Luminous Landscape Forum

Equipment & Techniques => Digital Asset Management => Topic started by: mdijb on July 05, 2020, 06:00:57 pm

Title: Online Backup Storage.
Post by: mdijb on July 05, 2020, 06:00:57 pm
I use a Drobo for holding all my images and other stuff, as my onsite, primary backup.  I want to Backup everything on the DROBO to an offline location for extra security.  THe drive contain multiple terabites of data.

My initial research indicates that my need for multiple TB exceeds the capacity of the various services, like Backblaze for example.

What would the community suggest to get this accomplished?

MDIJB
Title: Re: Online Backup Storage.
Post by: jrsforums on July 05, 2020, 07:20:40 pm
I use CrashPlan
Title: Re: Online Backup Storage.
Post by: digitaldog on July 05, 2020, 09:17:52 pm
I used CrashPlan for years but it got too expensive consider the alternatives so I switched for far less and now use BackBlaze. I'm quite happy with the product.
Title: Re: Online Backup Storage.
Post by: PeterAit on July 06, 2020, 08:12:26 am
You can buy a 5 TB disk for $125. Get two for redundancy. Back up to those and keep in a safe deposit box.
Title: Re: Online Backup Storage.
Post by: HCS on July 07, 2020, 03:50:48 am
i backup to a synology nas each night.
i continuously backup to crashplan (US).
i continuously backup to jottacloud (EU).

My total dataset backed up is roughly 8Tb. Crashplan has increased its price, but still worth it. Jottacloud is cheaper, but slows down above 5Tb (but still on par with crashplan).

Just backing up to hard drives in the same building doesn't give enough security, at least for me. The roughly 20 bucks a month for the online backups are worth it to me. My collection is largely personal stuff.
Title: Re: Online Backup Storage.
Post by: digitaldog on July 07, 2020, 07:53:24 am
Exactly. Multiple drive backups AND off site (daily) cloud backup is belt and suspenders approach.
Title: Re: Online Backup Storage.
Post by: Joe Towner on July 08, 2020, 09:47:14 am
This is a relative easy discussion.  You've got a device that plugs directly into your computer, which means that the normal $6/month BackBlaze plan will back up the data on it.  How many TB's are you talking about? What's your upload speed like - go to speedtest.net to find out?  You'll want a local copy in addition to the Drobo, so the basic 8tb external USB3 drives.

The only concern is that you'll most likely want to do a full local backup, install the cloud backup then block all the non-current directories. As the first upload take a while, getting the current stuff uploaded is more important. As it finishes remove the blocks on the directories so they get uploaded as well.
Title: Re: Online Backup Storage.
Post by: DP on July 08, 2020, 10:31:23 pm
not sure if it is important for the poster but he might need to pay attention to versions retention... code42 (crashplan) has unlimited (time-wise) tunable retention of file versions (say you got a byte corrupted - you have 2 versions still or deleted files), but backblaze does not offer this (is it only like a month for it)... it may or may not be important, so there is a value behind the price still.
Title: Re: Online Backup Storage.
Post by: digitaldog on July 08, 2020, 11:01:13 pm
not sure if it is important for the poster but he might need to pay attention to versions retention... code42 (crashplan) has unlimited (time-wise) tunable retention of file versions (say you got a byte corrupted - you have 2 versions still or deleted files), but backblaze does not offer this (is it only like a month for it)... it may or may not be important, so there is a value behind the price still.
Backblaze offers the option below at a slightly higher price. But no need if you have Time Machine.

Keep your old files versions for 1-Year or Forever
Backblaze keeps old file versions and deleted files for 30-days.
Now you can extend that time up to 1-Year for an additional $2/Month.
Title: Re: Online Backup Storage.
Post by: rdonson on July 09, 2020, 12:57:38 pm
There are simpler solutions perhaps to spending a month or two to upload a Drobo with several TB to an online service.

Buy another Drobo.  Copy the data on your existing Drobo to the second Drobo using software such as Carbon Copy Cloner or similar offerings. 

If you have a relative or friend nearby you can store Drobo #2 at their place.  Periodically take Drobo #2 home and update it from your first Drobo and then return it back to your relative/friends house. 

