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Author Topic: New Epson 9890 arriving, USB vs ethernet, and should I get a surge suppressor?  (Read 2474 times)

disneytoy

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Hi gang,

My 9890 will arrive in less than a week.

I've never printed via Ethernet. Can any explain the pros and cons of printing USB vs Ethernet?  This will not be on a network. Just perhaps a crossover cable.

Secondly, I would like to get a surge suppressor. I haven't had any issues in the last 12 years with any electric surges, but playing it safe, and speccification I should consider in shopping for one? What is the current draw of a 9890?

Thanks

Max
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Ken Doo

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If there is no need for a "network" connection, I'd use USB. It's simple. It works. The only limitation being the length of the USB cable (distance between printer and computer.)

I think using a surge suppressor with battery (UPS) is a good thing, if not for anything but piece of mind. (not for laser printers!).

ken

bjanes

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Hi gang,

My 9890 will arrive in less than a week.

I've never printed via Ethernet. Can any explain the pros and cons of printing USB vs Ethernet?  This will not be on a network. Just perhaps a crossover cable.

Secondly, I would like to get a surge suppressor. I haven't had any issues in the last 12 years with any electric surges, but playing it safe, and speccification I should consider in shopping for one? What is the current draw of a 9890?

Thanks

Max

While awaiting delivery of the printer, you can download the manual here. The manual states that the power consumption is 70 watts. If there is no need for a network connection, I would use USB, provided that the cable is less than the suggested 10 feet maximum length.  Setup is easier with USB. If you have an extra ethernet port on your computer, you could use a crossover cable, but I know of no advantage of an ethernet connection.

Regards,

Bill
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digitaldog

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I’ve used both Ethernet and USB. Ethernet can be more flaky and if you don’t need to share the printer on a network or run from multiple machines and have the computer close enough to use USB, got that route.
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Andrew Rodney
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disneytoy

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Thanks guys!

I will go USB. I'll have a dedicated computer attached to the 9890, So i won't need a long USB. This has been well over a year researching and finally ordering. I got a great deal $2999. No tax free shipping free loift gate. Bought $200 in Epson paper (Which I was going to do anyway) and got an additional $200 Epson Glossy free. Will arrive after the 31st. I've familiarized with the set-up process. I have a very long relationship with Epson's from my first Epson Photo. Also have good experience with a 3880 and the K3 inks. I can't wait til it is here.

I've even assembled 4 of the 9 - 350mml replacement cartridges. I'm a deal hunter!!!

Merry Christmas to all of you!

Marc
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PeterAit

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There is no advantage to using ethernet if you are not on a network, and assuming the printer is close enough to the computer for USB. The power draw will be in the printer's specs, shd be on the mfg page.

 
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Peter
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disneytoy

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Thanks everyone.
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John Sluder

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Both are good interfaces, I use either net if available has the options for sharing to other printer on the network

a UPS is a good idea if you are in area that has poor power quality, nothing is more of a problem is and power dip printing the last image on the last bit of paper. In NYC they have great power, but in Florida the power company is horrid, UPS is paramount...

Garnick

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I agree, USB simply works.  Even though you've mentioned that you will be close enough to accommodate the supposed cable length "issue", it is indeed not an issue.  For many years I've been using 3-15ft USB cables to span the distance from my 9900 to the computer.  These are USB Active Extention cables that you can find at any computer store.  They do suggest not using more than three in succession, but that's all I need for my setup.  I can attest to the fact that a USB run of slightly more than 45ft is very doable, with no adverse effects.  As a matter of fact, when I first took possession of the printer more than 4 years ago I had several warranty service calls for various issues.  On more that one occasion it was suggested by the service tech that I should not be using the long run USB.  In each case I moved the printer to within the prescribed distance and used a 6ft cable to print my "control" file and then back to the original distance using the USB Active Extention cables and printed the same file.  On both occasions the tech had to admit that there was no discernible difference between the two prints.  Just a nibble of info that might help someone up against a possible USB long run issue.  See the two URLs below for examples of these extension cables.  There are now cables that will extend up to 150 ft if necessary.  

http://www.canadacomputers.com/product_info.php?cPath=1340_1418_97&item_id=076291
http://www.canadacomputers.com/product_info.php?cPath=1340_1418_97&item_id=030569

Gary      
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disneytoy

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Thanks Gary, great info.
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bjanes

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I agree, USB simply works.  Even though you've mentioned that you will be close enough to accommodate the supposed cable length "issue", it is indeed not an issue.  For many years I've been using 3-15ft USB cables to span the distance from my 9900 to the computer.  These are USB Active Extention cables that you can find at any computer store.  They do suggest not using more than three in succession, but that's all I need for my setup.  I can attest to the fact that a USB run of slightly more than 45ft is very doable, with no adverse effects.  As a matter of fact, when I first took possession of the printer more than 4 years ago I had several warranty service calls for various issues.  On more that one occasion it was suggested by the service tech that I should not be using the long run USB.  In each case I moved the printer to within the prescribed distance and used a 6ft cable to print my "control" file and then back to the original distance using the USB Active Extention cables and printed the same file.  On both occasions the tech had to admit that there was no discernible difference between the two prints.  Just a nibble of info that might help someone up against a possible USB long run issue.  See the two URLs below for examples of these extension cables.  There are now cables that will extend up to 150 ft if necessary.  

http://www.canadacomputers.com/product_info.php?cPath=1340_1418_97&item_id=076291
http://www.canadacomputers.com/product_info.php?cPath=1340_1418_97&item_id=030569

Gary      

Those active USB cables are USB2, which is pretty slow compared to gigabit ethertnet as mentioned here in the context of NAS. I don't know what flavor of USB the Epson has, but ethernet might be faster. However, speed is probably not a major concern, since print times are much longer than spool times.

