Luminous Landscape Forum

Equipment & Techniques => Pro Business Discussion => Topic started by: petermarrek on May 09, 2013, 09:26:54 am

Title: future
Post by: petermarrek on May 09, 2013, 09:26:54 am
just curious, as an aging photographer I have a question. most of us are not planning to or thinking of dying but we all will. What are your plans for  the thousands of images we have stored on harddrives and other various media. Will it all just disappear? Most of us have invested thousands of Dollars and a lot of us are trying to sell photos that we own, yet how many of us have a real plan in place. Peter
Title: Re: future
Post by: framah on May 09, 2013, 09:35:44 am
Here's my personal thoughts on this..

First, unless you ( or anyone else) are a famous, in demand, high value photographer, then it pretty much doesn't matter what happens to them after we are dead. No one will care enough to bother with them so, into the trash they go.

If you ARE among that special family of famous shooters, then your  estate will keep selling your stuff for decades.

Either way, I'll be dead and gone so I couldn't care less what happens. I care more that my cats go to a good home and they get to keep their mousey toys!!

Title: Re: future
Post by: Gary Brown on May 09, 2013, 12:30:22 pm
Here's a Ctein essay more or less on that topic: We're All Gonna Die! (http://theonlinephotographer.typepad.com/the_online_photographer/2011/02/were-all-gonna-die.html)

And a couple of earlier threads on this forum:

If you don't print, then what do you leave behind? (http://www.luminous-landscape.com/forum/index.php?topic=67506.0)

End of life (http://www.luminous-landscape.com/forum/index.php?topic=57256.0)
Title: Re: future
Post by: bill t. on May 09, 2013, 12:58:14 pm
I plan to engrave my best images on solid gold DVD's and launch them towards new Earth-like planets as they are discovered.  Otherwise, the small fraction of my framed pieces that survive can be had for a bargain at local thrift stores up through about 2050.  But I'm not counting on flash drives, optical discs, magnetic discs or any other kind of storage media to be readable past another 10 years.  If anybody wants to buy a nice collection of 8" and 5.25" floppies, send a PM.

Or maybe I'll seal a USB drive inside a nitrogen filled, Titanium casket and get these guys (http://longnow.org/clock/) to stash it.  Or maybe just bury several of those caskets under empty lots that are good candidates for future museums.

A few years ago I bought some used CF cards on ebay.  One of them had some rather heart-warming pictures of kids on a picnic.  I contacted the seller and they said, "Oh, that's from our uncle's estate.  Just erase it."  That seemed just too callous, it's still out in the garage somewhere.  I'll leave the dirty work to the next generation.
Title: Re: future
Post by: Ellis Vener on May 09, 2013, 03:47:31 pm
"First, unless you ( or anyone else) are a famous, in demand, high value photographer, then it pretty much doesn't matter what happens to them after we are dead. No one will care enough to bother with them so, into the trash they go."

If that had happened, no one would know who Vivian
Meier, Mike Disfarmer, Eugene Atget, or Diane Arbus were.
Secondly even photographs that do not have great aesthetic or monetary value are worth a great deal to historians. They tell stories about the ways people lived, how people dressed, how they lived, what they valued.
Title: Re: future
Post by: Rob C on May 09, 2013, 05:30:21 pm
The snag, Ellis, is that millions of similar images are already out there gathering dust. Unless my dust is better than your dust, then who'd care about my dust? Too much dust around, and it just gets hoovered away or swept under the world's carpets...

I suspect that our 'masterpieces' have very little value at all. Those people in galleries or 'halls of fame' were already somewhat known during their time alive. It's not true that Arbus only came to prominence post death; I distinctly remember her being well-published prior to that event, her master-stroke of self-publicity.

The value - if any - of photography to the individual (not pro work) is just that: to the individual. Mostly nobody else gives a damn, and sincerely hopes we don't drop it on them when they come calling. I used to have an uncle with a lovely Leica 111G, and all he did was shoot friggin' castles. And project them. I wish I had his Leica today; not sure what I'd shoot, though - problems enough finding subject matter for the hungry animals as it is. Maybe that's a digital fault, though. It's all too cheap and not necessarily cheerful.

