Luminous Landscape Forum

Raw & Post Processing, Printing => Printing: Printers, Papers and Inks => Topic started by: Eric Brody on March 24, 2018, 12:14:06 PM

Title: Do I want a 24 inch printer?
Post by: Eric Brody on March 24, 2018, 12:14:06 PM
I'm an retired bum who loves photography and has been doing it in varying levels of intensity for over 50 years. Now, it's all I do, almost every day. I do some traveling in the US and internationally, but mostly stay at home in the beautiful Pacific Northwest. There is lots to photograph within a few hundred miles of my home.

I recently purchased a Sony A7RIII and have enjoyed it and its impressive resolution. I have used the Epson 38xx series of printers since 2007 and now use a 3880. It has been almost totally problem free. My largest prints currently are 13x20 in 22x28 frames. I occasionally, but quite infrequently actually sell an image but not so that I make any significant money. I'd like to try some larger prints, eg 24x36. Locally they cost in the US$150 range each.

My questions are for those who own a 24 inch printer for personal use.

Which printer did you choose and why? Epson-Canon?
What do you do with the large prints?
Do you frame them, is it not quite expensive?
Have you had to buy a new home to have place to display them ;D? I am fortunate to have a home with picture molding so my framed prints hang easily on wires from the molding without putting holes in the wall.
Have you come up with a way to display them effectively without framing?
Assuming I were to purchase an Epson P7000, and have read Keith Cooper's excellent review, (http://www.northlight-images.co.uk/epson-surecolor-p7000-printer-review/#conclusions) have you found it to be worthwhile? Do you often make prints on letter size paper and is it a hassle?

Any comments would be most welcome. I'm in the early thought processing place with this idea. I'd consider the equivalent Canon printer but like to use QTR for my black and white images and according to a recent reply from Roy Harrington himself, QTR will not be coming to Canon. Also I heard/read that the Canon's work only with roll paper.
Title: Re: Do I want a 24 inch printer?
Post by: Mark D Segal on March 24, 2018, 12:40:19 PM
Eric,

I did a review of the Canon Pro-2000 on this website just in case that would be of any help to you. So did Keith Cooper - he focuses a lot more on the features and working of the machines than I do, while I focus a lot more on output. Between the two reviews you get a balanced and reasonably comprehensive picture. I don't own either the Canon or Epson 24 inch models as I have no room for them and no need for the carriage width, so I can't be any help on most of your specific questions. An additional comment I would make is that depending on the paper used in that printer, black shading appearance can be excellent, just using the Canon driver or Canon's printing utility Print Studio Pro that comes bundled with it. Finally, I should mention that I use an Epson SC-P5000 - same printhead and inkset as the SC-P7000, and find the gamut and print quality stunning, whether colour or B&W; so two great choices in terms of how they can print. Perhaps the important decision variables for you would be availability of service in case of need, and which printer's paper feed options best suit your requirements.
Title: Re: Do I want a 24 inch printer?
Post by: JeanMichel on March 24, 2018, 04:17:09 PM
I'm an retired bum who loves photography and has been doing it in varying levels of intensity for over 50 years. Now, it's all I do, almost every day. I do some traveling in the US and internationally, but mostly stay at home in the beautiful Pacific Northwest. There is lots to photograph within a few hundred miles of my home.

I recently purchased a Sony A7RIII and have enjoyed it and its impressive resolution. I have used the Epson 38xx series of printers since 2007 and now use a 3880. It has been almost totally problem free. My largest prints currently are 13x20 in 22x28 frames. I occasionally, but quite infrequently actually sell an image but not so that I make any significant money. I'd like to try some larger prints, eg 24x36. Locally they cost in the US$150 range each.

My questions are for those who own a 24 inch printer for personal use.

Which printer did you choose and why? Epson-Canon?
What do you do with the large prints?
Do you frame them, is it not quite expensive?
Have you had to buy a new home to have place to display them ;D? I am fortunate to have a home with picture molding so my framed prints hang easily on wires from the molding without putting holes in the wall.
Have you come up with a way to display them effectively without framing?
Assuming I were to purchase an Epson P7000, and have read Keith Cooper's excellent review, (http://www.northlight-images.co.uk/epson-surecolor-p7000-printer-review/#conclusions) have you found it to be worthwhile? Do you often make prints on letter size paper and is it a hassle?

Any comments would be most welcome. I'm in the early thought processing place with this idea. I'd consider the equivalent Canon printer but like to use QTR for my black and white images and according to a recent reply from Roy Harrington himself, QTR will not be coming to Canon. Also I heard/read that the Canon's work only with roll paper.


