Luminous Landscape Forum

Equipment & Techniques => Cameras, Lenses and Shooting gear => Topic started by: deuchar on January 30, 2019, 12:10:39 am

Title: Camera backpack for carryon - flying.
Post by: deuchar on January 30, 2019, 12:10:39 am
Hi folks,
Looking for some advice for an internationally sized carryon backpack to replace my roller as I'm finally getting weighed enough that its an issue. Doesn't have to be max size, does need to hold a 13" MacBook Pro and D850 bodies ungripped. Ideally I could also use the pack for short hikes so a solid harness and back panel would be great. If there is a waist belt it needs to be detachable as my torso is too long for it to have any effect.

Looking at the ThinkTank Airport Essentials (commuter is too unwieldy) and the new Gura Gear Kiboko 2.0 22L. Happy to take any and all suggestions. Understated and black would be a plus for professional settings. The streetwalker 2.0 would probably be perfect if it took a 13" laptop.

Am I missing any gems?
Title: Re: Camera backpack for carryon - flying.
Post by: Slobodan Blagojevic on January 30, 2019, 12:13:50 am
Take into account the new rules for carry-ons: 8kg max
Title: Re: Camera backpack for carryon - flying.
Post by: stever on January 30, 2019, 01:36:42 pm
aside from flexibility in carrying your gear, it's important that it looks small and light.  I've not had trouble so far with wt limits - they won't weigh you unless it looks big and/or heavy.
Title: Re: Camera backpack for carryon - flying.
Post by: hogloff on January 30, 2019, 03:07:10 pm
Take into account the new rules for carry-ons: 8kg max

7kg for internal flights in India and Vietnam...and I had mine weighed.
Title: Re: Camera backpack for carryon - flying.
Post by: phila on January 31, 2019, 07:42:34 pm
I've used Gura Gear backpacks for many years now (I only bought a second after my first was stolen in Italy). Always fitted in overhead bins. Excellent quality.
Title: Re: Camera backpack for carryon - flying.
Post by: Slobodan Blagojevic on January 31, 2019, 08:50:06 pm
... for many years now...Always fitted in overhead bins...

Fitting in overhead bins, unfortunately, is not enough as of March last year. Whether they are going to weigh it or not is a gamble. They did mine.
Title: Re: Camera backpack for carryon - flying.
Post by: Aram Hăvărneanu on January 31, 2019, 08:54:15 pm
They weighted mine too. Eight kilograms is a total joke. Their own regulations tell you not to put your camera equipment in your checked bag. What are you supposed to do then?

They are trying to make people pay for (more) checked bags. I'd gladly pay even more to let them keep my carry on bag! But they don't offer such service (unless you fly business class).
Title: Re: Camera backpack for carryon - flying.
Post by: Matthew W. on February 01, 2019, 02:03:21 am
I love my Gura Gear Kiboko 30L.  It fits in the overhead bins on the small commuter planes like the CRJ's.  I wasn't aware of the 7kg weight limit.  That will definitely be a problem in the future.
Title: Re: Camera backpack for carryon - flying.
Post by: Alaarx on February 01, 2019, 03:13:13 am
How are the Gura Gear bags comfort wise for long days in urban sprawl or 2-3 hour hikes?
Title: Re: Camera backpack for carryon - flying.
Post by: Matthew W. on February 01, 2019, 03:13:07 pm
As camera backpacks go, I find the Gura Gear to be comfortable even for short hikes, but it definitely doesn't have any sort of suspension system like a hiking backpack and the majority of the weight is supported by my shoulders.  So within the limits of a backpack that's primarily designed for holding gear and not necessarily for comfort with heavy gear for extended outings, I find the Gura Gear very nice.
Title: Re: Camera backpack for carryon - flying.
Post by: D Fuller on February 01, 2019, 03:25:40 pm
I have done a lot of traveling with a ThnkTank Streetwalker backpack. https://www.thinktankphoto.com/collections/streetwalker-series
Their stuff is incredibley well-made. They also hae a series called Airport that might be worth looking at, but I really prefer the layout and access of the Streetwalker line.
Title: Re: Camera backpack for carryon - flying.
Post by: bassman51 on February 01, 2019, 04:02:54 pm
I have the Airport Essentials and found it excellent for transport, less so for walking around.  It does have a detachable waist belt, but it’s quite thin, and the straps and back begin to wear on me after a while.  I’m 5’10” fwiw. 