Not a high tech solution but it can work depending on your needs.  If you're running a business then this probably wouldn't be an ideal solution.
Title: Re: Online Backup Storage.
Post by: budjames on July 10, 2020, 06:13:40 am
I have 9TB of images in my photo archives, 25+ years of images.

Cloud services are too slow and expensive for me. I explored several solutions and settled on the using Synology Diskstations. My iMacPro supports 10gb Ethernet so I installed a 10GBE switch on my home network to connect to a Synology DiskStation DS1819+ on my network. I have a second DS1819+ installed in my office, 10 miles away.

Using the free application, Synology Drive, the external 8TB OWC Thunderblade SSD drive connected via Thunderbolt 2 to my iMacPro is automatically backed up, real time, to the DS1819+ on my home network. Changes on my network drive are automatically backed up to the DS1819+ installed in my office. The transfer speed to the remote network ranges from 10-32MB/sec.

The DS1819+ units have 8 drive bays. I installed Seagate IronWolf 6TB NAS drives into both units. Synology Hybrid RAID is their proprietary multi-drive set up that gives you the benefits of Drobo's system but with faster transfer rates. This allows you to add drives of any size or make to your expand your RAID. It works great, however, the only limitation, unlike Drobo, is that if you replace a failed drive, you must replace the drive with one of the same size or larger.

I have security cameras in my home and at the office. The same DiskStation is also the hub for my security system using Synology Surveillance Station application. The video files capture by my home security system is real time backed up to the office unit and visa versa.

After a few years, I have found Synology drives to be very reliable, fast and quiet. They are not cheap, but they do offer 2 and 4 bay models so you can get started with a more modest investment. Highly recommended!

Regards,
Bud James

Please check out my fine art and travel photography at www.budjames.photography or on Instagram at www.instagram.com/budjamesphoto.
Title: Re: Online Backup Storage.
Post by: DP on July 10, 2020, 08:38:06 pm
But no need if you have Time Machine.

time machine does cloud backup now ? because if you local storage goes kaboom then what ? you want to use backblaze to backup that database ? it still does not keep anything forever and add the hassle in piling stuff ... oops - https://help.backblaze.com/hc/en-us/articles/217665558-Backblaze-doesn-t-backup-Time-Machine - not sure it is still the case (not a user of such stuff)

Now you can extend that time up to 1-Year for an additional $2/Month.

does not matter - still limited - with code42 (crashplan) it is forever with tunable granularity, with backblaze it is still limited...
Title: Re: Online Backup Storage.
Post by: digitaldog on July 10, 2020, 08:55:13 pm
time machine does cloud backup now ?
What makes you think it would? Or can't? BTW, it CAN: https://www.cloudstoragereviews.co/best-practices/backup-time-machine-to-cloud.html
TM does as you wrote (confusingly): tunable retention of file versions.
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because if you local storage goes kaboom then what ?
The same thing that would happen if the cloud storage when kaboom. Which is why one has multiple backups. Even so called tunable retention of file versions. With TM and/or other products that provide that kind of backup.
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does not matter - still limited - with code42 (crashplan) it is forever with tunable granularity, with backblaze it is still limited...
Code42 isn't the same as TM, TM isn't the same as Backblaze (the actual name of the product).
The really sad comment that's ridiculous is: "it is forever". 🤮
Title: Re: Online Backup Storage.
Post by: DP on July 11, 2020, 10:25:02 am
What makes you think it would? Or can't? BTW, it CAN: https://www.cloudstoragereviews.co/best-practices/backup-time-machine-to-cloud.html

so it, itself, can't - you must pile extra software to do this... 


What makes you think it would? Or can't? BTW, it CAN: http
TM does as you wrote (confusingly): tunable retention of file versions.

TM is a local backup - you need extra crouches to move its database into some cloud  (that is NOT to say that you shall not use timemachine, specifically after being crippled by using backblaze in attempt to save few bucks   ;D  ) ... code42 (crashplan) is a single cloud backup solution - topic is about online backups


 The same thing that would happen if the cloud storage when kaboom.

you personal local backup has way more chances to do this than cloud storage from a reputable company

With TM and/or other products that provide that kind of backup.

