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Author Topic: 10-bit monitor utilizing in Photoshop CC  (Read 4397 times)

Yahor Shumski

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10-bit monitor utilizing in Photoshop CC
« on: May 24, 2015, 10:17:29 am »

Hello,
I just bought awesome NEC PA272W monitor and would like to utilize 10bit/channel function in Photoshop.
At first I struggled to pass gradient test. I checked videocard, drivers, display port connection but gradient bounding disappeared only when Proof Colors were activated in Photoshop. It seems Photoshop version CC activates 30bit output in this regime.

Should I use Proof Colors every time to fully utilize the monitor possibilities?

My files are 16bit AdobeRGB files and monitor was calibrated for AdobeRGB space but for some reason Proof Colors with AdobeRGB profile applied causes color shift in the images. What is the reason for such behavior? Should I use another profile for Proof Colors?

Thanks for your advice.
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digitaldog

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Re: 10-bit monitor utilizing in Photoshop CC
« Reply #1 on: May 24, 2015, 10:35:01 am »

There's no full 10-bit path on Mac OS for one.
All components in the chain have to support high bit; software, OS, video card, display etc.
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Should I use Proof Colors every time to fully utilize the monitor possibilities?
Yes. The high bit stuff is kind of useful, especially when you're not sure if banding is in the data or in the video path but it's not really a huge benefit compared to soft proofing before printing to see what you will hopefully get (within reason) on that print.
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Yahor Shumski

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Re: 10-bit monitor utilizing in Photoshop CC
« Reply #2 on: May 24, 2015, 10:41:59 am »

Andrew,
Thanks for your prompt response.
I am on PC and was able to meet all 10-bit requirements. What still confusing me is Proof Colors options and behavior.

What profile should I use for Proof colors? Mostly I work with 16bit AdobeRGB files converting some of them in sRGB or printer profile later. What is your advise?
« Last Edit: May 24, 2015, 10:43:54 am by Yahor Shumski / euphoriaimg »
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digitaldog

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Re: 10-bit monitor utilizing in Photoshop CC
« Reply #3 on: May 24, 2015, 12:09:07 pm »

What profile should I use for Proof colors?
The output profile for your printing device.
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Yahor Shumski

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Re: 10-bit monitor utilizing in Photoshop CC
« Reply #4 on: October 05, 2015, 04:34:27 am »

The output profile for your printing device.

Okay, I work for clients each with different output device.
Which proof settings should I consider in this case?

Thank you
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digitaldog

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Re: 10-bit monitor utilizing in Photoshop CC
« Reply #5 on: October 05, 2015, 10:59:07 am »

Okay, I work for clients each with different output device.
Which proof settings should I consider in this case?
You pick the profile first, then the Rendering Intent that will be used when that data is converted (you kind of need to know that information).
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Redcrown

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Re: 10-bit monitor utilizing in Photoshop CC
« Reply #6 on: October 05, 2015, 11:36:34 am »

My files are 16bit AdobeRGB files and monitor was calibrated for AdobeRGB space but for some reason Proof Colors with AdobeRGB profile applied causes color shift in the images. What is the reason for such behavior? Should I use another profile for Proof Colors?

When you soft proof an image to itself you get bad color (Adobe98 image soft proofed to Adobe98). That's a bug in Photoshop soft proof and it's been there forever.
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digitaldog

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Re: 10-bit monitor utilizing in Photoshop CC
« Reply #7 on: October 05, 2015, 12:09:33 pm »

When you soft proof an image to itself you get bad color (Adobe98 image soft proofed to Adobe98). That's a bug in Photoshop soft proof and it's been there forever.
When I do what you suggest, I see zero difference. Adobe RGB (1998) image soft proofed to Adobe RGB (1998), toggle preview checkbox on and off, zero visual difference. No bug.
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D Fosse

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Re: 10-bit monitor utilizing in Photoshop CC
« Reply #8 on: October 05, 2015, 01:39:39 pm »

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That's a bug
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No bug

Yes to both. This behavior has been reported for a long time, e.g. in the Adobe PS forum, but it only happens under what appears to be very special circumstances. And nobody knows what they are.

I don't see it, but have heard of it many times.

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Redcrown

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Soft proof to self bug?
« Reply #9 on: October 06, 2015, 12:20:52 am »

Andrew, I'm surprised. When I first discovered the "proof to self" problem years ago I posted on a forum and it was you that told me it was a bug. I've been through 3 Windows configs and several versions of Photoshop since then, and I always see it.

Here it is on my current Win7 Photoshop CC system. Top left = original A98. Top right = original softproofed in A98, Bottom = original A98 softproofed in sRGB.

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digitaldog

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Re: Soft proof to self bug?
« Reply #10 on: October 06, 2015, 04:09:55 pm »

Andrew, I'm surprised. When I first discovered the "proof to self" problem years ago I posted on a forum and it was you that told me it was a bug.
Doesn't ring a bell. There is a bug when you setup a soft proof like this then as to view Out of Gamut Colors! That's not supposed to show any overlay and it can.
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