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Author Topic: Prophoto 1.8 gamma with 2.2 gamma displays  (Read 13895 times)

Tim Lookingbill

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Re: Prophoto 1.8 gamma with 2.2 gamma displays
« Reply #20 on: September 06, 2013, 10:01:23 PM »

If you start off with an 8-bit display pipeline and apply a white balance and gamma correction on top in the video LUTs, yes...if you have a display that does it's internal white balance and gamma adjustment in 10-bit precision, no, it won't really be a problem. That's the difference in the displays from EIZO & NEC that do their internal adjustments in 10-bit.

Does it affect how many adjustment points you can place like say in ACR's point curve tool and have it reflected in the preview?

I don't have an 10 bit internal LUT display, but I do notice this difference editing in ACR versus editing the gamma encoded data in Photoshop. Just wasn't sure if it was affected by the display profile TRC.
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Schewe

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Re: Prophoto 1.8 gamma with 2.2 gamma displays
« Reply #21 on: September 06, 2013, 10:18:09 PM »

The display and it's profile is what ACR/LR uses to show you your preview...if you have an 8-bit display with an adjusted white point and gamma, then yes, it can have an impact on your ACR display.

The display has nothing to do with points on an ACR curve though...and your preview in ACR and in Photoshop shouldn't be different.
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Tim Lookingbill

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Re: Prophoto 1.8 gamma with 2.2 gamma displays
« Reply #22 on: September 06, 2013, 10:26:12 PM »

Quote
The display has nothing to do with points on an ACR curve though...and your preview in ACR and in Photoshop shouldn't be different.

I just notice I can place more points and apply more refined detail edits represented in 100% previews working in ACR in ProPhotoRGB output space than I can applying the same edits in Photoshop in the same output working space.

I don't know why that is.

I thought it was on account of the differences between working in a linear source space in ACR versus a gamma encoded space in Photoshop.
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