TM has a limit on how long and what it keeps - that makes it a crippled online backup solution for people trying to save few bucks... I understand why somebody in 10th-world country can do this, but the last time I checked someone resides still in USA and not working as a bracero.
Title: Re: Online Backup Storage.
Post by: DP on July 11, 2020, 10:26:33 am
https://www.cloudwards.net/crashplan-vs-backblaze/
Title: Re: Online Backup Storage.
Post by: digitaldog on July 11, 2020, 10:57:32 am
so it, itself, can't - you must pile extra software to do this... 
If you want it to (seems silly), you can. Those are the facts. Ignore them (again) if you please.
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TM is a local backup - you need extra crouches to move its database into some cloud
It is a local backup until it isn't.
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you personal local backup has way more chances to do this than cloud storage from a reputable company
I have TM. I have an archive of old TM backups. I have multiple on site drives that I swap into and out of a fire proof safe. I have Blackblaze; a reputable company. That's what I have. What other's do is up to them.
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TM has a limit on how long and what it keeps
No, it really doesn't. There's a limit to what can be stored on any drive. One can create as many TM's as they desire and like I did, archive older ones as I have. You are the one that insists, without proof, that something is 'forever'.  :P
Do tell us what would happen to your forever Crashplan data if Crashplan went out of business or as you suggest, "kaboom'? Forever, right....
Not much is forever other than human stupidity and eventually, when the sun explodes, that might be the end of humanity but never of us will likely be around to worry about it.
I have nothing against Crashplan; I was a customer for like 6 years. I decided I didn't need to spend unnecessary extra money for it and switched last year to Backblaze. The OP or anyone else can do the same but the bottom line is, with TM, I have iteration of data and I could, if I wanted to, move that to the cloud.
I'm sorry the universal decision not to use Crashplan ruffles your delicate feathers. It is a fine offering but it isn't necessary for everyone!
Title: Re: Online Backup Storage.
Post by: jrsforums on July 11, 2020, 12:32:58 pm
https://www.cloudwards.net/crashplan-vs-backblaze/

Thank you.  This is a very complete analysis.  Reinforces why I choose and stay with Crashplan. 

Other recommended backup plan is an amalgam of patchwork to do what Crashplan does.
Title: Re: Online Backup Storage.
Post by: Joe Towner on July 14, 2020, 05:49:18 pm
TM has a limit on how long and what it keeps - that makes it a crippled online backup solution for people trying to save few bucks... I understand why somebody in 10th-world country can do this, but the last time I checked someone resides still in USA and not working as a bracero.

Having a hard time separating the incorrect answer from the insult. TimeMachine is a valid, very usable backup solution that does more than either BackBlaze or Crashplan.  Try doing an OS level reinstall from any cloud provider.  Or moving to a new Mac.  For folks working off a single drive, especially an internal one, there isn't a simpler product THAT JUST WORKS.

Are there better things like cloning your OS drive, or multiple stage backups, yes. But for a simple backup, plug in a drive, format it APFS & turn on TimeMachine beats not having one hands down.  Works for folks on limited internet, or even completely offline.

Has CrashPlan shutdown their 'home' product before, yep. https://www.theverge.com/2017/8/22/16184430/crashplan-home-shutting-down

Online storage is a race to the bottom - lowest price for unlimited storage. It's not sustainable as a business model.  For every terabyte you upload, someone has to spend more than a few bucks every month to manage, maintain & replicate your data.  Start reading into the cost structure of this business and start to worry.  Code42 did the pivot away from the consumer plans because it's a money losing space.  I expect once they go public there will be a shift to higher margins & doing things like setting a minimum number of seats.

The 'forever' storage isn't a realistic plan.  If you want to archive data, that's a separate product space & things like tape drives, B2 or AWS Glacier come into play.  A continuously incremental backup will fail far more often than anyone wants to admit.  Any issue in that file/block chain, and you're completely screwed & re-uploading everything.  TimeMachine does a pretty good job of rolling up data (days into weeks, weeks into months, etc), and having to start a fresh backup is a good time to swap out the backup drive for a new one.

