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Author Topic: shooting flying bird, still and movie  (Read 9771 times)

Ajoy Roy

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Re: shooting flying bird, still and movie
« Reply #20 on: January 23, 2014, 07:27:24 AM »

Apart from a good lens, you can try using a gun grip to ease the tracking of birds in flight.
http://www.peterpeterpeter.com/pages/bushhawk.htm

One of the most popular combos for BIF is the Nikon camera with the 300mmF4 lense and a 1.4TC. With a FF camera you get around 420mmf5.6, and with a DX sensor around 650mm equivalent.

Regarding Auto Focus, the best method is to pre focus your camera and then shoot the bird.
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Ajoy Roy, image processing

telyt

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Re: shooting flying bird, still and movie
« Reply #21 on: January 23, 2014, 09:57:14 AM »

No personal experience but several who have tried the Sony a7r are delighted with the EVF for manual focus.

Now that I've had an opportunity to handle the A7 and A7r I don't see a problem using manual focus.

Apart from a good lens, you can try using a gun grip to ease the tracking of birds in flight.
http://www.peterpeterpeter.com/pages/bushhawk.htm

I use an old model Leitz shoulder stock.
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Isaac

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Re: shooting flying bird, still and movie
« Reply #22 on: January 23, 2014, 11:56:37 AM »

Now that I've had an opportunity to handle the A7 and A7r I don't see a problem using manual focus.

So EVF technology has become good enough for you?
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telyt

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Re: shooting flying bird, still and movie
« Reply #23 on: January 23, 2014, 02:00:18 PM »

So EVF technology has become good enough for you?

I'd have to be able to use it for a few days to make that determination.  The manual focus capability of the A7 and A7r seems good, but I have not determined if viewfinder lag would be a problem for me.  I have to say I prefer the view through a good OVF (Nikon F/F2, Leicaflex SL or Leica R8) but the other features an EVF bring to the game are intriguing and in many cases can outweigh the percieved disadvantages of an EVF.
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NancyP

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Re: shooting flying bird, still and movie
« Reply #24 on: January 24, 2014, 01:20:33 PM »

In Canon-land, the 7D is currently the best APS-C body for bird photography, and for beginner's budget OEM lenses, you will hear the endless debate about 1. 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L with image stabilization versus 2. 400mm f/5.6L without image stabilization. I shoot with the 60D (slower frame rate at 5 vs 7D's 8 fps) and the 400mm f/5.6L. It took me a while to learn how to locate bird quickly, pan smoothly with the center AF point smack on the bird's head, and engage shutter smoothly. Once learned, the combo is a breeze to hand-hold all day at 2 kg total (1.25 kg lens, 0.75 kg camera body). I don't know much about adjusting AF parameters - the 60D doesn't have any, other than the mode choice between AI servo (for birds) and one-shot. The 7D is cheap now, so if you can afford a few hundred dollars more, get the 7D rather than the 60D. Skip the 70D for stills, but consider it for video. For Canon, Nikon, and Sony, Tamron just released a 150-600mm f/4.5-6.3 with stabilization that may be very good optically - reports are not yet commenting on the AF speed, the lens has been released for Canon only for a week or so.
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