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Author Topic: Critique Guidelines  (Read 5904 times)

Jonathan Wienke

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Critique Guidelines
« on: September 22, 2005, 01:34:07 AM »

Some thoughts I've had regarding critiques, and how to make them more valuable to the photographer seeking them:

Photographers:
1. Let people know what you're looking for. Hopefully, it's something more than ego-scratching. Why did you make the image, and what are you trying to communicate to the viewer? What is the purpose of the image, or does it even have one? Are you trying to improve the artistic or technical aspects of the image, or both? What criteria should the image meet for you to consider the image a success, and why?

2. Be mature enough to consider the possibility that your image may not be all it can be, or that it might even totally suck. A negative critique may not be easy to accept, but negative critiques are one of the best tools you have to learn what you are doing wrong and improve your skills in the long run. Don't bother posting if you're convinced that your image is perfect.

3. If you don't really want to hear other people's opinions of your work, don't solicit them. It's a waste of time for everyone involved; photographer, critic(s) and anyone else reading the thread.

Critics:
1. Be as honest as possible without being rude or offensive. If an image lacks merit, say so. But don't bring the personal habits of other people's mothers into the discussion.

2. Be specific. If you like an image, explain why you like it, and if you dislike it, explain why as well. Neither "awesome image" nor "OMG, THAT SuXxORZ!!!" are particularly useful comments; they shed no light on what was done right or wrong, and are equally useless applied to the context of improving future work.

3. Be constructive. If you believe an image lacks merit, don't simply trash it, suggest something concrete that can address or prevent the shortcoming. If it's something that is only applicable to future images, great, but if it can improve the image being discussed, even better.


I'd like to see this area become a useful resource for photographers trying to improve their work, and I believe that these guidlines can help everyone here achieve that goal.

DISCLAIMER: I'm not a moderator or admin, so these views are mine, and are not necessarily the official views of LL management.

opgr

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Critique Guidelines
« Reply #1 on: September 22, 2005, 06:43:06 AM »

Some additional ideas come to mind:

If posting a cropped image, then possibly add a small original to reveal more of the context for easier discussion of the framing.

It is not very useful to post an image that you like, but don't know why. I think it is more constructive to post an image whereby you can explain why you choose that specific composition, what you wanted to reveal (or obscure) etc...
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Oscar Rysdyk
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opgr

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Critique Guidelines
« Reply #2 on: September 22, 2005, 06:47:22 AM »

Oh yeah, and did I mention to ATTACH the freaking PROFILE to an image if you post it to the internut?
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Oscar Rysdyk
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jani

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Critique Guidelines
« Reply #3 on: September 22, 2005, 06:59:59 AM »

Quote
Oh yeah, and did I mention to ATTACH the freaking PROFILE to an image if you post it to the internut?
... and if you don't attach a profile anyway, please pretty please convert it to sRGB and check that it looks okay before posting?
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Jan

Paul Sumi

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Critique Guidelines
« Reply #4 on: September 23, 2005, 12:17:25 PM »

Quote
Quote
Oh yeah, and did I mention to ATTACH the freaking PROFILE to an image if you post it to the internut?
... and if you don't attach a profile anyway, please pretty please convert it to sRGB and check that it looks okay before posting?
And preserving the EXIF data in the JPG so the technically-minded can see the camera settings is helpful, too.

Aside: PhotoShop "save for web" destroys EXIF data but gives better control over file size.  "Save as" (.JPG) preserves EXIF but does not have as fine control over file size.

Paul

Paul Sumi

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Critique Guidelines
« Reply #5 on: September 23, 2005, 12:20:52 PM »

Quote
I'd like to see this area become a useful resource for photographers trying to improve their work, and I believe that these guidlines can help everyone here achieve that goal.
Well put and codified, Jonathan.

Paul

DiaAzul

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Critique Guidelines
« Reply #6 on: September 28, 2005, 05:42:16 AM »

Quote
Aside: PhotoShop "save for web" destroys EXIF data but gives better control over file size. "Save as" (.JPG) preserves EXIF but does not have as fine control over file size.
If you wish to resize JPEGs and save them within a specific file size you may wish to try BDSizer freeware.idimager.com. There is nothing sophisticated about what it does (it's very simple), but what it does it does well (also preserves EXIF info and can sharpen the image if required).

(Sorry, windows only)
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David Plummer    http://photo.tanzo.org/
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