Everything you backup to a cloud will be deleted once you stop paying the bill.  A stack of drives at home offsite can be read by others, so if you have kids, make sure they know where to look if something happens to you.

-Joe
Title: Re: Online Backup Storage.
Post by: BobShaw on July 15, 2020, 01:29:48 am
TM has a limit on how long and what it keeps - that makes it a crippled online backup solution for people trying to save few bucks... I understand why somebody in 10th-world country can do this, but the last time I checked someone resides still in USA and not working as a bracero.

The limit for TimeMachine is how big the disk is. Nothing else. I have a Drobo for long term storage that will (hopefully) never fill up. The backups go back to the day I got it and on some smaller disks 2014. The current hourly backups are on three rotating 6TB drives, one of which is always offsite.
As for the US superiority in solutions, how is that Covid thing going?
Title: Re: Online Backup Storage.
Post by: JeffSD on July 19, 2020, 04:10:02 pm
Here's a backup plan I developed after stupidly losing some data (fortunately, not too much) from a drive failure a few years ago:

1. Time Machine on a dedicated hard drive (6TB) in my old, but trusty, Mac Pro.

2. Backblaze. $55 a year (on the two year plan) for unlimited cloud storage seemed reasonable to me.

3. A bootable copy of my operating system SSD (with all applications, Lightroom catalog, backups, etc.) that I keep onsite.

4. A second bootable copy of my operating system SSD and copies of all data drives that are kept in a safety deposit box. I try to update them monthly. Carbon Copy Cloner is used to copy my drives and it works great.

This plan might be overkill, but here's my thinking:

Time Machine is great, but useless if there's a fire, or my computer gets stolen. Ditto any onsite backups.

Cloud storage is great, but web recovery is slow. Backblaze's restore by mail option is nice (up to 8TB for $189 which is refunded if you return the drive within 30 days) but it still takes time. Also, as good as cloud storage is, you're relying on a third party to be around when you need them. Odds are they will be, but it's not 100%. Hence, the copies in a safety deposit box.

I'm probably still at risk for nuclear armageddon. I need to work on that.  ;D

Best,
Jeff

 
Title: Re: Online Backup Storage.
Post by: fdisilvestro on July 19, 2020, 05:34:16 pm

This plan might be overkill
 

There is no such a thing as too many backups.


I'm probably still at risk for nuclear armageddon. I need to work on that.  ;D
 

Maybe in the not so distant future, there will be companies offering backups in the Moon or Mars to protect your data from E.L.E. :)
Title: Re: Online Backup Storage.
Post by: JeffSD on July 21, 2020, 12:46:13 am
Maybe in the not so distant future, there will be companies offering backups in the Moon or Mars to protect your data from E.L.E. :)

Excellent!

Sign me up for the first server farm on the dark side of the moon.  ;)
Title: Re: Online Backup Storage.
Post by: andyptak on October 14, 2020, 05:54:49 pm
After I discovered that my Amazon Prime membership covered unlimited photo back up to Amazon Drive I started backing up my 200K plus shots and let a spare machine run day and night doing it.

Then I discovered a fatal flaw on Amazon's end - the number of shots may be unlimited but large files and or unsupported formats won't copy - could be a time out thing, or just a rejection, I'm not sure. After weeks of uploading i found out that that thousands of shots didn't upload to Drive. It doesn't give file numbers for the failed upload files so I'm not sure of their particulars, but I do know for sure that PSB's didn't load.
Title: Re: Online Backup Storage.
Post by: Rajan Parrikar on November 23, 2020, 06:11:37 am
I settled on IDrive (www.idrive.com). Backblaze is very good if you have one computer and everything on it to back up. IDrive allows you to pick and choose folders from external drives over multiple computers.
Title: Re: Online Backup Storage.
Post by: chez on November 23, 2020, 11:16:12 am
You can buy a 5 TB disk for $125. Get two for redundancy. Back up to those and keep in a safe deposit box.

How often are you going to do this? Are you also going to verify the disks on a regular basis?