Hi,
I am perhaps in a similar situation. I still do some professional work –mostly documenting art exhibitions and designing art catalogues or books – but am trying to let most clients go. And, i am  focussing much more on my own work.

 I have both an Epson P800 and and Epson P6000 I use the P800 daily, the P6000 much less frequently.

I have a design studio and gallery in my home, all my equipment fits in just nicely in the design area, about 12 feet by 16 feet.

I purchased the P6000 to replace a defunct 7890. The price of the new printer was about the same as the quoted cost for repairing the old machine. Since I am familiar with Epson stuff, I never really looked at the Canon.

On the P6000, I print mostly on Canson Baryta Photograpique rolls, and occasionally on Epson canvas. I am very happy with the results.
Printing on cut sheets is not a problem but not as convenient as using  my P800. 13 by 19 is the smallest sheet I use there, although I tried printing on letter size and it works but it seems silly to use the P6000 for that.

You write that you would like to print up to 24 by 36. While you can print put to 24 inches wide on the P6000, I keep my images to 20 inches wide, leaving 2 inch margins. To bring larger I would want a 44 inch printer. For canvas, I can print an image to 20 inches wide plus a 2 inch mirror edge, allowing for a 20 inch face  and enough mirror edges for stretching on 3/4" stretcher bars.

I can comfortably cut mats and frame in-house for up to 18 by 24 frames, larger than that and I go to a trusted framer. I pretty much insist on ArtGlass, so that gets a bit costly.

For smaller canvas works I use the GoFrame kits. They make the stretching easy and even, but you definitely need to staple the canvas as the double sided tape provided is not likely to maintain the canvas in place for a long time. But it is a quick and easy way to have a 'finished' piece.

I have a home gallery and can display my work there, but, still, there is only so much wall space. I use wire hanging system from AS Hanging System. I have a separate room to store all my unsold stuff!

I always printed m own work – darkroom or digital – so I am not comfortable with letting someone else print my work, although that is a bit silly since all my catalogues and books are printed by various ,printers from different parts of the country, and many artists bring me their files to print! It may make more sense to stay with a smaller printer such as your 3800 or my P800, and get to know someone competent to print your larger images, it really ought not to matter where a particular machine and paper or canvas are as long as you can provide a proper file for it.

Lastly, I think that for photography the P6000 is all you need instead of the P7000. an I I noted, I have no clue about any Canon printer.

Hope that helps a bit

Jean-Michel


Title: Re: Do I want a 24 inch printer?
Post by: enduser on March 24, 2018, 08:00:45 PM
I started with a 17" roll printer and quickly regretted it.  A 24" machine can print smaller but a 17" will not print bigger.  I know that sounds facile, and you could say that my argument doesn't stop at 24", why not 60"?  Well space and cost are the tipping costs for me. 24 felt like the optimum.
Title: Re: Do I want a 24 inch printer?
Post by: stockjock on March 25, 2018, 12:05:42 AM
I have been happily printing on a Canon iPF8400 for over 3 years.  It has completely replaced the printing I used to do on the 3880.  I wanted to lower my printing costs and have the option to use roll paper and occasionally print big.  I had the space for a big printer and the incremental cost of the printer wasn't that important to me.  Psychologically I am a penny wise pound foolish kind of guy so reducing the ink costs due to the large capacity cartridges more than offset that capital investment in my mind.  I also wanted to retain control of the printing for the images that I did print large for either my home or the shows I have been in.  With that background let me give you a few pros and cons.  I haven't kept up with the specifics the differences between the current models from Canon and Epson so I can't help there.

1)  Almost all of my printing is on 17x22" paper, either cut sheets or rolls.  That is large enough to be very satisfying but small enough to be easily stored and archival storage boxes can be had for about $16-30.  Anything larger than 17x22 becomes very challenging from a storage issue.  95% of my printing doesn't require a 24" or larger printer.

2) Roll paper is usually cheaper and obviously more flexible (panoramas and larger prints are easy) and having a built in cutter and vacuum is a significant advantage of the bigger printers. 

3) All roll paper has a curl and some papers never fully uncurl no matter how long you keep the flat. 