They say you don't know what you've got until you lose it; I guess you have to see a parallel there with film, too: it came with a built-in editor.

Rob C
Title: Re: future
Post by: bill t. on May 09, 2013, 05:36:37 pm
Secondly even photographs that do not have great aesthetic or monetary value are worth a great deal to historians. They tell stories about the ways people lived, how people dressed, how they lived, what they valued.

That's absolutely true!  What will interest the Future is the Flickr sections of Google's yearly internet snaps, and not the artistic magnum opuses we post here and elsewhere.  Ironic how so many of us strive to exclude the hand of man from our landscapes, the one thing that would most insure the ongoing relevance of our work.  And as examples of early twenty-first century fine art, I am pretty sure the Future will look to our video games.
Title: Re: future
Post by: Iluvmycam on May 09, 2013, 05:56:43 pm
OP...you have touched upon the last 6 months of my life's work.

In Nov 2012 I learned that my wife and estranged DIL will trash all my photography when I die. In short they hate it and are not too fond of me either. I'm getting old and health is poor. So, before it all ended up in the nearest dumpster I figured I better get my ass in gear.

In the past 6 months I have contacted a few hundred potential depositories for my work. I'm scaling back for summer and in Fall will continue with the around the world search to archive some of my work.

I have been successful with getting work into 19 museums and rare book libraries in the US, China and UK. (The rare book libraries accept a donated $5800 hand printed, hand bound, limited edition book into their reference dept.)

I have failed 100% with getting a PDF or flip book version of the same $5800 book into any library nationwide as a free donation with unlimited rights to reproduce it.

I have failed 100% getting any publisher interested in making the PDF into a ebook with me giving it to them royalty free.

I will give the PDF to Google books in 6 months or so if nothing happens. I'm not interested in fooling with ebooks, so that is why I am pushing it to someone else to do.

I am working on a POD book, but POD printing is not that great for the BW portion of my book. A short run, high quality offset printer charges $10,000 to do 100 softcover books. $100 per softcover 166 page book? Not unless your rich and want to give them away.

Here is a paragraph from my chapter on 'Preservation' from my book. The chapter opens with the importance of making prints in our age of 'no prints needed' digital viewing. If your digital masters are ever lost you can recover 90% to 95% of the image IQ from a scan of the master print.

But this part really touches on your question...

There is another benefit of making prints that may serve you well with the survival of your most important images. Digital images are just very easy to overlook, lose, or be trashed. Bottom line…if you have a beautiful print of your work, succeeding generations are more likely to keep it. Digital media is just too easy to overlook and discard.

I offered any 'museum quality members' of our group a chance to join my mailings to the museums. I offered to send your prints along with mine for donation to the top as well as the lesser museums around the world. Would have cost you nothing. You would only supply sleeved prints. I didn't get one taker.

But after having 6 months experience I can tell you it is an extremely speculative undertaking. It is only worthwhile if your dedicated to this goal and you print yourself or are rich and don't care.

By next year this time I hope to be in 25 museums (As well as the 13 the rare book libraries special collections I'm already in.)...but I stress HOPE!  Whenever you deal with a 'Board' or acquisition committee it is very fickle. With rare book libraries I have been successful with 20-25% of them.

After this plan if pretty complete, I have other plans to archive my work. But that is a year or two down the road.

The sad part of our work is this...the world is just polluted with photographs. 2 billion every week to Facebook alone. So the explosion with photographs has not made it easy for us to deal with this topic.
Title: Re: future
Post by: werner from aurora on May 09, 2013, 06:06:01 pm
    Peter, I think this is just not only a digital age question. I have boxes of pictures in the closet with the negs just sitting there. Some day either my daughter or grandchild will look through them. Will they save every single one and add more STUFF to their basement? They will probably keep the most interesting-forget about looking for the neg to go with it, and chuck the rest.  OH THE TRAGEDY!!!  That is why  I make 8x10 and 11x14 prints of my favorite shots. ( I am pretty fussy so this is not a huge collection). They sit in portfolio albums so they do not take up much space, and I figure the print size is large enough someone can scan it and reproduce it if they so choose.-O.K. wishful thinking here. If you think a shot is worth keeping for posterity-PRINT IT. Lately I have also been producing some of the picture books that are now widely available. They also do not take up a lot of space and are another way of preserving some of your best or most interesting pictures. I am starting to get into a rhythm where if I feel I have 50 or so shots worth preserving I put a book together. For me, this could be every 2 years-or every 6 years. It all depends,,,,,
   
