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Author Topic: Preset Crop?  (Read 1123 times)

KeithR

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Preset Crop?
« on: August 24, 2014, 04:29:32 PM »

I normally crop my images as I see fit on an image by image basis but have an assignment coming up(for web posting) where the images need to fit a specific size and all horizontal. I've never had to do this and was told that it could be done in LR. Is that so and if so, how?
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Slobodan Blagojevic

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Re: Preset Crop?
« Reply #1 on: August 24, 2014, 06:06:21 PM »

Are you asking how to do it on an image-by-image basis, or how to do it for all images in the series simultaneously? I assume you would need first to do it on an image-by-image bases, because of compositional requirements (i.e., you would not want the new crop to cut off important parts)?

Slobodan Blagojevic

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Re: Preset Crop?
« Reply #2 on: August 24, 2014, 06:29:18 PM »

In the Develop Module, click on a dotted rectangle (Crop Overlay) and then on the "Original." In the drop-down menu, click on the "Enter Custom" where you will enter the required aspect ratio. The aspect ratio could be as simple as 2:3, or 4:3 (in which case you would not need a custom ratio size, since LR already has the most common ones), or as complex as, for instance, 878x453 (say that is the exact dimension in pixels the client required). Now you have a custom (or standard) ratio size you need to apply to every image in the series.

This is not the end, however. In the File>Export dialog, you will then have to enter the exact pixel dimensions in the Image Sizing field.

Ray R

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Re: Preset Crop?
« Reply #3 on: August 24, 2014, 06:53:01 PM »

I have found it quicker to apply the crop (locked) to all the images. Then view them one by one with the crop open, and then move the crop or adjust it.

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Rendezvous

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Re: Preset Crop?
« Reply #4 on: August 24, 2014, 07:02:06 PM »

You can always edit one, then select all of them and synchronise the crop.

Slobodan Blagojevic

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Re: Preset Crop?
« Reply #5 on: August 24, 2014, 07:39:13 PM »

You can always edit one, then select all of them and synchronise the crop.

Yes, but that does not solve the problem that what works for one image will work for the next, compositionally.

luxborealis

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Re: Preset Crop?
« Reply #6 on: August 25, 2014, 08:09:24 AM »

Yes, but that does not solve the problem that what works for one image will work for the next, compositionally.

The only way to solve that problem, is to do as Ray suggested. It can be a drag, but it' she only way to ensure accuracy.
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John Caldwell

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Re: Preset Crop?
« Reply #7 on: August 29, 2014, 09:36:40 PM »

Crop is not a Develop Preset parameter. Crop is available as a Synchronize parameter. So crop image number one as you see fit, then select all images to which you want to assign this particular crop. Note the LR allows you to treat Crop Rotation (usually a horizon line correction) and Crop Aspect Ratio (what you are looking for I think) separately in the synchronization. After you've done your sync, open the Crop tool in image number one, then select image number 2 and the Crop tool will be the active tool. You can then drag the image to shift your subject matter within that crop, without giving up the crop aspect ratio.

The OP probably understands that cropping all images in a series to a given aspect ratio may have its artistic trade offs, but he may be looking from crop uniformity to suit other goals.

John Caldwell
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