I wouldn’t enjoy carrying it on any sort of real hike.  I have the F-stop Guru which I love for hiking with photo gear, but it might be too small for your kit if you have any long lenses along with the 850. It worked for me with a D7000 and a DX lens kit while traveling.
Title: Re: Camera backpack for carryon - flying.
Post by: Javier S. on February 02, 2019, 07:01:24 pm
As for me the compromise is to get the lighter bag you can that is comfortable enough for you. That´s why I changed time ago to Gura Gear.

That way you´ll carry more photographic equipment for a given weight.

If you´re somehow overload, try to hang it on one shoulder only and act as if it´s really light for the time of your checking so that they don´t pay much attention on it and, of course, have good luck. If you´re still questioned with the weight what I´ve done is to take out the heviest camera with the heviest lens attached and hang it on my neck, as many tourists Will do and then ask them to weight again the bag. They don´t usually like it but there´s no mention about the size of the camera you have hanging on your shoulder.

If even this doesn´t work, ask someone to holt part of your equipment before the check in and have your bag weighed then. Afterwards, if your bag is not too bulky and you don´t give the impression that is heavy, they usually don´t check it again at the embarking gate, but of course is a question of luck. At the gate they´d probably be more permisive, anyway, to not taking your bag to the bag storage of the plane by hand and you can explaine them that it might get somthing braked.

Anyway those regulations are a real pain but so far I just had real problems in Egipt, many years ago, but I was travelling with 17 Kg of underwater photographic equipment and, at the end I managed to go through.


That´s my experience, and I travel long distance 2 to 4 times a year for the past 40+

Good luck
Title: Re: Camera backpack for carryon - flying.
Post by: shadowblade on February 03, 2019, 03:56:25 am
Custom-made military-style jacket (along the lines of the M65 jacket), with four big bellows-style pockets on the front and a game pocket in the back. Also add in lots of extra pockets, both internal and external, for general utility - after all, it's custom-made. You can do much the same thing in a longer trench coat style, although it will be a bit more conspicuous.

You can easily put an A7r3 or A9 body in each of the lower front pockets. Teleconverters can go in the upper pockets, while you can put a 70-200 or 100-400mm lens in the game pocket. Also put your memory cards and spare batteries somewhere in the jacket. Even carrying all this, the jacket shouldn't look too out-of-place - heavily-loaded, for sure, with full pockets, but not looking over-stuffed to the point of being ridiculous. Take it off as soon as you board the plane and stash it in the overhead space.

For the backpack, make sure you get one with a removable camera compartment that can be zipped closed (e.g. Fstop). If the removable compartment doesn't come with a handle, have one attached. When flying, just carry the gear in the removable compartment, like a briefcase - no need to count the extra 1-2kg of backpack towards the weight limit.

Make sure you know the airline rules about 'personal items' and be sure to abuse it - most airlines will let you carry 1-2 items of hand luggage, each weighing 7-10kg (depending on fare class and airline), as well as one 'personal item', which may be a laptop computer, camera or other similar item. For me, that 'personal item' has occasionally been a 500mm f/4 lens...

Filter holders, filters (in a storage case), tripod heads and other heavy, solid metal objects, chargers (without batteries in them), etc. can all go in checked luggage - they may be expensive, but should still come in below the limit for travel insurance.
Title: Re: Camera backpack for carryon - flying.
Post by: Slobodan Blagojevic on February 03, 2019, 09:59:42 am
“Personal item” is now also limited to 4kg, in addition to size limits.
Title: Re: Camera backpack for carryon - flying.
Post by: shadowblade on February 03, 2019, 11:38:59 am
“Personal item” is now also limited to 4kg, in addition to size limits.