Title: Re: future
Post by: Iluvmycam on May 09, 2013, 06:11:10 pm
    Peter, I think this is just not only a digital age question. I have boxes of pictures in the closet with the negs just sitting there. Some day either my daughter or grandchild will look through them. Will they save every single one and add more STUFF to their basement? They will probably keep the most interesting-forget about looking for the neg to go with it, and chuck the rest.  OH THE TRAGEDY!!!  That is why  I make 8x10 and 11x14 prints of my favorite shots. ( I am pretty fussy so this is not a huge collection). They sit in portfolio albums so they do not take up much space, and I figure the print size is large enough someone can scan it and reproduce it if they so choose.-O.K. wishful thinking here. If you think a shot is worth keeping for posterity-PRINT IT. Lately I have also been producing some of the picture books that are now widely available. They also do not take up a lot of space and are another way of preserving some of your best or most interesting pictures. I am starting to get into a rhythm where if I feel I have 50 or so shots worth preserving I put a book together. For me, this could be every 2 years-or every 6 years. It all depends,,,,,
   

Don't forget to put your name and date on the back of the prints and any special notes. Same with your digital images. People download them for free, we all know this.

Rebrand the image as

'Image Title' Copyright 2013 Jon Smith

Sure it can be wiped out and changed. But without it there is no chance for orphan digital images.

Make smaller prints too. (Letter and 11 x 14) Giant murals are tough to keep and can get messed up without care. Letter size are optimum for scanning.
Title: Re: future
Post by: werner from aurora on May 09, 2013, 06:34:26 pm
Good point about info on the back of the prints. Something I have not been doing.
Title: Re: future
Post by: Iluvmycam on May 09, 2013, 07:25:21 pm
Good point about info on the back of the prints. Something I have not been doing.

I prefer rag paper. The back readily accepts ink jet printing. Few RC papers work for back printing with ink jet - it is very iffy and they must be tested. I don't like labels, but they can be used as well. If you use RC, paper, you can stamp the backs with a 'Crown' ink that will dry. Regular stamp ink wont dry. I use Crown sometimes for work prints or give aways on RC, but no claims as to archival qualities. Sakura pens usually wont work on back of RC but work on front.

If some of you are grads from big schools with an art gallery, talk with them about your work. They may take your some as a donation. Or they may require a donation of $ with your prints for conservation if they are not that excited about your work.

Here is a list..

http://dir.yahoo.com/arts/museums__galleries__and_centers/colleges_and_universities/

I never donate $, I am not rich, I only offer donated prints or hand printed books. But I am tapering off with the limited edition books. They are a pain to print. I will have done 18 of them shortly...that's 2880 pages. And the rear cover requires 4 passes through the printer.

For getting into museums a 'name' helps in conjunction with the 'right body of work.' I have a body of work (just) but have no name. I was never into self promotion until Nov of 2012. I didn't care about it, just loved shooting. You develop a name by starting small and building on it. Or if lucky, you start big and only get bigger.

If I did what I'm doing now back 40 years ago I'd have been somebody with a name. Other side of the coin is this...I have shot next to nothing in the last 6 months. Preservation is like a full time job, no time for anything else.