4) The biggest downside I've found with the Canon iPF8400 is that it requires you to manually feed cut sheets.  Lately, I have been printing and binding my own photo books.  Printing on roll paper doesn't work for a variety of reasons and manually feeding sheets would be much too time consuming.  I've bought a Canon Pixma Pro-100 that I am dedicating to that task and I am going to experiment with refilling the inks in order to bring the printing cost way down.  That works for this application since I don't care about longevity.  So yes, making smaller prints is a hassle on my iPF8400 but perhaps the Epson printers are better?

5) You will find different opinions about which printer is less likely to clog and you should take the various user reports into account.  I print every three days on the iPF8400 in order to minimize that problem.  You might want to establish a similar routine. 

6) I love having a 44" printer because it gives me the option to go really big but truthfully I have never "needed" to print bigger than 24" wide.  I was able to justify the higher cost when I bought my printer because it came with enough additional ink to offset the price difference with the 24" printer.  I don't know if that is true of either the Canon or Epson printers now.

7) I don't glaze the prints I display in my home.  I've never seen any fading on my photos but if I did I would simply replace them.  And I buy very cheap frames from Micheals.  They look perfectly fine on my walls and even 24x36" prints look great unmounted and unglazed and the total cost to me is less than $30 for the frame, paper, and ink.  Prints I have sent off for exhibitions have been professionally framed at 10x the price! 

Wall space is always an issue but I have solved that by displaying a grid of photos on my larger walls.  That might not be to your taste but I like it.

And if you don't want to frame the prints then the best way I have found to display them is to mount them to self-adhesive Gatorboard.

I hope that helps with some of your questions.

Paul

Title: Re: Do I want a 24 inch printer?
Post by: mearussi on March 25, 2018, 01:05:56 AM
We all have our own way of doing things. I started with Costco before owning any printer and they do very good work for the price. If you have one near you and you don't do a lot of large printing then you might prefer to go that route, as their 24" prints are very economical. The one near me uses the Epson 7880. The main drawback is that you're limited to luster paper. 

The other reason, besides cost, for owning your own printer is because you actually like to print. This is my reason, plus I like both the instant feedback and having total control over my image as well as being able to choose a wide variety of papers.

I started out with two Epson 4800s (one matte, one glossy) which I bought used and they worked well for many years until I bought a 7800 and decided I no longer needed them. This I now regret as I miss the convenience of being able to load a stack of cards into the paper tray and just push print then come back in an hour and have them all done. With the 7800 I have to feed them one at a time into the printer which means I'm tied up until the job is done.

So the questions you have to ask yourself are:
1. do you like to print
2. how often do you need to print 24"
3. for your 24" volume is it worth the overhead expense of both the printer and ink maintenance cost 
4. how important is it to have both total and fast control over your printing

Title: Re: Do I want a 24 inch printer?
Post by: Miles on March 25, 2018, 11:25:12 AM
Like enduser, I started at 17" and quickly decided I wanted to go larger and have been at 44" for several years now.  Here's my thoughts:

1.  Your cost per print will be higher than you think due to several factors including learning curve, wasted ink and paper and trying new media.
2.  Occasional printing costs money in wasted ink for cleanings, clogged heads, or under utilized heads that may need to be replaced early.
3.  If you have an interest in printing canvas gallery wraps, don't forget about needing adequate print width for the wrap. 
4.  You will fill your house quickly and still want to print your new stuff.   :)
5.  My customers require less and less paper prints and have shifted to canvas.
6.  44" printers only cost marginally more than 24" printers (given you have the space).
7.  A good calibrated monitor will save you time and frustration with the final print.

Which printer did you choose and why? Epson-Canon?
I started with Epson, but infrequent usage resulted in repeated head clogs (they are probably much better now).  Owned an HP z3100 and found it to be a great machine.  Have since owned a Canon ipf8300 and now an ipf8400, both of which I have been very satisfied with.  All three manufacturers will give great looking prints.

What do you do with the large prints?
Hang in house for my use, sell, or print for others.

Do you frame them, is it not quite expensive?
Framing is very expensive, thus one of the reasons for the shift to canvas gallery wraps.

Do you often make prints on letter size paper and is it a hassle?
I find letter size to be a hassle on a large printer.  I will use a 10" roll instead and cut down the final print or print on a smaller 13" desktop printer.

Any comments would be most welcome. I'm in the early thought processing place with this idea. I'd consider the equivalent Canon printer but like to use QTR for my black and white images and according to a recent reply from Roy Harrington himself, QTR will not be coming to Canon. Also I heard/read that the Canon's work only with roll paper.
I can't speak for QTR or how important it is to you.  Perhaps you should have someone with a Canon print a b&w for you for evaluation.  My Canon handles cut sheet with ease and I use it regularly, but I don't own the latest model. 

