficult if you are very familiar with the area (your yard for example).

The "using what" is the least of the concerns.  While we like to focus (pun intended) on the equipment, today's cameras are more than sufficient and are seldom the weakest link in our photography.

But the how... that's the key.  Without the how, I can go to the most interesting place, find the most interesting scene, wait for the most interesting time, with the bestest camera system there is.....and still fail to take the picture I want.

The how is also what will differentiate my photographs from the rest of the photographers with the same (or better) equipment than I have.  Two photographers can try to take the same photograph, but each will have a different "how".... That's what makes it unique to the photographer.

Unfortunately, I can't buy "how", nor can I easily learn it from books/Internets Tubes other than the basics.

The hard part about photography is working on the "how".  It is not a glamorous nor especially exciting part of photography; But I feel it is critical to my photography.

It is easier to write than do.

There is a scene near where I live that I have been trying to photograph well for a while.  It is a nice solitary tree with a swing.  Every time I drove past it, I would think to myself "A good photographer could make a good photograph of this".   Unfortunately, I was alone so there was no good photographer available.  So I tried it myself.

Over a period of months, I must have taken over 50 carefully planned shots of this tree and swing.. and never have been able to capture the essence that I experienced when I see the tree and swing.

Unfortunately, it has been torn down so I can't go back.  Probably a good thing as I was tormenting myself every time I drove past that stupid tree with that silly swing.

I had everything working for me.  I had the what, the where, the when, and I had equipment far superior to my skill.

What I did not have was the "how".  That eluded me.

In my opinion, photography is all about the "how" and less about the other stuff. 

Dammit!   ;D
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Rand47

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Re: The Perfect Photogragh
« Reply #25 on: August 11, 2015, 10:16:30 pm »

This disucssion is interesting, up to a point.  While I do believe that perfection is quantifiable in many realms, art isn't one of them.

I love photography because both the artistic and technical aspects of the pursuit are "un-masterable" in any real sense.  Anything I master, begins to bore me.  Photography will never bore me.  Frustrate me, yes. Thrill me, yes. Bore me, never.

I don't even think of perfection in my pursuit, I think of "interesting and pleasing." When I create something "interesting and/or pleasing," I'm happy.

Rand
« Last Edit: August 13, 2015, 09:56:59 am by Rand47 »
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Rand Scott Adams

stamper

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Re: The Perfect Photogragh
« Reply #26 on: August 12, 2015, 04:29:23 am »


There will always be something in an image to nitpick. Just look at the critique section for evidence. ;) ;D

The person who regards a particular photograph as perfect has judged that, for them, there is nothing to nitpick.

The problem is that you show it to someone who immediately picks a fault - artefacts from poor processing - then it isn't perfect. Isaac the gist of the article was a tutor showing his pupils faults and how to avoid them in order to become "perfect". It is obvious you don't like to show your images to anyone so how do you propose to improve?

Isaac

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Re: The Perfect Photogragh
« Reply #27 on: August 12, 2015, 12:04:25 pm »

The problem is that you show it to someone who immediately picks a fault - artefacts from poor processing - then it isn't perfect.

When you say "poor processing" I wonder that you consider it to be an example of nitpicking.


Isaac the gist of the article was a tutor showing his pupils faults and how to avoid them in order to become "perfect".

Nowhere does the short article mention "a tutor showing his pupils faults".

You seem to have comprehensively misunderstood the article.
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stamper

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Re: The Perfect Photogragh
« Reply #28 on: August 13, 2015, 03:42:43 am »

Isaac I can assure you that I didn't misunderstand the article. You are the one who is at odds with everyone else.....as per usual. ::) :( BTW how do propose to improve???

AreBee

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Re: The Perfect Photogragh
« Reply #29 on: August 13, 2015, 04:36:41 am »

stamper,

Quote
You are the one who is at odds with everyone else...

Not everyone.
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stamper

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Re: The Perfect Photogragh
« Reply #30 on: August 14, 2015, 03:52:17 am »

stamper,

Not everyone.

And what is your opinion or are you just here to snipe?

AreBee

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Re: The Perfect Photogragh
« Reply #31 on: August 14, 2015, 04:06:19 am »

stamper,

Quote
And what is your opinion...

On what would you like my opinion?

Quote
...or are you just here to snipe?

When you wrote "...everyone..." you included me.

You do not have the authority to speak on my behalf.
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stamper

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Re: The Perfect Photogragh
« Reply #32 on: August 14, 2015, 05:12:18 am »

Rob when I wrote the statement.

You are the one who is at odds with everyone else...

You hadn't posted anything in the thread so the statement didn't include you.??? So are you going to contribute anything or are you here just to snipe???

Otto Phocus

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Re: The Perfect Photogragh
« Reply #33 on: August 14, 2015, 07:51:06 am »

I guess it is true.

Some people will argue about anything on the Internets Tubes.  :(
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I shoot with a Camera Obscura with an optical device attached that refracts and transmits light.

AreBee

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Re: The Perfect Photogragh
« Reply #34 on: August 14, 2015, 08:11:06 am »

Otto Phocus,

Quote
Some people will argue about anything on the Internets Tubes.

Some people take enjoyment from it.
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NancyP

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Re: The Perfect Photogragh
« Reply #35 on: August 14, 2015, 03:27:41 pm »

Just think of it (InterToobs arguments) as exercise for the fingers.
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HSway

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Re: The Perfect Photogragh
« Reply #36 on: August 15, 2015, 07:55:05 am »

A counter argument.

http://www.wexphotographic.com/blog/editorial-why-you-shouldnt-get-hung-up-on-perfection?cm_mmc=Facebook-_-Wexfacebook-_-blog-_-editorial-why-you-shouldnt-get-hung-up-on-perfection

Real estate or wedding photographer are some of the examples where people can often view this topic from a more pragmatic angle. And more practical approach can even be included and play its role in a personal concept of perfection. Naturally, the concept can be also rejected as unsuitable.
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HSway

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Re: The Perfect Photogragh
« Reply #37 on: August 15, 2015, 08:54:31 am »

This disucssion is interesting, up to a point.  While I do believe that perfection is quantifiable in many realms, art isn't one of them.

I love photography because both the artistic and technical aspects of the pursuit are "un-masterable" in any real sense.  Anything I master, begins to bore me.  Photography will never bore me.  Frustrate me, yes. Thrill me, yes. Bore me, never.

I don't even think of perfection in my pursuit, I think of "interesting and pleasing." When I create something "interesting and/or pleasing," I'm happy.

Rand

What you say sounds a lot like perfection. Maybe more in a shape of perfect journey.
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HSway

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Re: The Perfect Photogragh
« Reply #38 on: August 15, 2015, 09:01:48 am »

Personally, when I see the right mixture of right components I see the perfection. I see them quite often. And it can be photography or a style that is different from mine own. Because for me this sort of things happens across the styles, genres and types and it mixes with my personal preferences only marginally. I could almost say, itís a different matter. I feel it also opens one's mind to inspiration that way perhaps.
But I donít really think 'perfection' often. Itís more like a natural part of everyday photography and perception of this quality is more spontaneous.
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