How you approach the museum is of the utmost importance. You know the saying about first impressions. Took me many months to refine my approach. I never talk tax deduction either. Make it as simple as pie for them to accept - don't complicate matters.
Title: Re: future
Post by: Ellis Vener on May 15, 2013, 09:28:56 pm
The snag, Ellis, is that millions of similar images are already out there gathering dust. Unless my dust is better than your dust, then who'd care about my dust?
Rob C
It's not a matter of better, it's a matter of different Your dust is different than my dust.
Title: Re: future
Post by: jnmoore on May 16, 2013, 01:44:36 am
This is a very interesting question. Even if we are not famous most of us shooting seriously for years will have things that people may appreciate seeing in the future.

Some sort of foundation (maybe Google/Gates/Apple/Adobe would sponsor?) needs to established where we could will our digital collection to, within a determined usage framework? Can you imagine how big this collection might become after awhile? The world's biggest photo mine ...Your photos would live on (but maybe never looked at depending on the indexing resources available???) and would not be something your family has to worry about. Sitting behind my iMac right now is a Drobo with 8T capacity about half full of my work over many years. When I go I'm sure my family (expect for getting family photos) will not want to spend monthes going through all of this.

John

 

Title: Re: future
Post by: Iluvmycam on May 16, 2013, 08:04:57 am
This is a very interesting question. Even if we are not famous most of us shooting seriously for years will have things that people may appreciate seeing in the future.

Some sort of foundation (maybe Google/Gates/Apple/Adobe would sponsor?) needs to established where we could will our digital collection to, within a determined usage framework? Can you imagine how big this collection might become after awhile? The world's biggest photo mine ...Your photos would live on (but maybe never looked at depending on the indexing resources available???) and would not be something your family has to worry about. Sitting behind my iMac right now is a Drobo with 8T capacity about half full of my work over many years. When I go I'm sure my family (expect for getting family photos) will not want to spend monthes going through all of this.

John


One problem is you photogs have too much garbage mixed in with the few keepers that are decent. This may or may not apply to you, I don't know. But you look at some Flickrs and they are 77 pages of crap with a handful of keepers mixed in. Start a portfolio of your best work. and if you have something of historical significance, make a portfolio for it.

I'm looking at a few half-ass shots myself this morning. I'm trying to decide if they are worth including on a low res disc to send to museums and rare book libraries when I ship them my prints next week. They are not what I send out to get accepted. After I am accepted, I send them a disc of my book and print images and it has some extra images on them. Allows them to use it in their editorial / education use without having to scan prints.

It also allows my images a chance at surviving someplace else. And the curator may see something he or she likes on the disc and ask for it. They all low res jpegs, maybe 200 to 400 kb each. they could make a decnt 5 x7 or maybe a 8 x 10. (just)  I would like to send out higher res, but am not comfortable blasting them out all over the world. When I get older, if I send out discks. I will send out medium res images on disc.

We all have to let go of our crap and focus on the better work. But if that was the case, Eggelston and Shore would be nowhere - would they? So we may never really know when garbage will be treasured. But we have to try and balance this topic so we don't overload and turn off anyone searching through our images. When I see 77 pages of Flickr...I look at a few pages in the beginning, middle and end. That is all I can take of 'snapshots.'

Do an image search for your name on Goggle. See what pops up. About 20 of my photos come up from a Google. Make you images iconic and make them attached to your name. that is another area we can work in,
Title: Re: future
Post by: theguywitha645d on May 16, 2013, 12:01:32 pm
Well, if I can't get any money for them now, I don't know what the motivation for me is when they are valuable after I am dead.
Title: Re: future
Post by: Iluvmycam on May 16, 2013, 12:04:37 pm
Well, if I can't get any money for them now, I don't know what the motivation for me is when they are valuable after I am dead.

We don't do it for $...we do it for love of freezing time.

I've never made a penny with my photos. Most likely never will. But I would like for some of it to be archived - instead of ending up in the dumpster.
Title: Re: future
Post by: theguywitha645d on May 16, 2013, 01:05:44 pm
We don't do it for $...we do it for love of freezing time.

I wish I had a dollar for every time an editor or producer has used that for not wanting to pay for work. So, what do I do? Put my images in a archive so they can benefit from them? Most of those places have people actually getting paid for maintaining that. Wouldn't it be nice if artists and their work were actually valued.

