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Author Topic: Approaching Storm  (Read 3099 times)

michael

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Approaching Storm
« on: August 30, 2014, 09:51:53 AM »

This topic is for discussion of the image and commentary found in Michael's Phlog titled Approaching Storm.
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kikashi

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Re: Approaching Storm
« Reply #1 on: August 30, 2014, 10:57:07 AM »

Wow. I trust you found shelter before it reached you!

Jeremy
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William Walker

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Re: Approaching Storm
« Reply #2 on: August 31, 2014, 07:18:08 AM »

"It isn't often that one gets to make a portfolio-grade shot while having dinner at home with ones family."

This raises the question: do you sit and wait in one spot for something to happen, or do you drive around looking for something and possibly missing an opportunity where you were ten minutes previously?

The answer, I suppose, is to wait in a spectacular spot for something wonderful to come along...

William

michael

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Re: Approaching Storm
« Reply #3 on: August 31, 2014, 08:08:02 AM »

"It isn't often that one gets to make a portfolio-grade shot while having dinner at home with ones family."

This raises the question: do you sit and wait in one spot for something to happen, or do you drive around looking for something and possibly missing an opportunity where you were ten minutes previously?

The answer, I suppose, is to wait in a spectacular spot for something wonderful to come along...

William

I've always described this as the difference between hunters and fisherman. Some photographers work slowly, explore a situation and wait for the light. Others are like sharks...they have to keep moving, looking for the next image.

Michael
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Bert Reimer

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Re: Approaching Storm
« Reply #4 on: September 08, 2014, 09:43:58 AM »

My current camera/lens combo is a 24-85mm which I use at the wide end for 90% of my shots. But lately I keep wishing I had something closer to a 14mm to get the same picture height in landscape mode as I do now in portrait mode. Do you feel this photo would have been even more dramatic in ultrawide landscape or does that bring in too many distracting elements from the side?
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michael

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Re: Approaching Storm
« Reply #5 on: September 09, 2014, 10:44:07 AM »

Of course the drama is the ominous roiling clouds. The choice of focal length was determined by trying to achieve a balance between them and not having the copse of trees become too small in the frame.

It was shot at 45mm (645 format). I could have switched to the 35mm and tried a wider composition, but I was at risk standing in the middle of the road, and the rain started to come down heavily, so I called it a day.

Such decisions are always a toss-up.

Michael


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Praki

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Re: Approaching Storm
« Reply #6 on: September 09, 2014, 11:21:11 PM »

Michael:

I am trying to understand the parameters that went into your choice of exposure. I realize that the rules some times have to be broken, when I look at the raw file under the finished image, on my screen the dark tones looked blocked out. If ETTR is to be in effect, should the exposure have been different? Also was this a aperture priority exposure or manual? Perhaps the time sensitivity - storm is atop you etc., determined a lot of things; there was enough detail in the shadows to bring out the fence etc. during post processing - did you see this in the viewfinder prior to the exposure?

The image is outstanding - especially considering the amount of time available to set up and take the image.

Thanks.
P.
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michael

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Re: Approaching Storm
« Reply #7 on: September 10, 2014, 05:52:27 PM »

The exposure parameters were simple. The camera was in Aperture priority mode and at ISO 100. I set the aperture to between f/5.6 and f/8, which is the lens's sweet spot, and this produced a shutter speed of 1/160 sec, which was more than enough for a hand held shot at 24mm focal length. I don't think it could have been set more optimally in the situation.

Michael
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