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Author Topic: The latest from Colorado  (Read 1006 times)

rgs

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The latest from Colorado
« on: July 27, 2014, 06:58:21 PM »

I have just returned from a visit to my daughter and her family in Colorado. Here are a few from the trip. Enjoy. Comments gratefully received.

Paulo Bizarro

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Re: The latest from Colorado
« Reply #1 on: July 28, 2014, 03:46:19 AM »

Seems like a great place to hike and photograph, I can only be envious. My favourites are #'s 1 and 2: a good general view with added mystery from the fog; and an intimate study of texture on the bark/tree.

#3 for me does not work, the light is poor and washed out in the sky.

Walt Roycraft

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Re: The latest from Colorado
« Reply #2 on: July 28, 2014, 06:35:40 AM »

Seems like a great place to hike and photograph, I can only be envious. My favourites are #'s 1 and 2: a good general view with added mystery from the fog; and an intimate study of texture on the bark/tree.

#3 for me does not work, the light is poor and washed out in the sky.

Agree'd
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maddogmurph

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Re: The latest from Colorado
« Reply #3 on: July 30, 2014, 06:15:14 PM »

Seems like a great place to hike and photograph, I can only be envious. My favourites are #'s 1 and 2: a good general view with added mystery from the fog; and an intimate study of texture on the bark/tree.

#3 for me does not work, the light is poor and washed out in the sky.

Interesting I was going to say 1,2 & 4 aren't doing much for me, and 3 would look good as an HDR.  I'm not a huge fan of HDR.  But the only way to capture what you were after *which I might add was a good eye (The beautiful twisting bark of this tree) would be to have an over exposed sky.  You can't use a grad filter because of the shape and position of the tree.  The only solution is to combine 2 or more images one with the sky in proper focus, and the other with the tree, then combine them in post production.
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Maddog - Apologetically critical

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rgs

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Re: The latest from Colorado
« Reply #4 on: July 30, 2014, 07:02:40 PM »

Interesting I was going to say 1,2 & 4 aren't doing much for me, and 3 would look good as an HDR.  I'm not a huge fan of HDR.  But the only way to capture what you were after *which I might add was a good eye (The beautiful twisting bark of this tree) would be to have an over exposed sky.  You can't use a grad filter because of the shape and position of the tree.  The only solution is to combine 2 or more images one with the sky in proper focus, and the other with the tree, then combine them in post production.

I agree about #3. It's a mid afternoon shot at about 12,000 feet, a bristle-cone forest on Mt. Evans just below the tree line. I was with my family so moving faster than usual. That midday mountain light can be quite harsh (and blue). Most of the time I would either blend exposures using Exposure Fusion (not HDR) and/or shoot earlier or later in the day. I'm not sure I'm going to get much more out of that one. #2 was made at the same time (it's the same tree up close) but, without the sky, is, I think, much better. I also like the little knot in the center right of #2. If I had seen it while I was there, I would have made a macro of it. As it is, I'm afraid the file would not survive that severe of a crop.

maddogmurph

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Re: The latest from Colorado
« Reply #5 on: July 30, 2014, 07:10:10 PM »

That area is beautiful isn't it.  I agree with you on the knob.  The bristle cones are a difficult photograph for me.  I have shot these trees, and can never capture the feeling.  If I could pump the spirit of a 4000 year old tree into my photograph I'm sure it would look amazing, but somehow that spirit seems to escape every time I click the button.  Case in point - from the Pentax WG-3 on the Pacific Crest Trial.
« Last Edit: July 30, 2014, 07:14:04 PM by maddogmurph »
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Maddog - Apologetically critical

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Dave Pluimer

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Re: The latest from Colorado
« Reply #6 on: August 01, 2014, 10:49:24 AM »

I think #3 has a lot of B&W potential.
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