Can't buy me love. And love can't pay the rent nor put food on the table. If no one values my work now, what changes when I am dead? Why would I want some corporation to simply get richer off what I did just because they can get it for free and then profit from it for as long as they exist. The guys that controls the Disfarmer and Meier work are doing well from it. But with companies like Google, they soon may just start stealing my work anyway.

Yes, photography is a passion, but why can't it be a livelihood too?
Title: Re: future
Post by: Iluvmycam on May 16, 2013, 01:33:48 pm
I wish I had a dollar for every time an editor or producer has used that for not wanting to pay for work. So, what do I do? Put my images in a archive so they can benefit from them? Most of those places have people actually getting paid for maintaining that. Wouldn't it be nice if artists and their work were actually valued.

Can't buy me love. And love can't pay the rent nor put food on the table. If no one values my work now, what changes when I am dead? Why would I want some corporation to simply get richer off what I did just because they can get it for free and then profit from it for as long as they exist. The guys that controls the Disfarmer and Meier work are doing well from it. But with companies like Google, they soon may just start stealing my work anyway.

Yes, photography is a passion, but why can't it be a livelihood too?

It can be a livelihood for the lucky few. As I've told you before, the world is polluted with photos. Great photos and crappy photos...POLUTTED! When there is an oversuppy the value of a thing goes down. So that is how it is with photos.

But it is more like like acting or art. Artists would do it and do do it for free. Same with photogs that love freezing time.

I'd like my photos to be worth millions. But to do that I have to go to a thrift store, buy some funny clothes, put on some funny make up, make a funny face, take a photo of myself and have a background photo shopped in. Now I have a  $4 million dolllar Cindy Sherman photo!

My concern is not making a few bucks from my pix, but with preserving them. You can have my share of the $ pot. OK!
Title: Re: future
Post by: theguywitha645d on May 16, 2013, 01:37:18 pm
You do understand this is the Pro Business section of the forum.

If you want a hobby, great. And as you pointed out, the world is full of photographs. What is the point of keeping the output from one person?
Title: Re: future
Post by: Iluvmycam on May 16, 2013, 01:39:36 pm
You do understand this is the Pro Business section of the forum.

If you want a hobby, great. And as you pointed out, the world is full of photographs. What is the point of keeping the output from one person?

The topic was with future preservation. If my feedback is not wanted, then no problem I will unsub from the thread.
Title: Re: future
Post by: bill t. on May 16, 2013, 02:20:51 pm
Maybe Google will establish an Old Photographs Home.  Fill up legions of hard drives with them, drop them off at the Smithsonian's door step in the middle of the night.  If the cost of mortar bricks keeps rising, this could be useful.

Of course, if future technologies can encode such amounts of data down to a physically small and enduring format, all the better.  Make a lot of those things, spread them around.  The only reasonable hope for image hoarding now is the that sometime within the lifetime of present media somebody will we able and willing to put it all into a manageable form about the size of a Rubix Cube.  Too bad the ancient Romans and Greeks  etc didn't do that, how fascinating their point & shoots would be.

But consider this...we are living in the first time in history when it is possible for every human on Earth to leave their image to posterity.  I'm gonna write a proposal right now to create a piece of art 6 feet high by 2000 miles long containing a 1 x 1.5 inch portrait of every living human being.  Awards will be given for Best Portrait and Cutest Baby, am looking for judging volunteers.

For the next project, every human being will submit their favorite snapshot at 4 x 6 inches.  That wall will extend 6 feet high by 1.3 times around the equator.  No cat pictures, and no slot canyon shots.
Title: Re: future
Post by: jnmoore on May 16, 2013, 03:42:22 pm
You are right that there would be a lot of redundant and not so hot photos but some of these rejects may hold some unknown significance for a historian looking at them 200 years from now. If you are archiving photos for historical or documentary purposes it is difficult to tell what should be eliminated. A very big diffuculyy, however, would be tagging the photos for search. The ability of compters to recognize faces and many other things is moving ahead quickly so it may not be a terrible issue in the future.