With an automated online backup system, you can be backed up everyday. Some online backup systems even keep deleted files for a month so you can recover from a mistake.
Title: Re: Online Backup Storage.
Post by: digitaldog on November 23, 2020, 11:38:14 am
Are you also going to verify the disks on a regular basis?
Doable every time one backs up.
Title: Re: Online Backup Storage.
Post by: Alan Klein on November 23, 2020, 11:41:24 am
Since I'm retired and have no business requirements for backup, my WD Passport 4tb drive works fine to backup my computer.  If my house burns down taking the disk, I'll have more problems than worrying about missing personal data and photos. What did people do before computers?  If I had a business, then definitely I would use cloud storage.  It's always the last month or two that's critical.  If you're a wedding photographer, those are the photos you need to give to your clients.  Older ones have already been sold. 
Title: Re: Online Backup Storage.
Post by: Rajan Parrikar on November 23, 2020, 11:47:58 am
If my house burns down taking the disk, I'll have more problems than worrying about missing personal data and photos.

What happens after you survive and put your life back together, as is often the case following such events? Wouldn't you want your files back?
Title: Re: Online Backup Storage.
Post by: digitaldog on November 23, 2020, 11:50:08 am
Since I'm retired and have no business requirements for backup, my WD Passport 4tb drive works fine to backup my computer.  If my house burns down taking the disk, I'll have more problems than worrying about missing personal data and photos.
They had fire proof safes, safe deposit boxes and there have been professional photo storage services for decades: http://www.filmstorage.net. Had you actually searched for answers, you'd have found them...
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Older ones have already been sold.
As you've never been a professional photographer, let me point out, many/most actual pro's sell usage/rights to use photo's, rarely buyouts to them and retain their copyrights. 
Title: Re: Online Backup Storage.
Post by: chez on November 23, 2020, 11:52:37 am
Doable every time one backs up.

I know it's doable, but will one do it? After not finding any issues for a few months, how diligent will one be to continue testing their backup devices?

Speaking from experience, I've had a problem with a drive that backed up my files just fine without any complaints, but on retrieval of the files, some could not be retrieved...disk errors.
Title: Re: Online Backup Storage.
Post by: digitaldog on November 23, 2020, 11:55:32 am
I know it's doable, but will one do it?
With the applications I use for backup, it all takes place at the same time. The answer for some is; YES!
The reason one keeps multiple clones of the backup and rotates them as they backup and verify, is to greatly reduce the possibility of data loss.
Hardly rocket science.
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Speaking from experience, I've had a problem with a drive that backed up my files just fine without any complaints, but on retrieval of the files, some could not be retrieved...disk errors.
And IF this was the only disk/drive with a backup, you failed to produce a very good backup schema. Disks fail, which is why smart backup plans take redundancy into Account.
Hardly rocket science.
Title: Re: Online Backup Storage.
Post by: chez on November 23, 2020, 11:55:42 am
Since I'm retired and have no business requirements for backup, my WD Passport 4tb drive works fine to backup my computer.  If my house burns down taking the disk, I'll have more problems than worrying about missing personal data and photos. What did people do before computers?  If I had a business, then definitely I would use cloud storage.  It's always the last month or two that's critical.  If you're a wedding photographer, those are the photos you need to give to your clients.  Older ones have already been sold.

The studio that did our formal wedding photos burned down, taking with it all the wedding negatives. The photographer had many irrate customers.

Today we have more options. As a business, this should never happen.
Title: Re: Online Backup Storage.
Post by: chez on November 23, 2020, 11:58:22 am
With the applications I use for backup, it all takes place at the same time. The answer for some is; YES!
The reason one keeps multiple clones of the backup and rotates them as they backup and verify, is to greatly reduce the possibility of data loss.
Hardly rocket science. And IF this was the only disk/drive with a backup, you failed to produce a very good backup schema. Disks fail, which is why smart backup plans take redundancy into Account.
Hardly rocket science.

What's hardly rocket science is using an online backup service.

