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Author Topic: ACR workflow for photography of paintings  (Read 150567 times)

AlterEgo

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Re: ACR workflow for photography of paintings
« Reply #20 on: June 26, 2015, 09:01:51 pm »

paintings with substantial varnish
and you are using polarized light to illuminate the painting and polarizing filter to capture the image, right ?
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George Middleton

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Re: ACR workflow for photography of paintings
« Reply #21 on: June 26, 2015, 09:44:20 pm »

negative.. it's outdoor natural lighting on overcast days. I've just got a UV filter on the camera.. but I do own a circular polarizing filter. I should put that on and use it it sounds like..
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petermfiore

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Re: ACR workflow for photography of paintings
« Reply #22 on: June 26, 2015, 10:22:15 pm »

negative.. it's outdoor natural lighting on overcast days. I've just got a UV filter on the camera.. but I do own a circular polarizing filter. I should put that on and use it it sounds like..

For varnished paintings you need indoor polarized lights and a polarized filter on your flat field lens...it's the way to control the amount of glare on the painting.

Peter

George Middleton

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Re: ACR workflow for photography of paintings
« Reply #23 on: June 27, 2015, 11:24:17 am »

Thanks Peter, I'll check to see if my elinchrom d-lites are polarized or can be..

I have noticed, so far- there are very few specular hi-lites on any textured paint in these outdoor shots; just pleasing hi-lites, but no harsh reflections. In fact, it's pretty tough to tell from the captures that the paintings are varnished.
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AlterEgo

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Re: ACR workflow for photography of paintings
« Reply #24 on: June 27, 2015, 12:32:23 pm »

Thanks Peter, I'll check to see if my elinchrom d-lites are polarized or can be..
you will need to buy filter for your strobes
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George Middleton

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Re: ACR workflow for photography of paintings
« Reply #25 on: June 27, 2015, 01:42:55 pm »

Thanks for that info AE.
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Lundberg02

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Re: ACR workflow for photography of paintings
« Reply #26 on: June 27, 2015, 07:12:14 pm »

"But with certain vivid blues, turquoises, and yellow greens in certain paintings and in their corresponding ProPhoto files- upon conversion to sRGB, those particular colors are squashed pretty good is the problem.. not a pretty translation and RI doesn't make a difference. The colors look accurate to me on screen in the ProPhoto file comparing with the ptg. "
That's quite interesting, since I could not find anything on the web that addresses the subject of the actual gamut of oil, acrylic, and watercolor directly.  I tried every way to ask the search question I could think of and got nothing. Got lots of stuff about paints and painting, but no color space or gamut info specific to art paints. However, on reflection (!) Pointer's Gamut gives us a clue. down the page at   http://dot-color.com/category/color-gamut-standards/  you will see Pointer's Gamut of all reflective colors in nature compared to several device and device independent gamuts. You will see that Pointer is slightly outside argb but well within Pro Photo. Also at TFT Central is 
http://www.tftcentral.co.uk/articles/pointers_gamut.htm    for more detail.  You can check what colors are being squahed using the out of gamut features of Photoshop. It is most likely that RI is doing the squashing.
 None of my paintings look like gamut busters. The only painting I can think of that might is Velasquez "Pope Innocent X" with its incredible reds.
« Last Edit: June 27, 2015, 07:40:52 pm by Lundberg02 »
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George Middleton

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Re: ACR workflow for photography of paintings
« Reply #27 on: June 30, 2015, 04:50:32 pm »

Very interesting articles. Thanks Lundberg.

Yes, the areas of squashed colors correspond visually with out of gamut view.

None of my paintings look like gamut busters. The only painting I can think of that might is Velasquez "Pope Innocent X" with its incredible reds.

For me, the bright reds and yellows are converting very well to sRGB. Not so with bright magentas, deep saturated blues, turquoises, bright blue greens..
i've never actually seen the Velazquez Pope, but I imagine it's quite vivid in real life :)
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