John
Title: Re: future
Post by: theguywitha645d on May 16, 2013, 04:09:34 pm
The topic was with future preservation. If my feedback is not wanted, then no problem I will unsub from the thread.

There is no problem with your feedback, but economics is a real part of this. Documents must have value or they will not be saved. Simply dismissing this by saying you do this for love and not money is very nice, but that will not stop folks from erasing your drives when you die. Your work has a better chance of surviving if it is valued during your lifetime.
Title: Re: future
Post by: Iluvmycam on May 16, 2013, 08:45:11 pm
There is no problem with your feedback, but economics is a real part of this. Documents must have value or they will not be saved. Simply dismissing this by saying you do this for love and not money is very nice, but that will not stop folks from erasing your drives when you die. Your work has a better chance of surviving if it is valued during your lifetime.

That is right. $ value helps a great deal. But the vast majority of us are not valued for $. Museums brag how they get 90%+ of their collection by donation. It is very hard to sell phjotos to museums or even to get them to take photos for free unless your a big name or they really want your work.

I shoot ugly photos, so they only have a value to collectors. And without a big name, collectors are not interested. Those are the problems I must deal with. Am trying to build more of a name.
Title: Re: future
Post by: louoates on May 17, 2013, 12:11:09 am
I'm in the process of doing some picture books of various subjects that happen to comprise some of my best work. Books seem to be as permanent as anything else I can foresee. A see zero possibilities of anything digital surviving very long, mainly due to "hey, I'm not wading through grandfather's 6 terabyte hard drives!"
In one of my series I use 80 to 120 year old black/white studio portraits as basis for composites. You can still find thousands of those portraits in antique malls and flea markets selling for $2-$5 ea. Most have the photographer's name/studio embossed into the frame. Not bad for longevity. And cheap ingredients for me.
My unsold prints usually end up in thrift stores selling for a buck apiece on a good day. I'm sure some of them end up thumb-tacked on the wall. At least they'll be enjoyed for a while.
After participating in several family estate house-clearances I understand how important it is to get rid of stuff. What was very important to Uncle Jim was just dumpster fodder for the descendants. I plan to specify that all electronic image files be disposed of within a week. Save the kids time and basement space.
just had a great idea. How about making a picture book of all your best work with the digital file stored right there in the book.
Title: Re: future
Post by: bill t. on May 17, 2013, 03:16:52 am
Through an automatic ebay search I found a carte de visite wedding portrait snapped 150 years ago by a photographer who shared my full name.  I'm sure I was the first person in quite a while to care he had ever existed.  Was very poignant for me in a way I still don't really understand.

(http://img.auctiva.com/imgdata/1/0/0/6/5/7/webimg/544163223_tp.jpg)

What is the basis of this strange urge to have our works survive us?

************************************************

Ozymandius

by Percy Bysshe Shelley

I met a traveler from an antique land
Who said: "Two vast and trunkless legs of stone
Stand in the desert... Near them, on the sand,
Half sunk a shattered visage lies, whose frown,
And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command,
Tell that its sculptor well those passions read
Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things,
The hand that mocked them and the heart that fed;
And on the pedestal these words appear:
My name is Ozymandius, King of Kings,
Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!
Nothing beside remains.  Round the decay
Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare
The lone and level sands stretch far away.

Title: Re: future
Post by: Rob C on May 17, 2013, 04:35:04 am
1.  I believe that it's a fruitless quest;

2.  I believe that it stems from ego;

3.  I believe that, further, it reflects a fear of death;

4.  I also believe that recent archaeological tv shows have a lot for which to answer, filling the screen with a pile of utterly redundant information.


If, as I accept, my own recent past is as dead as the dodo, then why would an even more distant one matter at all? The lessons of the broader world history are all well-known; there is no real value in further exploration beyond the personal satisfaction of an academia able to chisel out the funds to continue in that search amongst the detritus of time.

That anyone is willing to live on their knees, scraping at mud, says more to me than it must to the kneeler.