Bottom line is you will have control over your prints, but multiple prints may be necessary to perfect your vision of how you want it to look.

Miles

Title: Re: Do I want a 24 inch printer?
Post by: PeterAit on March 25, 2018, 03:22:53 PM
I'm an retired bum who loves photography and has been doing it in varying levels of intensity for over 50 years. Now, it's all I do, almost every day. I do some traveling in the US and internationally, but mostly stay at home in the beautiful Pacific Northwest. There is lots to photograph within a few hundred miles of my home.

I recently purchased a Sony A7RIII and have enjoyed it and its impressive resolution. I have used the Epson 38xx series of printers since 2007 and now use a 3880. It has been almost totally problem free. My largest prints currently are 13x20 in 22x28 frames. I occasionally, but quite infrequently actually sell an image but not so that I make any significant money. I'd like to try some larger prints, eg 24x36. Locally they cost in the US$150 range each.

My questions are for those who own a 24 inch printer for personal use.

Which printer did you choose and why? Epson-Canon?
What do you do with the large prints?
Do you frame them, is it not quite expensive?
Have you had to buy a new home to have place to display them ;D? I am fortunate to have a home with picture molding so my framed prints hang easily on wires from the molding without putting holes in the wall.
Have you come up with a way to display them effectively without framing?
Assuming I were to purchase an Epson P7000, and have read Keith Cooper's excellent review, (http://www.northlight-images.co.uk/epson-surecolor-p7000-printer-review/#conclusions) have you found it to be worthwhile? Do you often make prints on letter size paper and is it a hassle?

Any comments would be most welcome. I'm in the early thought processing place with this idea. I'd consider the equivalent Canon printer but like to use QTR for my black and white images and according to a recent reply from Roy Harrington himself, QTR will not be coming to Canon. Also I heard/read that the Canon's work only with roll paper.

1)   I have had an Epson 7900 for about 5 years. I chose it because I was moving up from a 4880 that had worked reliably and produced great prints for 5 years before that.
2)   I have a small “gallery” in the entrance hall of my home, with hanging rails, and I rotate new work thru there for friends and visitors to see. I also have  local shows once in a while, where I sell a print or two.
3)   Framing done by a shop is expensive indeed. Do it yourself, much less so. I keep a stock of metal channel frames and glass/acrylic and rotate prints. I also cut my own mats. Canvas stretching is cheaper.
4)   New home? Lord no!
5)   Google “poster hangers”.

Getting a 24” printer is no small deal. It is delivered by truck on a pallet, not UPS, and you’ll need some pals or hired guys to bring it into your house.
Title: Re: Do I want a 24 inch printer?
Post by: vjbelle on March 25, 2018, 04:50:20 PM
I would recommend that you go ahead and buy a 24 inch printer.  You have some wall space, have the time and appreciate the printing experience.  Whether you purchase an Epson or Canon is another issue.  They both can produce extremely good prints.  I have owned both and have learned a lot from that experience.  When the Epson's clog to the point of no self correction it requires a service call.  That's fine if the printer is under warranty but if not then beware.  Either way you may or may not find that the technician hasn't a clue as to what is wrong and will just throw anything necessary at the problem until its fixed.  That's the real problem if you don't have a warranty.  It becomes very costly and you still have a used printer with other issues on the horizon.  Canon approaches this differently with replaceable heads which is a very easy process.  I own a Canon ipf8400 and it replaced an Epson 9900 which I just junked after the heads clogged beyond self fixing.  There are times when I don't print for 6 months and then I print in spurts - only for myself.  The Canon's are better suited for this scenario.  I have a large home with wall space dedicated for prints.  I also use the AS hanging system as mentioned above which is a marvelous way to display prints.  Regardless, you won't be disappointed with either printer - until there is a clog!

Best of luck......

Victor
Title: Re: Do I want a 24 inch printer?
Post by: loganross on March 25, 2018, 05:17:39 PM
I recently had to pick between the two sizes. I ended up staying with 17" (Pro 1000 Canon). From an economic standpoint, the 24" printer (Pro 2000) made sense because of the larger ink cartridges. However, in the end, I decided it would be rare that I print larger than 17" wide,  I generally prefer to work with cut sheets over rolls, and the 24" printer was clearly designed with rolls in mind. Thus, as a practical matter, it was easier for me to stick with the 17" printer.
Title: Re: Do I want a 24 inch printer?
Post by: loganross on March 25, 2018, 05:18:56 PM
I started a thread here on this forum comparing my experience between the Epson P800 and Canon Pro 1000.  It may be useful to you when considering factors between the two companies.