Bill
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Garnick

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Those active USB cables are USB2, which is pretty slow compared to gigabit ethertnet as mentioned here in the context of NAS. I don't know what flavor of USB the Epson has, but ethernet might be faster. However, speed is probably not a major concern, since print times are much longer than spool times.

Bill

Hi Bill,

I'm reasonably certain that an Ethernet connection would indeed be faster, although for me it's not an issue.  Most of my work consists of printing for other photographers, as well as art reproduction etc.  Since I tend to concentrate on one image at a time, the travel time from computer to printer has never presented itself as a bottleneck in my workflow.  I will admit that when I first set up the Active Extension USB cable system I was somewhat concerned about the possible slowdown of send/receive times.  However, when I tested that system against a 10ft cable I was pleasantly surprised to find a very small difference, even with a large file size.  Of course others may find the USB connection too slow for their workflow, and understandably so.  I my situation it works very well.

Gary
   



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Even though a big part of my life has been spent dealing with negatives, they generally end up being positives -- gan

PeterAit

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Hi Bill,

I'm reasonably certain that an Ethernet connection would indeed be faster, although for me it's not an issue.  Most of my work consists of printing for other photographers, as well as art reproduction etc.  Since I tend to concentrate on one image at a time, the travel time from computer to printer has never presented itself as a bottleneck in my workflow.  I will admit that when I first set up the Active Extension USB cable system I was somewhat concerned about the possible slowdown of send/receive times.  However, when I tested that system against a 10ft cable I was pleasantly surprised to find a very small difference, even with a large file size.  Of course others may find the USB connection too slow for their workflow, and understandably so.  I my situation it works very well.

This is really not relevant. The printing process itself is 1000x slower than either USB or Ethernet, and if a print is going to take 60 seconds to come out of the printer, it doesn't make one whit of difference whether the data took 5 seconds or 10 seconds to get there.
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Peter
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Garnick

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This is really not relevant. The printing process itself is 1000x slower than either USB or Ethernet, and if a print is going to take 60 seconds to come out of the printer, it doesn't make one whit of difference whether the data took 5 seconds or 10 seconds to get there.

Occasionally "relevance" is also irrelevant. 
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Even though a big part of my life has been spent dealing with negatives, they generally end up being positives -- gan

digitaldog

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Peter is absolutely correct that the bottleneck is not getting the data to the printer, it’s printing the data. Either method will take the same time for printing, the Epson starts as soon as it gets enough data to start the process.
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Andrew Rodney
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Garnick

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Peter is absolutely correct that the bottleneck is not getting the data to the printer, it’s printing the data. Either method will take the same time for printing, the Epson starts as soon as it gets enough data to start the process.

And once again, I agree.  My little quip was meant only to point out the "irrelevance" of stating the obvious.  I would imagine that anyone who has done much printing with these machines is quite aware of the basic insignificance of the file transport time compared with the actual printing time.  However, I may be mistaken, and it certainly wouldn't be the first time.  If so, I hope you will forgive my "quipage".  It was not meant to provoke.

Gary     
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LuLa - The source of ALL! -- "There's nothing worse than a sharp image of a fuzzy concept" -- Ansel Adams
Even though a big part of my life has been spent dealing with negatives, they generally end up being positives -- gan

bjanes

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And once again, I agree.  My little quip was meant only to point out the "irrelevance" of stating the obvious.  I would imagine that anyone who has done much printing with these machines is quite aware of the basic insignificance of the file transport time compared with the actual printing time.  However, I may be mistaken, and it certainly wouldn't be the first time.  If so, I hope you will forgive my "quipage".  It was not meant to provoke.

Gary     

Indeed, I said as much in my reply #10 some time ago. However, it is good to know the difference in transmission speed among various modalities (USB, Bluetooth, Ethernet, etc) for applications other than printing. The active USBwould likely not be the best solution for driving a portable hard drive or for a video streaming application.

For a dedicated Epson printer attached to a single computer, USB is the simplest solution. Installation of a network printer is more complicated, but the better printer and computer manufacturers provide good installation utilities. I run my Epson photo printer via USB but I have two HP Laserjets (monochrome and color) and they have operated flawlessly for years after installation with the HP utility from Windows. I recently bought a MacBook Pro laptop and wanted to use the network printers on it. I clicked on install printer icon on the Mac while on WiFi, and within moments the driver was automatically downloaded and installed. The printers work flawlessly. So if a networked installation might be useful, users should not shy away from it.

Bill
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