I'd rather bore myself even further by sitting in a bar watching a daily Spanish cookery programme. At least on the one that comes, de rigueur, with my menu del dia, there are two fine, stretched aprons to engage the mind and distract from the fare I eat. Even the Spanish news girls are more attractive than the ones on Sky, never mind the cooks!

(Yesterday afternoon I figured out how to load music off a pendrive onto my cellphone; I shall now be able to eat, watch the aprons and listen to rock 'n' roll all at the same time! I am so pleased that I eventually understood how to convert all those cassettes into mp3.)

Happy shooting, but go easy on the printing: you don't really need it.

Rob C

Title: Re: future
Post by: Iluvmycam on May 17, 2013, 11:31:22 am
Through an automatic ebay search I found a carte de visite wedding portrait snapped 150 years ago by a photographer who shared my full name.  I'm sure I was the first person in quite a while to care he had ever existed.  Was very poignant for me in a way I still don't really understand.

(http://img.auctiva.com/imgdata/1/0/0/6/5/7/webimg/544163223_tp.jpg)

What is the basis of this strange urge to have our works survive us?

************************************************

Ozymandius

by Percy Bysshe Shelley

I met a traveler from an antique land
Who said: "Two vast and trunkless legs of stone
Stand in the desert... Near them, on the sand,
Half sunk a shattered visage lies, whose frown,
And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command,
Tell that its sculptor well those passions read
Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things,
The hand that mocked them and the heart that fed;
And on the pedestal these words appear:
My name is Ozymandius, King of Kings,
Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!
Nothing beside remains.  Round the decay
Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare
The lone and level sands stretch far away.



If nothing else, I feel an obligation to the people I have memorialized to try and preserve their story. Many of them have died. So it would be nice to archive something about their life.

I think most humans would like their life's work passed on in some way from generation to generation as opposed to having it all end up as trash in a landfill.

Ebay is also a good source to see what prints do sell for. Search for 'silver gelatin prints.'
Title: Re: future
Post by: Iluvmycam on May 17, 2013, 11:35:24 am
I'm in the process of doing some picture books of various subjects that happen to comprise some of my best work. Books seem to be as permanent as anything else I can foresee. A see zero possibilities of anything digital surviving very long, mainly due to "hey, I'm not wading through grandfather's 6 terabyte hard drives!"
In one of my series I use 80 to 120 year old black/white studio portraits as basis for composites. You can still find thousands of those portraits in antique malls and flea markets selling for $2-$5 ea. Most have the photographer's name/studio embossed into the frame. Not bad for longevity. And cheap ingredients for me.
My unsold prints usually end up in thrift stores selling for a buck apiece on a good day. I'm sure some of them end up thumb-tacked on the wall. At least they'll be enjoyed for a while.
After participating in several family estate house-clearances I understand how important it is to get rid of stuff. What was very important to Uncle Jim was just dumpster fodder for the descendants. I plan to specify that all electronic image files be disposed of within a week. Save the kids time and basement space.
just had a great idea. How about making a picture book of all your best work with the digital file stored right there in the book.

Yes, photo books are a way to archive some of our work. Write to publishers of photo books. If that does not work out, try Blurb. Or if you want to get a better price, use a good short run printer.
Title: Re: future
Post by: Iluvmycam on May 17, 2013, 11:41:17 am
Since $ was brought up as a foundation for preservation. A good exercise for you to do would be to see where you fit into the economics of prints sales. You can do this by checking with photo galleries to see if they will represent you.

Here is a listing of galleries in the US.

http://art-support.com/galleries.htm
Title: Re: future
Post by: DeanChriss on May 17, 2013, 04:17:10 pm
Prints, people, mountains, planets, solar systems, galaxies, and the universe itself have beginnings and endings. Change fills the time between. Everything is transient. Relative to mountains and planets things like people and paper are just a flash in the pan. The best anyone can hope to do is have a bright flash.
Title: Re: future
Post by: Alan Klein on June 25, 2013, 10:04:00 pm
Some related thoughts on this and that.

When you die, your wife's next husband will throw out all your pictures.

Dust to dust.

