Luminous Landscape Forum

Equipment & Techniques => Cameras, Lenses and Shooting gear => Topic started by: ivanrossi on March 17, 2019, 01:34:43 pm

Title: Best wide angle for architectural lighting
Post by: ivanrossi on March 17, 2019, 01:34:43 pm
Hello,

Recently I'm working for lighting fixtures catalogues and I'm not satisfied of my 24mm ts-e.

As attachment an image that show my problem with high dynamic range images.

I know the 24 ts-e II would be an improvement, but I'm also looking around... What about ACTAR 24?

And would a 7-8000 Rodenstock perform really better?
Title: Re: Best wide angle for architectural lighting
Post by: Balafre on March 17, 2019, 06:04:56 pm
Hi! I own and use the 24 TSE Mk2 and various Zeiss wides and they're blisteringly good, and I don't have such flare issues. Shooting into light is always going to cause some flare potential. Try polarising it too, or using a ladder to give you more height to make the angle of reflection less acute and more obtuse. But various top German optics definitely do flare less because they are designed to. Determine your needs, do your desk research and if quality is important, then invest in your future.
Title: Re: Best wide angle for architectural lighting
Post by: ivanrossi on March 18, 2019, 08:45:17 am
I don't have such flare issues.
Thank you.

So you are saying you don't have flares in a single exposure or with a 6 stops HDR?

I think I'll organize a test shooting with a rental service...
Title: Re: Best wide angle for architectural lighting
Post by: ben730 on March 18, 2019, 01:18:39 pm
Try the:
Rodenstock 23 HR, 28 HR, 32 HR
Nikkor 19 PC
Canon 24 TSE MkII

and use a compendium with all of them.

All these 4 lenses won't disappoint you.
They are all great.
Regards,
Ben
Title: Re: Best wide angle for architectural lighting
Post by: Lightsmith on March 24, 2019, 02:58:16 pm
The problem is with your  technique. Start by adding a dimmer to the power source for the light an adjust the lumens down. Shoot in RAW and then adjust the image to get the best look. Once you have the process down it will be much faster for additional products.

I would also give some thought to having a grey or tan background for the lights depending upon the fixture and whether it is brass, bronze, black, chrome, etc. to provide better color contrast for the product.