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Author Topic: Framed* 2.0  (Read 13146 times)

BernardLanguillier

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Framed* 2.0
« on: August 04, 2014, 10:55:24 PM »

Team,

I don't know whether you are familiar with this Kickstarter project? https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1353046055/framed-a-revolutionary-platform-for-digital-art

Although photographers may not be the core target for now, it still seems extremely promising.

The idea sounds like a good implementation of the concepts proposed here in 2008.

Cheers,
Bernard
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louoates

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Re: Framed* 2.0
« Reply #1 on: August 05, 2014, 12:47:32 PM »

I've wondered when this concept would come to market. I love to see how many creative ideas are stemming from the digital image evolution. Lots of new opportunities for artists and entrepreneurs.   
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Slobodan Blagojevic

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Re: Framed* 2.0
« Reply #2 on: August 05, 2014, 12:59:43 PM »

As I wrote in a forum post in 2012:

I was in a furniture store the other day and noticed they are using flat-TVs to display images of their collections, kind of slide show. Then it hit me: how long before the price of a TV equates the price of framing a print? At this point, printing and framing a 24x36 print would cost between $200 and $300, give or take. The same dimension TV is 43" diagonally and they are currently already close to that, i.e., around $400-$500. Wait for a deal, and you just might get it for the price of framing a single print.

Add to the equation that, for the purpose of displaying photos only, the TV may be stripped of all other features, kind of a giant photo frame, and you can see how close the prices will converge.

And that is all in comparison to ONE framed print. A TV can display gazillion of them. Imagine the problem most people have with large prints on their walls: they do not have enough walls! Let alone the effect of getting used to seeing the same print day in, day out, to the point of becoming oblivious to it.

Add to the equation that most photographs look better on screen than in print (contrast ratio, reflecting vs. emitting light, etc.).

Finally, here comes Retina display, to address the most common argument in favor of print: resolution. Retina display already matches and surpasses ppi of most prints.

Most of todays gazillion photographs, dare I say 99.9 % of it, will never, ever be printed. People are already content with showing it on Flickr, Facebook or emailing it, watching it on their phones, computers and iPads.

And that is all happening already today. For tomorrow, no wonder I feel the print is dead, for all but the selected few.

EDIT: Shall I add that Kodak was betting its future on printing... we know the outcome.

LesPalenik

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Re: Framed* 2.0
« Reply #3 on: August 13, 2014, 09:53:08 PM »

Actually, it could be the same wall-mounted TV that is used now for watching the news.
It could have a number of modes: cable/streamed content, display monitor for browsing personal pictures and videos, decoration/wall-paper with favorite photos, and the sleep mode when nobody is in the room.

I could see that with lower TV prices, some people may hang two or three such units on a wall for simultaneous watching of streamed content, and when they are done watching, they turn on the gallery mode with color coordinated pictures.


Peter Mellis

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Re: Framed* 2.0
« Reply #4 on: August 19, 2014, 09:54:43 AM »

I have a 60" Plasma TV (Pioneer) that I bought a few years back because it had the best picture quality (that I could discern) at that time. I used to stream a file of my photos to it through an AppleTV and ITunes. Viewed at normal viewing distance the pictures were terrific and, as good as the color pictures were, B&W was even better. I believe that plasma TV's (no longer made) produced better blacks than other types, so that may have something to do with it.
Although I much prefer prints, I could easily see using a TV as a way to show one's portfolio, at home. Would be a nice solution for people with apartments.
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BernardLanguillier

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Re: Framed* 2.0
« Reply #5 on: August 19, 2014, 08:32:43 PM »

I have a 60" Plasma TV (Pioneer) that I bought a few years back because it had the best picture quality (that I could discern) at that time. I used to stream a file of my photos to it through an AppleTV and ITunes. Viewed at normal viewing distance the pictures were terrific and, as good as the color pictures were, B&W was even better. I believe that plasma TV's (no longer made) produced better blacks than other types, so that may have something to do with it.
Although I much prefer prints, I could easily see using a TV as a way to show one's portfolio, at home. Would be a nice solution for people with apartments.

Yes, indeed. 4K at smaller sizes (55 inch) makes thing even better. That becomes pretty impressive.

I have finally decided not to invest for now in Frame* 2.0. It is an interesting product with good potential, but right now it is more focused on interactive art than it is on photographs display. I'll look into it once again once they, or someone else, offers 4K panels at competitive prices.

Cheers,
Bernard
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Alan Klein

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Re: Framed* 2.0
« Reply #6 on: September 02, 2014, 09:50:40 PM »

Thanks Bernard.  This might be the answer I need.  My wife won't let me remount my 16x20" photos on walls of our new house.  There still sitting in boxes since we moved a year ago!   Of course I can still show slide shows on my 65" hdtv.  But I still have a lot of juicy empty wall space that seems very lonely.  
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