Pages: [1]   Go Down

Author Topic: Other ways to carry your gear  (Read 4537 times)

PeterAit

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2515
    • Peter Aitken Photographs
Other ways to carry your gear
« on: September 07, 2013, 09:15:04 PM »

In preparation for a trip to the southwest, I am hoping to find a better way of carrying my gear than the usual camera-around-the-neck and extra-lenses-in-a-backpack arrangement. I have seen ads for various kinds if harnesses that fit around the waist or hang from the shoulders, carrying the camera a a couple f lenses. I would love to hear from people who have used these. I am carrying a D600 and 2 or 3 extra lenses. Thanks in advance.
Logged
Peter
"Photographic technique is a means to an end, never the end itself."
View my web page
View my Facebook page

RFPhotography

  • Guest
Re: Other ways to carry your gear
« Reply #2 on: September 08, 2013, 07:11:14 AM »

What is it about the 'traditional' arrangement that you don't like?
Logged

PeterAit

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2515
    • Peter Aitken Photographs
Re: Other ways to carry your gear
« Reply #3 on: September 08, 2013, 08:23:00 AM »

What is it about the 'traditional' arrangement that you don't like?

The weight of the camera on my neck, the camera swinging around, and having to take off my pack to change lenses.
Logged
Peter
"Photographic technique is a means to an end, never the end itself."
View my web page
View my Facebook page

RFPhotography

  • Guest
Re: Other ways to carry your gear
« Reply #4 on: September 08, 2013, 10:12:06 AM »

Then I think you're looking at some of the various pouch or belt options.  The Cotton Carrier solutions may an option.
Logged

stever

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1141
Re: Other ways to carry your gear
« Reply #5 on: September 08, 2013, 10:36:54 AM »

a Blackrapid (or equivalent) strap is a far better experience than traditional camera strap - much more comfortable with almost instant access to the camera - I've carried a 5D3 and 100-400 for several hours of hiking and shooting with reasonable comfort.

I've used both the Lowepro and Thinktank belt systems (prefer the Thinktank choices).  works pretty well with 2 extra lenses plus an extra "pocket" for changing lenses.  the lightweight Thinktank water bottle holder works well for a variety of lenses.  a heavier lens like the 100-400 is not so comfortable on a belt but is okay for a while (I don't use suspenders, partly because they're a nuisance and I like to rotate the belt for access).

I also use the Thinktank Speedfreak with shoulder strap and belt (fully loaded it get's pretty heavy on the shoulder after a couple hours).  I prefer it's toploading to the side loading sling bags.  in general I don't like backbpacks for active shooting - not always easy to find a place to set it down and takes much more time, bending over, etc. to get a lens changed.
Logged

Ken Bennett

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1624
    • http://www.kenbennettphoto.com
Re: Other ways to carry your gear
« Reply #6 on: September 08, 2013, 01:28:12 PM »

I don't like cameras around my neck, either. When I need to be mobile I use a waist belt system from Think Tank and Upstrap camera straps on my cameras. The Upstraps easily keep the camera solidly on my shoulder without any slipping (so, not around my neck), and the waist belt system can be set up to carry all sorts of gear -- extra lenses, a flash, cards, batteries, etc.

Not sure I would love this for very long hikes for landscape or wildlife photography, but it's great for sports or journalism.
Logged
Equipment: a camera and some lenses. Images: Work photos. Personal photos.

Glenn NK

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 314
Re: Other ways to carry your gear
« Reply #7 on: September 08, 2013, 02:15:16 PM »

In preparation for a trip to the southwest, I am hoping to find a better way of carrying my gear than the usual camera-around-the-neck and extra-lenses-in-a-backpack arrangement. I have seen ads for various kinds if harnesses that fit around the waist or hang from the shoulders, carrying the camera a a couple f lenses. I would love to hear from people who have used these. I am carrying a D600 and 2 or 3 extra lenses. Thanks in advance.

I returned from two weeks in Europe on 4th Sept.  I carried two bodies (30D and 5DII), three lenses plus extender (24-105 f/4; 70-200 f/2.8; 24TSE), remote release, three filters, both manuals, and six CF's - in a Lowepro 302 Sling.

Other than being a bit heavy, it was very useful.

I would think with one body and two or three lenses, that this would work (would be dependent on the longest lens size/weight).

With the sling and some care, the bag does not have to be set down (it swings to a position in front of your chest for access).  Getting at the 70-200 was a bit awkward.

Glenn
Logged
Economics:  the study of achieving infinite growth with finite resources

mvsoske

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 172
    • Mark V'Soske Photography
Re: Other ways to carry your gear
« Reply #8 on: September 08, 2013, 03:15:54 PM »

Take a look at the Spider Camera holster.  I was skeptical until I tried it and now I use it with just an additional hand strap most of the time.  I don't miss the sore neck or shoulder. http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/buy/Shop-by-Brand-Spider-Camera-Holster/ci/4/phd/4188165187/N/4294255798 (Not connected with B&H or the product makers, just providing quick info.)

Mark

stever

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1141
Re: Other ways to carry your gear
« Reply #9 on: September 09, 2013, 12:07:07 AM »

I used the Upstrap for a few years, but find that the Blackrapid is superior in comfort and speed.  However I do use a wide Upstrap with Blackrapid hardware for smaller lenses as it is less bulky - the Upstrap digs in to my shoulder with heavier (than a 5D3 and 24-105) lenses
Logged

shadowblade

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1502
Re: Other ways to carry your gear
« Reply #10 on: September 09, 2013, 12:28:27 AM »

I use a belt-and-shoulder-strap harness system, put together using a combination of Lowepro, Thinktank, KATA and military surplus gear. It holds up very well, and can make heavy loads of camera gear feel like nothing.
Logged

muntanela

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 445
    • BRATA
Re: Other ways to carry your gear
« Reply #11 on: September 09, 2013, 06:26:52 PM »

A waist pack (here my Kata w-94).
« Last Edit: September 09, 2013, 06:32:02 PM by muntanela »
Logged

JimAscher

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 384
    • Jim Ascher Photos
Re: Other ways to carry your gear
« Reply #12 on: September 10, 2013, 11:35:08 AM »

I have found the Kata T-212 solves these problems for me, and it can serve either alone, or with various other Kata fanny and back backs.  Here's a review:

http://www.shuttertalk.com/2005/06/review-of-the-kata-t-212-torso-pack-and-the-w-92-waist-pack.html
Logged
Jim Ascher

See my SmugMug site:
http://jimascherphotos.smugmug.com/

NancyP

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1933
Re: Other ways to carry your gear
« Reply #13 on: September 11, 2013, 12:55:28 PM »

I love my Cotton Carrier vest system, which can carry one camera on your chest and one camera from the system belt. Heavier camera should be on the chest. I carry one camera when hiking with a backpack, and the vest works very well with a backpack full of camping gear and food/water.
Logged

Ellis Vener

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2085
    • http://www.ellisvener.com
Re: Other ways to carry your gear
« Reply #14 on: September 12, 2013, 03:05:50 PM »

I use a Thinktank Photo ShapeShifter backpack. there are d-rings on the shoulder straps you can hook carabiners through and then put the camera's strap through those  to keep the weight off of your neck. If you use it with a waist belt, you can add pouches for your most commonly used lenses, etc. up to a 70-200mm f/2.8 with hood extended.
« Last Edit: September 13, 2013, 12:49:01 PM by Ellis Vener »
Logged
Ellis Vener
http://www.ellisvener.com
Creating photographs for advertising, corporate and industrial clients since 1984.
Pages: [1]   Go Up