Title: Re: Online Backup Storage.
Post by: digitaldog on November 23, 2020, 11:59:20 am
What's hardly rocket science is using an online backup service.
Which I do, along with multiple ON SITE rotated backups. Online backup alone, not good enough!
Title: Re: Online Backup Storage.
Post by: Alan Klein on November 23, 2020, 12:10:37 pm
What happens after you survive and put your life back together, as is often the case following such events? Wouldn't you want your files back?

You just reminded me that if I dropped dead of a heart attack, my wife would't know how to get into the files in any case.  I just asked her if she would like to sit down with me to go over the procedures. She said, "Not now."  :)
Title: Re: Online Backup Storage.
Post by: Alan Klein on November 23, 2020, 12:12:28 pm
They had fire proof safes, safe deposit boxes and there have been professional photo storage services for decades: http://www.filmstorage.net. Had you actually searched for answers, you'd have found them... As you've never been a professional photographer, let me point out, many/most actual pro's sell usage/rights to use photo's, rarely buyouts to them and retain their copyrights. 
I agree that if I was a pro, I'd definitely get cloud backup.  And other backup if I was a pro in the old days. 
Title: Re: Online Backup Storage.
Post by: digitaldog on November 23, 2020, 12:16:38 pm
I agree that if I was a pro, I'd definitely get cloud backup.  And other backup if I was a pro in the old days.
What does being a Pro have to do with safely storing stuff you don't wish to lose? Don't answer, it's not worth it for either of us I'm quite certain.  ;) I'm in violent agreement with your wife: She and now I have said, "Not now."
Title: Re: Online Backup Storage.
Post by: Joe Towner on November 24, 2020, 07:32:57 pm
I'm shocked to see this much traffic on the topic without mention of Google killing their free unlimited storage for Google Photos.

Yes, it sucks to have to cover 'in the event I fall over' topics.  In reality it should be at least 2 since she may pass at the same time. 

For your family sake, having a clue where to look for is really helpful.  As the designated photographer, you are most likely in possession of the most important images of other peoples lives.  The images that would be a slide show for a future wedding, birthday or life celebration.  An external drive is great because you can either plug it in & access data, with no skills.  Online accounts become more involved, especially if timing hits & the subscription renewal fails & X amount of time has passed.

Using a password manager with an Emergency Kit can save a lot of work later on.
Title: Re: Online Backup Storage.
Post by: Alan Klein on November 24, 2020, 08:31:16 pm
I'm shocked to see this much traffic on the topic without mention of Google killing their free unlimited storage for Google Photos.

Yes, it sucks to have to cover 'in the event I fall over' topics.  In reality it should be at least 2 since she may pass at the same time. 

For your family sake, having a clue where to look for is really helpful.  As the designated photographer, you are most likely in possession of the most important images of other peoples lives.  The images that would be a slide show for a future wedding, birthday or life celebration.  An external drive is great because you can either plug it in & access data, with no skills.  Online accounts become more involved, especially if timing hits & the subscription renewal fails & X amount of time has passed.

Using a password manager with an Emergency Kit can save a lot of work later on.
You just gave me an interesting question.  So you pay for your cloud service with a monthly charge to your credit card.  You die and the credit card is invalidated (let's say-it's suppose to be).  So the cloud deletes all your files before your spouse figures out what's going on.

How do people deal with death and cloud payments? Do you leave notes for your spouse hanging off the computer?  Do you put Passwords in your will?  ;) 
Title: Re: Online Backup Storage.
Post by: digitaldog on November 24, 2020, 08:36:14 pm
You just gave me an interesting question.  So you pay for your cloud service with a monthly charge to your credit card.  You die and the credit card is invalidated (let's say-it's suppose to be).  So the cloud deletes all your files before your spouse figures out what's going on.

