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Author Topic: Sheltered  (Read 832 times)

sdwilsonsct

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Sheltered
« on: October 28, 2013, 11:52:34 PM »

Prairie houses are often surrounded by belts of spruce, ash, maple and lilac. Owls float down these corridors ahead of my morning walks.
Thanks for looking. Suggestions welcome.

Eric Myrvaagnes

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Re: Sheltered
« Reply #1 on: October 29, 2013, 12:38:24 AM »

It's fine just the way it is.
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-Eric Myrvaagnes

http://myrvaagnes.com  Visit my photo website. New images each season. Also visit my new website: http://ericneedsakidney.org

Paulo Bizarro

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Re: Sheltered
« Reply #2 on: October 29, 2013, 05:37:42 AM »

I am envious you can have morning walks in such a nice place...

sdwilsonsct

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Re: Sheltered
« Reply #3 on: October 29, 2013, 08:36:53 PM »

Thanks, Eric! Paulo: yes, I am lucky. But I wouldn't mind a seashore nearby.

Roman Racela

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Re: Sheltered
« Reply #4 on: October 29, 2013, 08:54:29 PM »

We don't have places like that in Southern California. I need to get out more often! :)

I love the image. I think it's fine the way it.
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Colorado David

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Re: Sheltered
« Reply #5 on: October 29, 2013, 10:51:33 PM »

That looks familiar.  I spent a lot of time wandering down shelter belts as a kid.  There is a definite order to them; Rows of pine, spruce, or cedar then rows of a couple of different deciduous trees, sometimes Russian olive, sometimes Osage orange also called hedge.  They were planted during the depression and dust bowl days to keep the topsoil from all blowing away.  A lot of farmers are pulling out their shelter belts to plant a few more rows of crops.  Most are finding that the increase in yield on the edge of the field is offset by a loss of yield in the middle of the field.  Farmers are planting new shelter belts now in eastern Colorado.  My grandfather said that planting shelter belts on the prairie was the only thing of any value that FDR did.  ;D

sdwilsonsct

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Re: Sheltered
« Reply #6 on: October 30, 2013, 10:06:16 PM »

My grandfather said that planting shelter belts on the prairie was the only thing of any value that FDR did.  ;D

Yes, David, the belts near here in North Dakota are within fields, designed to trap snow and leave moisture. On the north side of the boundary the belts trap snow in order to keep it off the house. They work  well, often collecting as much as 10 feet of snow.

Glad you like the image, Roman.
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