Still enough for a supertele lens, especially with the new Canon and Sony models.
Title: Re: Camera backpack for carryon - flying.
Post by: t6b9p on February 03, 2019, 01:24:55 pm
Quote
Take into account the new rules for carry-ons: 8kg max

A bit of a generic response.

Carry-on rules are designated by airline not TSA.

Carry-on weight for international British Airways is and has been 23kg for both carry-on items. I pretty much always used my Gura Gear Kiboko from way back. It's normally stuffed and heavy but never reaches 23kg. Other airlines can have much more restrictive weight restrictions (that's what jackets with big pockets are for). I tend to put the "backpack" straps aways and carry it by handles when checking in and boarding as it reduces the "appearance" of being bulky. I have actually carried a tape measure with me and measured the BA carry-on size "check" bins at checkin. They are slightly smaller than the dimensions stated as allowable. Get a non-roller bag with max dimensions possible for carry-on (this also varies by airline) and get a low profile colour. Note that the bins sizes can vary between aisle seat and window seat even on the same plane. On most BA international flights to the UK, the Kiboko fits easily into the window bin but is a snug fit in the aisle bin.

Smaller planes and puddle jumpers are a problem, size and weight wise.

Although the Kiboko is not really designed for any extended "walks" with lots of gear, it seems to work for me. I have a back problem that occasionally affects me but fortunately putting on a loaded Kiboko actually "fixes" my back.
Title: Re: Camera backpack for carryon - flying.
Post by: heinrichvoelkel on February 03, 2019, 04:16:38 pm
Think Tank Photo Shapeshifter , best backpack for airline travel no matter what
Title: Re: Camera backpack for carryon - flying.
Post by: Slobodan Blagojevic on February 03, 2019, 04:40:37 pm
A bit of a generic response.

Carry-on rules are designated by airline not TSA...

Thanks for that correction. I flew Turkish airline recently and was under impression it was some sort of new international guideline.

Here is the most recent list I could quickly find about different airlines limits:

https://www.skyscanner.net/news/cabin-luggage-guide-hand-baggage-sizes-and-weight-restrictions
Title: Re: Camera backpack for carryon - flying.
Post by: Jim Metzger on February 03, 2019, 06:04:45 pm
I was fortunate to travel to Nepal twice and India in the last year. I took a Peak Design backpack for 2 trips and a Gura Gear Kiboko 30L 1 time. I was way over the weight limit all three times. Flew into 3 different airports for the stop overs; China, Abu Dahbi and Qatar. 3 different airlines. At each check-in I let security know right away I was carrying professional camera equipment. Response varied from "just send it through the-ray" to please open and take out everything. In all cases they thanked me and I was on my way.

Friends had they much smaller bags checked at different times.

Your milage may vary, I believe Security doesn't like when you are trying to pull the wool over their eyes.

Jim
Title: Re: Camera backpack for carryon - flying.
Post by: Aram Hăvărneanu on February 03, 2019, 06:37:33 pm
Security doesn't care if you carry 50 grams or 50 kg, only the airline staff cares, like the check in people.
Title: Re: Camera backpack for carryon - flying.
Post by: budjames on February 04, 2019, 07:28:50 am
I purchased the PeakDesign 20L Everyday back pack for a one month trip to Australia and New Zealand. I love the flexible dividers that let you easily customize the interior of the bag. The shoulder strap design makes that bag comfortable to wear all day.

Regards,
Bud James

Please check out my fine art and travel photography at www.budjames.photography or on Instagram at www.instagram.com/budjamesphoto.
Title: Re: Camera backpack for carryon - flying.
Post by: hogloff on February 04, 2019, 11:30:04 am
Custom-made military-style jacket (along the lines of the M65 jacket), with four big bellows-style pockets on the front and a game pocket in the back. Also add in lots of extra pockets, both internal and external, for general utility - after all, it's custom-made. You can do much the same thing in a longer trench coat style, although it will be a bit more conspicuous.