I recently had to pick between the two sizes. I ended up staying with 17" (Pro 1000 Canon). From an economic standpoint, the 24" printer (Pro 2000) made sense because of the larger ink cartridges. However, in the end, I decided it would be rare that I print larger than 17" wide,  I generally prefer to work with cut sheets over rolls, and the 24" printer was clearly designed with rolls in mind. Thus, as a practical matter, it was easier for me to stick with the 17" printer.
Title: Re: Do I want a 24 inch printer?
Post by: gchappel on March 25, 2018, 09:12:48 PM
I am an almost retired old bum- and I would definately go for it.
My wife wanted me to enter some local gallery shows- but I wanted to be in control of my own printing process.  I had used a 3880 for years- but wanted something bigger.
So we made a deal, and I went with the ipf8400 about 2.5 years ago.
Best thing I have done in a long time. 
Yes it is big.  Yes it is expensive.  Yes, there is no way I can justify it.  Nope, none.
It has been a blast.
It forced me to be a better photographer.
It forced me to be more careful. 
It forced me to get better at post processing.
It allowed me to enjoy my prints more.
It cost about the same as a camera body- but improved my work more than any camera ever could.
At least in my experience I would go for it.
I rarely print over 24"- but when I want to go bigger the larger printer is terrific. 
I only print occasionally.  I have had to replace one head, but others than that it has been smooth. 
Gary
Title: Re: Do I want a 24 inch printer?
Post by: MHMG on March 25, 2018, 09:55:44 PM
I am an almost retired old bum- and I would definately go for it.
My wife wanted me to enter some local gallery shows- but I wanted to be in control of my own printing process.  I had used a 3880 for years- but wanted something bigger.
So we made a deal, and I went with the ipf8400 about 2.5 years ago.
Best thing I have done in a long time. 
Yes it is big.  Yes it is expensive.  Yes, there is no way I can justify it.  Nope, none.
It has been a blast.
It forced me to be a better photographer.
It forced me to be more careful. 
It forced me to get better at post processing.
It allowed me to enjoy my prints more.
It cost about the same as a camera body- but improved my work more than any camera ever could.
At least in my experience I would go for it.
I rarely print over 24"- but when I want to go bigger the larger printer is terrific. 
I only print occasionally.  I have had to replace one head, but others than that it has been smooth. 
Gary
Very well said, indeed exceptionally so.

I feel the same way about having a printer in house bigger than I can rationally justify to anyone but myself, yet I have a totally understanding family who never forces me to explain :)
Title: Re: Do I want a 24 inch printer?
Post by: PeterAit on March 26, 2018, 09:48:04 AM
Very well said, indeed exceptionally so.

I feel the same way about having a printer in house bigger than I can rationally justify to anyone but myself, yet I have a totally understanding family who never forces me to explain :)

"Rationally justify?" Bwahahaha!
Title: Re: Do I want a 24 inch printer?
Post by: patjoja on March 26, 2018, 01:49:36 PM
I'm an retired bum who loves photography and has been doing it in varying levels of intensity for over 50 years. Now, it's all I do, almost every day. I do some traveling in the US and internationally, but mostly stay at home in the beautiful Pacific Northwest. There is lots to photograph within a few hundred miles of my home.

I recently purchased a Sony A7RIII and have enjoyed it and its impressive resolution. I have used the Epson 38xx series of printers since 2007 and now use a 3880. It has been almost totally problem free. My largest prints currently are 13x20 in 22x28 frames. I occasionally, but quite infrequently actually sell an image but not so that I make any significant money. I'd like to try some larger prints, eg 24x36. Locally they cost in the US$150 range each.

My questions are for those who own a 24 inch printer for personal use.

Which printer did you choose and why? Epson-Canon?
What do you do with the large prints?
Do you frame them, is it not quite expensive?
Have you had to buy a new home to have place to display them ;D? I am fortunate to have a home with picture molding so my framed prints hang easily on wires from the molding without putting holes in the wall.
Have you come up with a way to display them effectively without framing?
Assuming I were to purchase an Epson P7000, and have read Keith Cooper's excellent review, (http://www.northlight-images.co.uk/epson-surecolor-p7000-printer-review/#conclusions) have you found it to be worthwhile? Do you often make prints on letter size paper and is it a hassle?

