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Author Topic: Why Do We Photograph?  (Read 15698 times)

Jim Pascoe

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Re: Why Do We Photograph?
« Reply #60 on: August 02, 2013, 12:20:04 PM »

Hey Rob, thanks for the well thought out reply, but you did realise that my post was referring to John Camp's slating of the professional photographer back on page one!

And the cycling reference was just a tease to you because I know how you feel about the lycra-clad hoards invading your peace over there. ;D

Best wishes

Jim
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Jim Pascoe

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Re: Why Do We Photograph?
« Reply #61 on: August 02, 2013, 12:21:40 PM »

For a moment, I thought RedwoodGuy is back. Phewww!

Who's Redwood Guy?
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Slobodan Blagojevic

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Re: Why Do We Photograph?
« Reply #62 on: August 02, 2013, 01:22:30 PM »

Who's Redwood Guy?

A former member, known for, among other things, long posts :)

Jim Pascoe

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Re: Why Do We Photograph?
« Reply #63 on: August 02, 2013, 01:24:08 PM »

A former member, known for, among other things, long posts :)

Ah, well I cannot think what you mean by that..... :)
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image66

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Re: Why Do We Photograph?
« Reply #64 on: August 02, 2013, 03:50:03 PM »

So, the only point of all this that I can understand is that the gum-smacking teenager, working minimum wage at the mall at Christmas time who knows only how to say "look here and smile" while pushing down on a buttom on the locked-down camera is superior to the expert photographer, who happens to be a president of a major corporation, but photographs out of the love of it and as an artistic release. The fact that this individual is known worldwide for his photographic and artistic skills is irrelevant. He's no pro, so he should just sit down and shut up.

Let's take Michael as an example: He is in the business of selling information, not necessarily photography. In fact, as a percentage of his entire household income, it's fair to say that he's not a professional photographer. Expert photographer? Well, that's another question. But moral superiority doesn't ride upon whether a person actually knows what he/she is doing, just that he/she is getting paid for it. So, Michael should just sit down and shut up.

As to the quote/reference/whatever from the photographer who only shoots for assignment or some such nonsense. I'd say that he isn't a photographer. He's a service-provider.

Do I believe that the unnamed company president or Michael should sit down and shut up? Of course not. But this moral superiority by SERVICE PROVIDERS WHO HAPPEN TO USE A CAMERA is pure nonsense. Besides, this "need to shoot" is described essentially as "need to earn money" totally throws real artists under the bus, because a real artist has a need to create whether anybody buys their product or not. Unfortunately, the narrow definition of pro/non-pro leaves no room for them. "Earn money or get out of my way--LOSER!"

Frankly, an argument could be made that the service providers who happen to use a camera really aren't photographers at all. They're just the same as anybody else who sells a service, whether it's dog walking, lawn mowing, or general handyman.

"I am a professional photographer!" said the man to the waitress. "That's fine and everything, but you still owe me $1.50 for that cup of coffee."

Ken -- Professional Geek
« Last Edit: August 02, 2013, 03:53:03 PM by image66 »
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Rob C

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Re: Why Do We Photograph?
« Reply #65 on: August 03, 2013, 03:55:53 AM »

Ken -- Professional Geek




On the stength of your logic and argument - you are absolutey right in your self-classification.

Congratulations!

Rob C

Manoli

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Re: Why Do We Photograph?
« Reply #66 on: August 03, 2013, 07:59:47 AM »

On the stength of your logic and argument - you are absolutey right in your self-classification.

What a puerile response. How old are you ?
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image66

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Re:
« Reply #67 on: August 03, 2013, 08:46:07 AM »

Nah. I took it as a compliment.
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leeonmaui

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Re: Why Do We Photograph?
« Reply #68 on: September 02, 2013, 09:43:51 PM »

Aloha,

Perhaps the quote would be better like this;

"The problem with the amateur photographer is; he does not reason when he takes a photograph"


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Peter Stacey

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Re: Why Do We Photograph?
« Reply #69 on: September 02, 2013, 10:58:33 PM »

So, the only point of all this that I can understand is that the gum-smacking teenager, working minimum wage at the mall at Christmas time who knows only how to say "look here and smile" while pushing down on a buttom on the locked-down camera is superior to the expert photographer, who happens to be a president of a major corporation, but photographs out of the love of it and as an artistic release. The fact that this individual is known worldwide for his photographic and artistic skills is irrelevant. He's no pro, so he should just sit down and shut up.

I wouldn't see that as the only point of this thread. I think there are different interpretations of what the original quote means. Early on, there was a message running through the discussion that it meant something along the lines of:

The challenge for the amateur photographer is that all photographic possibilities are open to them.

That often isn't true of a professional, who while having diverse interests, generally becomes known or specializes in a specific area of photography (just as many people in other professions specialize).

The quote could easily be interpreted as a lament of a professional, not as an insult to amateurs; and certainly not a comment on the technical or artistic competence of amateurs.

Somehow the message that amateurs are in a difficult (or envious) position because they have no limits was lost along the way and a huge divide opened.

I think I'll stick with the early meaning and agree with it. The big problem for me now as an amateur (I used to investigate crime scenes, so shot professionally within that area - but no longer) is that I can go out and photograph anything that pricks my interest. Trying to become proficient at any one area then takes much longer.
« Last Edit: September 02, 2013, 11:03:51 PM by Peter Stacey »
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