Do people who freeze their bodies cryogenically after death really expect to come back some day?  Maybe they can freeze your negatives with you.  Maybe,  I'll be more famous after I'm dead than now.  Can't wait!  

All kidding aside, if you want to be remembered and your photography too, make prints and frame them beautifully.  Then give them as gifts to friends and families.  They will mount them on the walls of their homes (maybe).  Then they will preserve your work with the added benefit of you getting a really nice thank you every time you visit their house while you're still alive.  Enjoy your posterity now.
Title: Re: future
Post by: Iluvmycam on June 26, 2013, 07:26:59 am
Prints, people, mountains, planets, solar systems, galaxies, and the universe itself have beginnings and endings. Change fills the time between. Everything is transient. Relative to mountains and planets things like people and paper are just a flash in the pan. The best anyone can hope to do is have a bright flash.

Yes, all true. But we try to maximize our stay.
Title: Re: future
Post by: Iluvmycam on June 26, 2013, 07:30:05 am
Some related thoughts on this and that.

When you die, your wife's next husband will throw out all your pictures.

Dust to dust.

Do people who freeze their bodies cryogenically after death really expect to come back some day?  Maybe they can freeze your negatives with you.  Maybe,  I'll be more famous after I'm dead than now.  Can't wait!  

All kidding aside, if you want to be remembered and your photography too, make prints and frame them beautifully.  Then give them as gifts to friends and families.  They will mount them on the walls of their homes (maybe).  Then they will preserve your work with the added benefit of you getting a really nice thank you every time you visit their house while you're still alive.  Enjoy your posterity now.

My work is of the ugly variety. No one would hang it up. Just museums or collectors would keep some in their collections. I have had some success with getting my work placed. But very, very tough work. In 7 months, 340 solicitations and maybe 22 placements out of the 340.
Title: Re: future
Post by: Rob C on June 26, 2013, 02:39:03 pm
My work is of the ugly variety. No one would hang it up. Just museums or collectors would keep some in their collections. I have had some success with getting my work placed. But very, very tough work. In 7 months, 340 solicitations and maybe 22 placements out of the 340.


In any other endeavour (or context!), people would say: buddy, isn't this telling you something?

Rob C
Title: Re: future
Post by: framah on June 30, 2013, 12:28:30 pm
Some related thoughts on this and that.

When you die, your wife's next husband will throw out all your pictures.

Dust to dust.

Do people who freeze their bodies cryogenically after death really expect to come back some day?  Maybe they can freeze your negatives with you.  Maybe,  I'll be more famous after I'm dead than now.  Can't wait!  

All kidding aside, if you want to be remembered and your photography too, make prints and frame them beautifully.  Then give them as gifts to friends and families.  They will mount them on the walls of their homes (maybe).  Then they will preserve your work with the added benefit of you getting a really nice thank you every time you visit their house while you're still alive.  Enjoy your posterity now.


The answer to ALL of this is right here in that quote!!!
   
FRAME THEM BEAUTIFULLY!!! Yep!! That's it, right there!  ...plus, then I get to keep paying for my Mercedes!!
Title: Re: future
Post by: Iluvmycam on June 30, 2013, 01:11:21 pm

In any other endeavour (or context!), people would say: buddy, isn't this telling you something?

Rob C

Well you give it a try with your 'pretty' photos. Send them out to museums and see what response you get?
Title: Re: future
Post by: Iluvmycam on June 30, 2013, 01:13:32 pm
Antother area you guys or gals can archive photos at is the Wiki Commons.

I put all my 2nd rate stuff there. Things that are not museum worthy, but things I am not embarrassed to have connected with my name.
Title: Re: future
Post by: Iluvmycam on June 30, 2013, 01:15:07 pm
Yea Pete. I lost 2 decades of work from a flood. I feel the pain. I am very careful now before I lose more.
Title: Re: future
Post by: Rob C on August 16, 2013, 04:19:41 pm
Well you give it a try with your 'pretty' photos. Send them out to museums and see what response you get?



No point: wrong market.

Rob C