You can easily put an A7r3 or A9 body in each of the lower front pockets. Teleconverters can go in the upper pockets, while you can put a 70-200 or 100-400mm lens in the game pocket. Also put your memory cards and spare batteries somewhere in the jacket. Even carrying all this, the jacket shouldn't look too out-of-place - heavily-loaded, for sure, with full pockets, but not looking over-stuffed to the point of being ridiculous. Take it off as soon as you board the plane and stash it in the overhead space.


Guy in front of me had to empty out his jacket pockets in Vietnam and weighed along with his carry on. If one tries to circumvent the system...just be prepared to live with the consequences and have your gear checked.
Title: Re: Camera backpack for carryon - flying.
Post by: brandtb on February 05, 2019, 08:32:48 am
Most of the time I use an early model of the f-stop gear Guru with a small pro ICU unit...carrying a Nikon D8** body and a couple of lenses...for domestic/international travel. I can put another body inside above the ICU plus other gear. Has a laptop sleeve and is extremely well organized and is slightly lighter than the GG Kiboko. The orig. was on "short" side and I have long torso so not the best fit - but that's def. not a deal breaker though. I would recommend it easily. The new Guru UL is black only and the details at link Guru UL (https://fstopgear.com/products/packs/guru-ul)
Title: Re: Camera backpack for carryon - flying.
Post by: NancyP on February 21, 2019, 07:04:37 pm
I have yet to encounter the need to weigh carry-on items, but I would object greatly if I had to empty out my coat pockets and put something through checked luggage because of a 1 kg overweight on carry-on luggage. You'd think a 50 kg human would get by with putting 1 kg in a coat pocket. (My neighbors on flights are often 100 kg and up.) Maybe they see me not having any trouble with managing the pack, and just assume it would weigh less than 8 kg.
Title: Re: Camera backpack for carryon - flying.
Post by: armand on March 01, 2019, 02:35:13 pm
Probably the best way is to use an ICU and just place it whatever your carry-on is. I used it in a Patagonia 60L duffel and it worked very well. Can even be carried comfortable enough for quite some distance using the shoulder straps.

I also used the same ICU in a couple of backpacks, a 35L designed mostly for scrambling/climbing and one that I would recommend, an REI Trail 40: https://www.rei.com/product/136586/rei-co-op-trail-40-pack-mens
I carried the REI with around 30 lbs of camera stuff, water/food and some clothing for 4-5 miles of significant hiking and it did very well. The cameras were mostly in an ICU and the advantage of this pack is that it has an U-shaped zipper over the entire length that offers very easy access to the ICU without having to pull it out. With less camera gear (easy to do, I had the kitchen sink) I can see it being good enough for a weekend of backpacking.
The size is within carry-on limits by my assessment.


Another option that I ordered but came too late is this Mammut: https://www.rei.com/product/125250/mammut-trion-pro-50-7-pack-mens
It has the theoretical advantage that the U-shaped zipper is on the shoulder strap side; this combined with the very water resistant material means you can put it down when it's wet without getting your shoulder straps wet. It's also bigger but it might be a tighter fit as a carry-on. I think F-stop and others have similar designs with the zippers but they might not be that practical for hiking/backpacking.
Title: Re: Camera backpack for carryon - flying.
Post by: Slobodan Blagojevic on March 01, 2019, 02:57:11 pm
Probably the best way is to use an ICU...

WTF is ICU?
Title: Re: Camera backpack for carryon - flying.
Post by: Aram Hăvărneanu on March 01, 2019, 03:12:48 pm
Internal camera unit.
Title: Re: Camera backpack for carryon - flying.
Post by: armand on March 01, 2019, 03:33:43 pm
WTF is ICU?