Any comments would be most welcome. I'm in the early thought processing place with this idea. I'd consider the equivalent Canon printer but like to use QTR for my black and white images and according to a recent reply from Roy Harrington himself, QTR will not be coming to Canon. Also I heard/read that the Canon's work only with roll paper.

To help you decide on whether a 24" printer is right for you, you need to decide if your images present better in a larger size.  Many landscape images do look better bigger.  If so, go for it.  You can always go smaller, but it's pretty tough to go bigger.

I have 3 printers, Canon Pro-1, Canon iPF6450, and Epson 3880.  I do use the Canon Pro-1 quite a bit for test prints in letter size.  No hassle there. 

As far as room, I have 2 rooms I've devoted to my studio.  One is an upstairs bedroom and the other is a former formal living room.  It's getting a lot more use now!

I do most all my own framing.  I invested in an underpinner and saws last year and now cut all my own molding. I usually mount my color images on self adhesive gator foam and frame them similar to an oil painting.  The prints get 6 coats of Hahnemuhle protective spray for abrasion and UV protection.   For my black and white images, I use black frames, with mats and museum glass (those are the expensive ones...)

Regards,

Patrick
Title: Re: Do I want a 24 inch printer?
Post by: Eric Brody on March 28, 2018, 11:44:38 AM
Many thanks to all who replied to my question. I must now do more looking, perhaps look at and handle some larger prints to see if this is really what I want to do. This forum and especially Mark Segal, genuine guru of all things printer, are a wonderful and helpful resource.
Title: Re: Do I want a 24 inch printer?
Post by: Mark D Segal on March 28, 2018, 11:49:04 AM
Much appreciated Eric, and I hope you land on a choice you will be happy with.
Title: Re: Do I want a 24 inch printer?
Post by: Joe Towner on March 29, 2018, 11:07:11 AM
It's just a matter of if you need to own it yourself or can find a way to split the cost with others.  There are a few recent threads about getting into printing, and it's always about the cost.  How much do you print now?  Have you regularly taken a memory card to Costco and done up some 24x36 prints - they're $15 on semi-gloss and you can get ICC profiles.

Part of having a printer is to spread the images to places and people you know.  Everything may need a frame, but don't go all in on high end frames.  For personal enjoyment, Ikea and the like have options designed to not break the bank.  Plus you can easily change the print yourself - much less involved compared to framing and mat cutting.  Always look at a printer as a means to put ink on paper.  Always consider the cost per ml of ink, it'll help you understand the investment on a per square foot basis. 

If you head up to Seattle let me know, I'm still figuring out my 11880 - yes, the paper logic goes all the way up.
Title: Re: Do I want a 24 inch printer?
Post by: TommyWeir on March 29, 2018, 02:44:52 PM
I bought a little P600 last year, best thing I did.  I'm looking to go to a P800 and I think between stock and ink, replenishing that will just about be my financial limit.   I am especially looking forward to the P800 and larger sizes now that John Cone has his piezography set for both the P600 and the P800 available.

Just to echo the last poster, IKEA frames are cheap and are much improved if you learn how to cut your own mattes. 

And to echo others, printing had the biggest impact upon my photography last year.  I look forward to having a 44" someday...
Title: Re: Do I want a 24 inch printer?
Post by: sportmaster on March 29, 2018, 08:07:30 PM
You want a 44" printer.

Title: Re: Do I want a 24 inch printer?
Post by: jeyell on April 04, 2018, 07:17:54 AM
My print history began with the excellent 17" Epson 3800 which served me well for 9 flawless years. I got to learn ICC profiles, paper selection, workflow and the pure joy of seeing my own work appear on something I can touch and share - physically. This last part is what printing means to me and once you surround yourself with your own printed work the pieces come alive in a new way that cannot be achieved via transmissive screens. Its like being surrounded by friends and 17" is a great entry point.

Once the Epson's head expired I wanted more of that joy in larger format. Its the same feeling that drives TV sizes from 24" 20 years ago to 65+" now. As camera sensors are enlarging, increasing resolution while improving quality going larger on the print end of the workflow just let images sing on the paper. You of course have to justify the higher cost of 24". To me its the same as one very good quality lens. A balanced spend of money to produce the complete "performance" means not spending $5-10k on capture/editing gear to share images on a $300 iPad. It means investing on the backend of the workflow which is often ignored.

I considered print/head/ink technology, physical size, cost and what I wanted to produce. This led me to a Canon Pro 2000, but there is very very little difference between modern printers. They won't make your photographs better, but like a sharp meat knife you will enjoy a better result.