How do people deal with death and cloud payments? Do you leave notes for your spouse hanging off the computer?  Do you put Passwords in your will?  ;)
Think.
Of course the concept of subscribers paying by credit card for all kinds of services other than cloud backups is foreign to you?
Think.
"To find the exact answer, one must first ask the exact question."
-S. Tobin Webster

Title: Re: Online Backup Storage.
Post by: Alan Klein on November 24, 2020, 08:44:48 pm
Think.
Of course the concept of subscribers paying by credit card for all kinds of services other than cloud backups is foreign to you?
Think.
"To find the exact answer, one must first ask the exact question."
-S. Tobin Webster


Well, I never died. So I'm not familiar with what happens then.  ;)  Let's see if someone else has a better answer than you. 
Title: Re: Online Backup Storage.
Post by: digitaldog on November 24, 2020, 08:48:33 pm
Well, I never died. So I'm not familiar with what happens then.  ;) 
There is much you're not familiar with but death will come sir. Think. It's really not that hard. Your question (and the answers) are not really that interesting nor difficult to solve. Think. Or do you want a canned answer (yes, do tell your wife about your cloud storage and maybe, your subscription to that porn web site).  ;D
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Do you leave notes for your spouse hanging off the computer?
Does she know how to use one any better than her husband? Hopefully yours does.  ;D
Title: Re: Online Backup Storage.
Post by: chez on November 24, 2020, 10:05:57 pm
You just gave me an interesting question.  So you pay for your cloud service with a monthly charge to your credit card.  You die and the credit card is invalidated (let's say-it's suppose to be).  So the cloud deletes all your files before your spouse figures out what's going on.

How do people deal with death and cloud payments? Do you leave notes for your spouse hanging off the computer?  Do you put Passwords in your will?  ;)

Along with my cloud based backup, I also keep hard drives at home that contain all my photos. It would be these hard drives that get passed onto others.

People may think no one would be interested in your photos when you pass...but you would be wrong. A few years ago when both my parents died and we had the job of clearing out their house, I collected all the old negatives and photos that they collected...many from their parents ( my grand parents ). I scanned them and made a 11x14 book of these old images. I showed the book to my uncle and it brought tears to his eyes and he ordered 4 copies, one for himself and one for each of his children. In all, I had to make 23 copies of the book for various members of my extended family.

You'd think my grandfather most thought like many here...who would ever want to see my photos when I'm gone...you'd be amazed.

Title: Re: Online Backup Storage.
Post by: Joe Towner on November 25, 2020, 03:07:42 pm
You just gave me an interesting question.  So you pay for your cloud service with a monthly charge to your credit card.  You die and the credit card is invalidated (let's say-it's suppose to be).  So the cloud deletes all your files before your spouse figures out what's going on.

How do people deal with death and cloud payments? Do you leave notes for your spouse hanging off the computer?  Do you put Passwords in your will?  ;)

Yes.  Between dealing with the shock of the loss in realtime, the idea that someone would be aware enough to manage to capture things like the monthly Adobe bill (Lightroom Cloud) or Dropbox is unlikely.  If you were to die, one of the first things to be cut off is anything related to a credit or bank card.

Writing all your passwords down is a bad idea - it leads to repetitive use & doesn't update automatically when you're forced to change them.  I highly recommend 1Password as a password manager, mostly because of their 'Emergency Kit' -  https://support.1password.com/emergency-kit/

You install the app on your computers/devices & use it for things like 2FA - 2 factor authentication - and to create secure passwords when needed.  By having the emergency kit printed & with your master password, someone could login & access these items.  So keep it secure, but accessible in the event of your death.  It even includes 1gb of data storage for copies of important documents.
Title: Re: Online Backup Storage.
Post by: Dinarius on December 31, 2020, 06:40:04 am
Interesting thread.

I'm currently trialing Backblaze.

I've tried a dozen speed-tests on my broadband and all, including Backblaze's own, give my upload speed at 25-30Mbps.

But, the Backblaze upload app Performance tab is giving readings of 2-3Mbps for each file uploaded. At that rate, uploading 24/7, it will take over a year to complete. Useless. (My last service - can't remember who they were, but they went bust, a race to the bottom as said above - took just under 3 months for a similar upload.)

Does any service make better use of available bandwidth?

As someone who, with very rare exceptions, only preserves RAW files with their CaptureOne edits intact, I should probably revert to what I use to do and buy a couple of big USB sticks at the end of each year and simply copy. I'm not a very high volume shooter.

Thanks.

D.

