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Author Topic: Infrared season  (Read 1893 times)

leuallen

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Infrared season
« on: May 12, 2014, 09:20:38 AM »

Spring is my favorite time of the year for taking infrared images. In the summer the fields and trees are in full bloom and tossing so much infrared around that everything seems white. Spring, however, does not have this problem. This is a particularly good time of the year since the corn is just sprouting and is 3 or 4 inches high. This creates interesting row patterns in the fields. These patterns are often barely visible to the naked eye but are brought out by infrared contrast.

Larry
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Eric Myrvaagnes

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Re: Infrared season
« Reply #1 on: May 12, 2014, 10:25:22 AM »

This is a terrific set of images. You make a good case for springtime IR. These are all lovely, and not "over the top" like so many IR shots.
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-Eric Myrvaagnes    (A sampler of my new book is on my website.)
http://myrvaagnes.com  Visit my photo website (Server is back up). New images each season. Also visit my new website: http://ericneedsakidney.org

Jim Kasson

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Re: Infrared season
« Reply #2 on: May 12, 2014, 10:46:11 AM »

This is great!

thierrylegros396

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Re: Infrared season
« Reply #3 on: May 12, 2014, 11:44:06 AM »

A road to get seasickness  :D :D
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Rajan Parrikar

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Re: Infrared season
« Reply #4 on: May 12, 2014, 12:35:02 PM »

Beautiful geometry in 1 and 3.

leuallen

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Re: Infrared season
« Reply #5 on: May 12, 2014, 03:03:52 PM »

Eric

Good sets of photographs don't come around that often but all of these were captured in a two day span. I had been suffering a drought where nothing worked and then the damn burst. I don't like the over the top look either. If you pick your subjects carefully you can avoid it.

thierrylegros396

Not really that bad (sea sickness). Lens compression adds to that effect.

Jim

Thanks. This photo had its genesis in another I took one road east. That one almost worked except for the fact that the depth of field did not hold focus for the length of the road. So I learned my lesson and tried a focus stack, my first, of four images. The sharpness fore to aft is what helps make the picture. The other important factor is the lens compression of 400mm EFL.

Rajan

Geometry. Loved the subject in high school and grew up to become a drafting instructor which is geometry based. I always look for geometry. Many of my pictures are influenced by my drafting education.

Larry
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kikashi

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Re: Infrared season
« Reply #6 on: May 12, 2014, 03:14:24 PM »

These are really good, particularly #3.

Now, where can I find an old camera to have converted? Hmm.

Jeremy
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leuallen

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Re: Infrared season
« Reply #7 on: May 12, 2014, 04:20:32 PM »

Jeremy.

If I may suggest a Panasonic G1 with the kit 14-45 lens. That is what I use. Should be relatively cheap for the used body, $250 for the conversion (720 nm). It converts to IR very well allowing good hand held exposures. The lens has no hot spots as some do. That said, all of the above were taken with the Oly 50-200 lens on tripod, manual focus only. I gotten plenty of good images using just the kit lens, very sharp. Actually I've had more fun with this combo than with my EM-1.

Larry

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kikashi

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Re: Infrared season
« Reply #8 on: May 13, 2014, 04:04:17 AM »

If I may suggest a Panasonic G1 with the kit 14-45 lens. That is what I use. Should be relatively cheap for the used body, $250 for the conversion (720 nm). It converts to IR very well allowing good hand held exposures. The lens has no hot spots as some do. That said, all of the above were taken with the Oly 50-200 lens on tripod, manual focus only. I gotten plenty of good images using just the kit lens, very sharp. Actually I've had more fun with this combo than with my EM-1.

Thanks, Larry. I have an old Canon 20D that I haven't used for several years, since I bought my 5D2. Converting that would allow me to use my Canon glass, too. Any thoughts?

Jeremy
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Paulo Bizarro

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Re: Infrared season
« Reply #9 on: May 13, 2014, 04:12:51 AM »

Very good set.

leuallen

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Re: Infrared season
« Reply #10 on: May 13, 2014, 11:15:55 AM »

Jeremy

The only advantage the mirrorless would have is that it is wysiwyg, that is, you will see the effect of the infrared on the sensor in the viewfinder, optical will appear normal. The other thing to try and check is that if your existing lenses would be suitable. Some lenses give pronounced hot spots in the center of the frame when used with IR. For m4/3 lenses someone did a test and listed the good performers vs the bad. You might check the internet as see if something similar is available for Canon lenses. I would also check and see if the 20D is a good candidate for IR conversion, some cameras convert better than others.

If you don't have Nik SilverEffects Pro 2 add that to the list as it is an important component in my processing of IR.

Larry
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kikashi

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Re: Infrared season
« Reply #11 on: May 13, 2014, 03:48:11 PM »

Thanks. I'll do that.

I have SFX Pro. It's a superb piece of software. I thought LR's B&W conversions were good (which they are), but SFX takes them to a whole new level.

Jeremy
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Ed B

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Re: Infrared season
« Reply #12 on: May 24, 2014, 10:46:22 PM »

Thanks, Larry. I have an old Canon 20D that I haven't used for several years, since I bought my 5D2. Converting that would allow me to use my Canon glass, too. Any thoughts?

Jeremy

If the 20D doesn't have live view you'll need to have a lens calibrated since IR doesn't focus at the same point as visible light.
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sdwilsonsct

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Re: Infrared season
« Reply #13 on: May 25, 2014, 04:59:00 AM »

All very good, especially #1.

DwayneOakes

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Re: Infrared season
« Reply #14 on: May 25, 2014, 09:34:35 AM »

Those are cool ! 1 and 3 for me.
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joneil

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Re: Infrared season
« Reply #15 on: May 25, 2014, 10:07:42 AM »

If the 20D doesn't have live view you'll need to have a lens calibrated since IR doesn't focus at the same point as visible light.

  Agreed about the calibration if you do not have live view.   I went this route myself (Nikon D7000 converted when I upgraded to the D700).    If you already have a collection of lenses and a spare DSLR body, especially if you are used to using that body, I really recommend you go that route.

    Another option is the "old fashioned " way as we used to do in the days of film (HIE, etc).  I still use a manual focus Nikkor (24mm, F2,8) as my favourite lens overall.   It has the red dot on it for IR focusing, and on a wide angle lens, you get it right most of the time.  But in telephoto, you need live view or calibration to be sure.

   Couple more things, that may or may not help.  First off, a lot of "experts" out there may tell you this or that lens is not useable in IR.  for example, my favourite lens above is listed on some websites as no good for IR, but you have to test and try for yourself.

   Secondly, I have been testing out Silver Efex pro, and I agree, I love it so far.  Likely will end up buying it.   However, it is a bit of money.   I am finding that the latest Corel Paint Shop Pro, 64 bit version, for the money, is fantastic.

   Attached are two HDR images I just shot for fun last weekend.  The first in Corel, the second in Lightroom/Silver Efex.   Remember, the Corel program by itself is about a third of the cost of Lightroom/SFX pro together.
enjoy
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Bruno Gil

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Re: Infrared season
« Reply #16 on: May 26, 2014, 06:44:19 PM »

Great set Larry
Love 1st and 4th

kikashi

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Re: Infrared season
« Reply #17 on: May 27, 2014, 03:56:38 AM »

If the 20D doesn't have live view you'll need to have a lens calibrated since IR doesn't focus at the same point as visible light.

Good point.

Jeremy
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