Something like this: (https://static.bhphoto.com/images/multiple_images/images500x500/1541045132000_IMG_1086535.jpg)


I used a zippered one but the above type can save weight if you have easy access to it.
Title: Re: Camera backpack for carryon - flying.
Post by: Lightsmith on March 24, 2019, 03:05:12 pm
I now take two backpacks, one that meets the carry-on luggage regulations and the other that qualifies as a "personal item" and goes under the seat in front of me (Nagano 16L works well as does the old Gura Gear 18L). Different airlines have different carry-on guidelines which is why for international travel to Europe or South America I use American Airlines and would never use United Airline which has been the worst in this respect for more than 30 years of my own business travel.

I will also check for the availability of a premium coach seat as it provides for earlier boarding before the overhead bins are filled up and sometimes provide for more bags.

I have only had my bags weighed on two occasions, a flight from Guam to Truk and a flight from King Salmon to Brooks Camp. If a bag looks heavy and bulky it is more likely to catch the eye of someone at the gate as with a Pelican type hard case.

The under the seat space that is available is hardly ever what the airline restrictions would lead one to believe. Center seats usually, but not always, have the most space, and the aisle seat will have the least amount of space for a "personal item" bag.
Title: Re: Camera backpack for carryon - flying.
Post by: DaveL on April 30, 2019, 03:48:04 pm
I have done a lot of traveling with a ThnkTank Streetwalker backpack. https://www.thinktankphoto.com/collections/streetwalker-series
Their stuff is incredibley well-made. They also hae a series called Airport that might be worth looking at, but I really prefer the layout and access of the Streetwalker line.

I bought version 1 of the Streetwalker pack some time ago.
I don't use it now.
I should--BUT--how do you carry an ipad in this pack safely? I can't figure it out.

The new versions of the bag are much more expensive than my small pack.
Title: Re: Camera backpack for carryon - flying.
Post by: hogloff on April 30, 2019, 07:42:04 pm
I have yet to encounter the need to weigh carry-on items, but I would object greatly if I had to empty out my coat pockets and put something through checked luggage because of a 1 kg overweight on carry-on luggage. You'd think a 50 kg human would get by with putting 1 kg in a coat pocket. (My neighbors on flights are often 100 kg and up.) Maybe they see me not having any trouble with managing the pack, and just assume it would weigh less than 8 kg.

You can object greatly...but in the end you'll probably be forced to check in some of your carry on. Will you be prepared to do so? I've seen enough regulations in foreign countries to plan ahead rather than object greatly as your plane leaves.
Title: Re: Camera backpack for carryon - flying.
Post by: NancyP on April 30, 2019, 08:34:51 pm
Yes, I know. Part of it is the joy of sticking it to the Americans, even those who wear buttons "Don't blame me, I didn't vote for the SOB". We Americans are the frenemies of the rest-of-world - ROW has plenty of people who would like to live in the USA, and these same people rightly intuit that the stereotypical Ugly US Americans comprise a significant percentage of all tourist US Americans.

I just tend to get a bit frosted when my 120 kg 1.7 m tall neighbor in Economy billows over to my space barely adequate for 50 kg 1.7 m tall self.
Title: Re: Camera backpack for carryon - flying.
Post by: armand on April 30, 2019, 09:19:13 pm
...
 If a bag looks heavy and bulky it is more likely to catch the eye of someone at the gate as with a Pelican type hard case.
...

That's why when I bring a "personal" item that contains cameras, usually my old Kata backpack, I always make a point in carrying it through the ticketing just by one strap and showing no effort, to make it look lighter than it is. With a camera or two and several lenses and a laptop/iPad it frequently goes over the weight limit even if by space it's just fine.
Title: Re: Camera backpack for carryon - flying.
Post by: D Fuller on April 30, 2019, 09:28:34 pm
I bought version 1 of the Streetwalker pack some time ago.
I don't use it now.
I should--BUT--how do you carry an ipad in this pack safely? I can't figure it out.