Ps. And, yes, the Manual Throttle in the app is set to Max.
Title: Re: Online Backup Storage.
Post by: Rajan Parrikar on January 04, 2021, 12:00:45 pm
Interesting thread.

I'm currently trialing Backblaze.

I've tried a dozen speed-tests on my broadband and all, including Backblaze's own, give my upload speed at 25-30Mbps.

But, the Backblaze upload app Performance tab is giving readings of 2-3Mbps for each file uploaded. At that rate, uploading 24/7, it will take over a year to complete. Useless. (My last service - can't remember who they were, but they went bust, a race to the bottom as said above - took just under 3 months for a similar upload.)

Does any service make better use of available bandwidth?

As someone who, with very rare exceptions, only preserves RAW files with their CaptureOne edits intact, I should probably revert to what I use to do and buy a couple of big USB sticks at the end of each year and simply copy. I'm not a very high volume shooter.

Thanks.

D.

Ps. And, yes, the Manual Throttle in the app is set to Max.

It took me 9 days of continuous operation to upload 6.3 TB on IDrive. The speeds here in Iceland were not an issue, it is the IDrive server that slowed things down.


Title: Re: Online Backup Storage.
Post by: Dinarius on January 04, 2021, 12:20:38 pm
It took me 9 days of continuous operation to upload 6.3 TB on IDrive. The speeds here in Iceland were not an issue, it is the IDrive server that slowed things down.

Thanks.

I wrote to their Support and they told me to increase the thread number in the BB control panel from 1 to 6. I did this and it immediately re-calculated the upload from 368 days (I seem to remember it being) to 46 days.

It's definitely much faster now. But, I wondering if I could increase the thread number more?

I have a similar quantity to your 6Tb, but no way is it going to happen in 9 days - not even close.

Thanks.

D.
Title: Re: Online Backup Storage.
Post by: BobShaw on January 04, 2021, 02:28:41 pm
Time Machine is great, but useless if there's a fire, or my computer gets stolen.
Not necessary. All you need to do is have multiple drives in Time Machine and rotate them each fortnight (or month or whatever is you risk situation.)
I have three 6TB drives and one is connected, one is in the fire proof data rated safe and one is off site. The worst I can lose in most situations is the last two weeks.
In common situations, I would only lose an hour.
I have a 4th backup which is a Drobo that I turn on once a week.

Leaving drives as inheritance only works if the one getting it is as methodical with backup as you are. Otherwise the drive will die eventually.
Prints on paper is the only solution. There are still 4 paper copies of the Magna Carta existing, so paper lasts.
Title: Re: Online Backup Storage.
Post by: Joe Towner on January 11, 2021, 01:08:30 am
Thanks.

I wrote to their Support and they told me to increase the thread number in the BB control panel from 1 to 6. I did this and it immediately re-calculated the upload from 368 days (I seem to remember it being) to 46 days.

It's definitely much faster now. But, I wondering if I could increase the thread number more?

I have a similar quantity to your 6Tb, but no way is it going to happen in 9 days - not even close.

Thanks.

D.

For the purposes of your trial, you want to exclude older data that's backed up elsewhere. Depending on your folder setup, excluding anything that isn't in the last 30 days would be a good start, then start adding things in, going backwards. 2020, 2019, 2018 and it'll eventually get up there.
Title: Re: Online Backup Storage.
Post by: janisepeterson5 on June 08, 2022, 09:19:26 am
Check out this cloud server https://hostman.com/cloud_server/ (https://hostman.com/cloud_server/), it might help. Absolutely reliable and effective. Been using it for a while, itís one of the best for sure.
Title: Re: Online Backup Storage.
Post by: TechTalk on June 26, 2022, 02:53:10 pm
⬆︎ Let's welcome "janisepeterson5" the latest Forum Spammer (https://www.stopforumspam.com/search) to join us ⬆︎
Title: Re: Online Backup Storage.
Post by: Dinarius on June 27, 2022, 03:26:04 am
⬆︎ Let's welcome "janisepeterson5" the latest Forum Spammer (https://www.stopforumspam.com/search) to join us ⬆︎

You're right.

Moderators should remove spam posts like that.

D.