Luminous Landscape Forum

Raw & Post Processing, Printing => Printing: Printers, Papers and Inks => Topic started by: LimbicSystemPhotoworks on October 11, 2018, 10:25:52 AM

Title: Printing on Glass Using the Canon Pro-1000
Post by: LimbicSystemPhotoworks on October 11, 2018, 10:25:52 AM
Has anyone here had any experience in printing on glass using the Pro-1000?
Title: Re: Printing on Glass Using the Canon Pro-1000
Post by: Mark D Segal on October 11, 2018, 10:29:53 AM
Unless the glass bends like paper this is not possible because the printer does not have a flat pass-through feed for rigid media. The nearest neighbour would be an Epson P800, provided the thickness of the glass fits within the specs for that feed.
Title: Re: Printing on Glass Using the Canon Pro-1000
Post by: LimbicSystemPhotoworks on October 11, 2018, 10:38:56 AM
Unless the glass bends like paper this is not possible because the printer does not have a flat pass-through feed for rigid media. The nearest neighbour would be an Epson P800, provided the thickness of the glass fits within the specs for that feed.
Thanks, Mark. I wasn't sure about that.
Title: Re: Printing on Glass Using the Canon Pro-1000
Post by: Dan Berg on October 11, 2018, 10:39:36 AM
We do dye sublimation to glass panels but definitely not what you asked for.
Worth a look, they are stunning.
Title: Re: Printing on Glass Using the Canon Pro-1000
Post by: LimbicSystemPhotoworks on October 11, 2018, 10:42:31 AM
We do dye sublimation to glass panels but definitely not what you asked for.
Worth a look, they are stunning.

Thanks, Dan, I will take a look. I am wanting to do metal leaf backing on prints to glass, and I like to do my own printing, but I'm open to alternatives.
Title: Re: Printing on Glass Using the Canon Pro-1000
Post by: enduser on October 11, 2018, 07:25:50 PM
The original ipf6100 Canon had a straight thru option and we did a few prints on timber veneer. With that Canon you could bump up ech color in the driver - the results were quite good. Current Canons don't have this feed option.
I think the thickness max was just under 1mm.
Title: Re: Printing on Glass Using the Canon Pro-1000
Post by: LimbicSystemPhotoworks on October 12, 2018, 12:45:32 AM
The original ipf6100 Canon had a straight thru option and we did a few prints on timber veneer. With that Canon you could bump up ech color in the driver - the results were quite good. Current Canons don't have this feed option.
I think the thickness max was just under 1mm.

Canon informed me today that NONE of their printers will print on glass.
Title: Re: Printing on Glass Using the Canon Pro-1000
Post by: bteifeld on October 12, 2018, 05:28:30 AM
The IPF6400/6450  has a straight paper path and can print on materials up to 1.5mm/.059 inches thick.

Canon's answer regarding printability is correct for untreated raw glass. If you coat it with a proper aqueous inkjet ink receptor coating(such as inkaid), the glass becomes printable. You would then need to use a solvent-based protective lacquer on the printed side to seal/protect the image. A thermal or pressure-sensitive uv protective clear laminate film might also be an alternative.
Title: Re: Printing on Glass Using the Canon Pro-1000
Post by: LimbicSystemPhotoworks on October 12, 2018, 11:40:12 PM
The IPF6400/6450  has a straight paper path and can print on materials up to 1.5mm/.059 inches thick.

Canon's answer regarding printability is correct for untreated raw glass. If you coat it with a proper aqueous inkjet ink receptor coating(such as inkaid), the glass becomes printable. You would then need to use a solvent-based protective lacquer on the printed side to seal/protect the image. A thermal or pressure-sensitive uv protective clear laminate film might also be an alternative.

I see. So there is hope...! I posed the same question to Epson yesterday regarding the 3880 and also received a negative response. The 3880 also has a straight paper path, but I've had difficulty finding the specs on the size limitations for it.
Title: Re: Printing on Glass Using the Canon Pro-1000
Post by: Dan Berg on October 13, 2018, 06:06:31 AM
The queen of alternative printing goes to Bonnie Lhotka.
Book, dvd and workshops.
Demonstrates the craft of photo emulsion image transfer to wood and glass.
You print your image on the emulsion film then transfer it to the substrate of your choice.
A very crafty look you may like, not hi resolution by any means.
If you want hi-res then you have my first suggestion.
Title: Re: Printing on Glass Using the Canon Pro-1000
Post by: stcstc31 on October 13, 2018, 07:38:07 AM
none of the epsons will do it either, as they only allow 1.5mm thickness media. i am not aware of sheet glass thin enough


you would be better printing on UV flatbed printer, although there will be less shadow detail for example
Title: Re: Printing on Glass Using the Canon Pro-1000
Post by: Mark D Segal on October 13, 2018, 09:27:26 AM
If the glass is no thicker than Breathing Color's Allure (aluminium sheet) it will pass through an Epson P800; I tested it - see my article on this website. I believe (not certain)  maximum media thickness is the same between the P800 and the 3880.
Title: Re: Printing on Glass Using the Canon Pro-1000
Post by: LimbicSystemPhotoworks on October 13, 2018, 09:55:24 PM
If the glass is no thicker than Breathing Color's Allure (aluminium sheet) it will pass through an Epson P800; I tested it - see my article on this website. I believe (not certain)  maximum media thickness is the same between the P800 and the 3880.

Thanks for the heads-up on your article. I believe the 3880 will accommodate substrate up to 1.5 mm. The BC Allure at 0.045" is slightly thinner than that at 1.143 mm. I have a source for optical glass that comes in at 1.2 mm so it should work, assuming the rollers treat the glass gently. It will require applying a coating layer to receive the ink, however. I'm going to try using a glass coating rod, but I'm not sure whether I should go with the Inkaid that bteifeld mentioned or the DASS Universal Precoat II that Bonnie Lhotka makes. I'll probably try both to see which is superior.