The new versions of the bag are much more expensive than my small pack.

Mine has a zippered slit between the padding doe your back and the camera compartment that will accommodate a laptop and/or iPad. I carried a 17” MacBook Pro there when I still had one. Now I carry a 15” or an iPad or both, depending on the shoot.
Title: Re: Camera backpack for carryon - flying.
Post by: hollywoodstills on June 01, 2019, 12:31:08 pm
This is great question and lots of great responses.  Like most, I've had dozens of bags.  Cinebags, Thinktank, Tenba, and PD and Lowepro. 

After something like a million miles, carrying any bag around international airports with medium format cameras and lenses just plain sucks.  So here's what works for me.  I fly almost exclusively on Delta, except intra-asia and have never had a problem.  Delta allows 1 carry-on and 1 "personal bag" for me, that's a camera bag.   

I have a spinner Briggs and Reilly as my change of clothing/coat/laptop bag.  It also carries a lot of my batteries/charger and hard bulky stuff.  On top of that is my Peak Design 30L.  I bought it from REI because you support a good organization and get rewards in the form of dividends back. 

In it is some Samsung t5 SSD's (and now sandisk ssd) in a tiny pelican, 4 lenses with the largest being the 240mm, and the Phase XF/back, etc.  Sometimes on the bottom of the bag I put a Mavic Pro.  I also have a small bag of cleaning clothes, color chart, a headlamp, and few other tools and things.  I also have an Osprey waterproof raincover.  Maybe they PD came with a raincover, but I can't find it, and this thing works and is good for setting it down anywhere and having a place to work from. 

Now there's three nice features about this PD that I want to say.  One, their inner-bag dividers stick.  They don't go anywhere.  Not that they could because it's so packed, but if it wasn't, it wouldn't.  Secondly the top handle.  You know how some backpacks you really have to stretch to go over the rolling bag, not this one.  It's really good.  Secure but not too snug.  Lastly the dividers aren't super padded, which take up all the room in a bag.  That's really annoying when traveling, and why Cinebags are terrible (they protect stuff, but lose all their room). 

And the spinner bag on the bottom has changed my life.  I can travel with a coffee or my phone happily for miles through airports.  No more broken wrist.  I can run terminal to terminal.  The briggs also expands or can be crunched down using these things on the side, so I take my laptop out and put in overhead even on small domestic commuter flights. 

The PD 30L fits in every single overhead (a little issue if you try to stuff laptop also in there) but with medium format, I think it's the best I've found. 

The other bag that I recently found that may be of use to someone here is the Mindshift Photocross 13.  While i'm not a fan of across the chest situations, it's fairly comfortable when used with waistbelt, I can put the XF with a lens and another lens (including the 240mm) in it.  WITH my 13" macbook pro.  It's heavy, but super compact where the PD isn't.  And it pretty much goes flat and has waterproof zippers and a little sidepocket for a reusable water bottle.

So now, I pack the Mindshift in my main luggage from REI (a "hardcase" spinner...see the trend...airport  checkin with two spinners is the best) and if I just want one lens or just the drone, I can tackle anything and not be lugging around a 30L backpack with one piece of gear. 

I do miss Lowepro and their bag in a bag thing - the roller bag turned backpack.  That's awesome.  Bulky, and heavy, but awesome.  I think Tenba had one (I also bought). 
Title: Re: Camera backpack for carryon - flying.
Post by: hollywoodstills on June 01, 2019, 12:36:50 pm
You can object greatly...but in the end you'll probably be forced to check in some of your carry on. Will you be prepared to do so? I've seen enough regulations in foreign countries to plan ahead rather than object greatly as your plane leaves.

One reason to have a more secure spinner underneath the backpack, it looks super easy and effortless.  Never in a million miles have I had to weigh my carry ons (knock on wood), and if so, I have a small lightweight REI 20L stuff sac bag that I happily through my batteries and things in and throw it in overhead. 

The only caveat is that I believe in London, even in transit, you can only have ONE bag.  Haven't transited through London in while, but I believe that was the case. 
Title: Re: Camera backpack for carryon - flying.
Post by: Lightsmith on June 01, 2019, 02:14:14 pm
I have only been weighed twice, once for a flight from Guam to Palau and once for a flight from Katmai to Brooks Camp, and both times in small planes. But I make an effort to minimize the apparent bulk of my carry on items.

Airline personnel usually ignore a shopping bag like those used at the duty free shops and the airline guidelines allow a small laptop or tablet in a sleeve as well as a "personal item" and a piece of carry-on luggage. I realized after hauling a 37 lb. Gura Gear Bataflae 32L backpack on a trip that I needed to divide my gear into two backpacks. So now I use the Bataflae 26L along with the Bataflae 18L backpacks. The 18L qualifies as a personal item as it will fit under the seat in front of me. An alternative to the 18L is the Nagano 16L backpack that qualifies and the backpack itself is quite light at 3.1 lb.

When not able to go on an airline where I have frequent flyer status for early boarding I will pay for a premium coach seat that provides this same benefit. Big difference between being one of the first to board and being one of the last in terms of available space in the overhead bins.

The Bataflae bags have carry handles and the shoulder straps and waist belt can be zippered into a pocket which makes for a slimmer profile and makes the bag much easier to carry through the narrow aisle of an aircraft. The Think Tank Airport Commuter is probably what I would buy today although with an interior length of 16 inches it is too small for a 600mm f/4 lens.

I use a $25 Samsonite folding cart to wheel my backpacks through the airports and it fits on top of my backpack in the overhead bin.
Title: Re: Camera backpack for carryon - flying.
Post by: chez on June 01, 2019, 07:53:48 pm
Yes, I know. Part of it is the joy of sticking it to the Americans, even those who wear buttons "Don't blame me, I didn't vote for the SOB". We Americans are the frenemies of the rest-of-world - ROW has plenty of people who would like to live in the USA, and these same people rightly intuit that the stereotypical Ugly US Americans comprise a significant percentage of all tourist US Americans.

I just tend to get a bit frosted when my 120 kg 1.7 m tall neighbor in Economy billows over to my space barely adequate for 50 kg 1.7 m tall self.

I seem to have gotten lost how a carryon limit is "sticking it to the Americans". The limit applies to everyone one...not just Americans. Seems like you have an axe to grind some where's deep.
Title: Re: Camera backpack for carryon - flying.
Post by: TommyWeir on June 02, 2019, 03:14:27 am
Can highly recommend the Tenba Shootout 24L backpack.  Very comfortable, good smart design too.  Works within guidelines for carry-on.

https://www.tenba.com/en/collections/shootout
Title: Re: Camera backpack for carryon - flying.
Post by: Slobodan Blagojevic on June 02, 2019, 10:00:47 am
Can highly recommend the Tenba Shootout 24L backpack.  Very comfortable, good smart design too.  Works within guidelines for carry-on.

It used to be that dimensions alone determined the guidelines. Not any more. Weight is added and can be very limiting, depending on the airline and type of ticket. Whether you could charm the attendant by your disarming smile, or pretend that it isn’t heavy, is a gamble. I do not fly frequently, but of my four recent international flights, it had to be weighed three times.
Title: Re: Camera backpack for carryon - flying.
Post by: TommyWeir on June 02, 2019, 11:14:03 am
Indeed weight has become an issue.  The bag itself being relatively light to the kit inside it of course... the decision on what to pack is really the key factor.   Have only had cabin baggage weighed once, by Ryanair in France, they weighed every bag for every one, not a hope of making it look light.   

Another incident, I remembered I had a small hunting knife in my jacket pocket in Nice, I remembered this at check-in, popped it in my check-in bag before handing it over.   I turned around with my boarding card to see an armed soldier right behind me.  He followed me all the way to the gate, an hour and a half later.  Not the most relaxing time I've had at an airport.