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Author Topic: Moderately Priced Monitors for Photo Editing  (Read 39692 times)

Steve House

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Re: Moderately Priced Monitors for Photo Editing
« Reply #20 on: June 07, 2013, 10:19:26 PM »

The 2711 was just on sale for $599 shipped again and I couldn't resist, got another one :)  I prefer it over the 2713 for it's wide gamut.  When LED backlights improve I'll switch over but I'll take the better colors in exchange for the thicker panel any day.
The U2713h IS a wide-gamut display, covering 99% aRGB, 100% sRGB, and 120% CIE.  You may be confusing it with the standard-gamut U2713hm.
« Last Edit: June 07, 2013, 10:21:03 PM by Steve House »
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kaelaria

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Re: Moderately Priced Monitors for Photo Editing
« Reply #21 on: June 07, 2013, 10:28:51 PM »

No, it's not, compared to the 2711.

Steve House

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Re: Moderately Priced Monitors for Photo Editing
« Reply #22 on: June 08, 2013, 06:41:16 AM »

No, it's not, compared to the 2711.
Sorry, but the U2713H is actually a slightly wider gamut than the older 2711.  The specs for the 2711 state "100% sRGB, 96% Adobe RGB, 110% NTSC (110% on CIE1976, 102% CIE1931)".  The U2713H is slightly wider than that at 100% sRGB, 99% Adobe RGB, and 120% CIE1976, 103% CIE1931. The U2713HM is only 82% CIE1976.  Gotta remember there are TWO different models carrying the 2713 number currently in the Dell lineup, though for some weird reason you have to actually search on the specific model number to find the U2713H in the online listings.
« Last Edit: June 08, 2013, 07:21:21 AM by Steve House »
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kaelaria

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Re: Moderately Priced Monitors for Photo Editing
« Reply #23 on: June 08, 2013, 08:16:49 AM »

Now that you edited - yes, you are absolutely correct.  The h, is the best of both worlds.  Unfortunately it's never yet been on sale lol!

Czornyj

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Re: Moderately Priced Monitors for Photo Editing
« Reply #24 on: June 08, 2013, 11:01:38 AM »

New NEC EA244WMi is quite an interesting low-budget solution.

It has a decent AH-IPS 8-bit panel controlled by 10bit 1DLUT. It doesn't have DUE (Digital Uniformity Compensation), but it's quite uniform:
https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/19059944/uniformity_2013-06-01_02-01.html

It can be hardware calibrated with free NEC GammaComp MD QA, and most of popular sensors:
http://www.necdisplay.com/support-and-services/gamma-comp/downloads

After hardware calibration it's quite linear, here's 100 patch TRC validation:
White point error = 0.686204 deltaE
Maximum neutral error (@ 0.975117) = 1.681167 deltaE
Average neutral error = 0.838355 deltaE
Number of measurements taken = 100

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/19059944/verify_2013-06-01_02-32.html
« Last Edit: June 08, 2013, 11:04:45 AM by Czornyj »
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Steve House

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Re: Moderately Priced Monitors for Photo Editing
« Reply #25 on: June 08, 2013, 02:20:38 PM »

Now that you edited - yes, you are absolutely correct.  The h, is the best of both worlds.  Unfortunately it's never yet been on sale lol!
I think it's on sale on the US site this week.  The Canadian site had it on special the last week of May for CDN$899 so I grabbed one.
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David Eichler

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Re: Moderately Priced Monitors for Photo Editing
« Reply #26 on: June 08, 2013, 11:27:36 PM »

FWIW, I ended up stretching the budget and getting a NEC PA241W and I really like it so far. Economized a bit by getting a Mac Mini as my new computer. Really prefer the NEC to the Apple displays, which are certainly not bad, as far as I can tell.
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digitaldog

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Re: Moderately Priced Monitors for Photo Editing
« Reply #27 on: June 09, 2013, 12:00:50 AM »

Good call, the PA241is a good entry level reference display system.
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Andrew Rodney
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NigelC

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Re: Moderately Priced Monitors for Photo Editing
« Reply #28 on: June 10, 2013, 06:34:32 AM »

The Dell U2723H looks like the best bet for me but I can't get a definitive idea of whether it is compatible with the Color Munki - that was a signinficant investment so I'm not going to change that.
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digitaldog

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Re: Moderately Priced Monitors for Photo Editing
« Reply #29 on: June 10, 2013, 09:32:48 AM »

The Dell U2723H looks like the best bet for me but I can't get a definitive idea of whether it is compatible with the Color Munki - that was a signinficant investment so I'm not going to change that.

There should be no problem using the Munki and their (X-rite) software on that unit.
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Andrew Rodney
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Steve House

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Re: Moderately Priced Monitors for Photo Editing
« Reply #30 on: June 10, 2013, 12:37:01 PM »

The Dell U2723H looks like the best bet for me but I can't get a definitive idea of whether it is compatible with the Color Munki - that was a signinficant investment so I'm not going to change that.
The only supported colorimeter for hardware calibration is the x-Rite i1Display 2 and it is the only one the Dell calibration software will recognize.  For software calibration any unit that is suitable for a wide-gamut monitor should work.
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AFairley

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Re: Moderately Priced Monitors for Photo Editing
« Reply #31 on: June 10, 2013, 01:28:45 PM »

A 24" Dell with and IPS screen should be in the dollar range the OP indicated.  OP, you should go with a wide gamut (IPS) monitor, you might as well be able to see as much of what's in the file your working with as possible.  You can always turn on soft-proofing (assuming your editing software supports it) to see what you will get in print or in sRGB web output.
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kaelaria

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Re: Moderately Priced Monitors for Photo Editing
« Reply #32 on: June 10, 2013, 01:44:22 PM »

I'm happy :)

GlennnM

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Re: Moderately Priced Monitors for Photo Editing
« Reply #33 on: October 30, 2013, 10:59:52 PM »

How about Dell U2713HM-IPS-LED? The price is $599, and my brother bought this one in last week.
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GlennnM

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Re: Moderately Priced Monitors for Photo Editing
« Reply #34 on: October 30, 2013, 11:01:26 PM »

See this page, http://thedigitalcamera.net/best-monitor-for-photo-editing-and-photography/ it's helpful to you choose a monitor for photo editing.
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Harry Jackson

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Re: Moderately Priced Monitors for Photo Editing
« Reply #35 on: January 07, 2015, 05:07:37 AM »

Asus PA246Q is a good buy for the purpose of photo editing.You might also want to check these other top performing monitors for photo editing in the price range you mentioned.There are more of them available for all budgets.See this page for more about top monitor products for photo editing.
« Last Edit: January 07, 2015, 05:11:10 AM by Harry Jackson »
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D Fosse

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Re: Moderately Priced Monitors for Photo Editing
« Reply #36 on: January 07, 2015, 07:39:53 AM »

See this page for more about top monitor products for photo editing.

Not to quibble over brands and models, but I still have a couple of reservations. For instance:

  • The higher the contrast ratio, the better for our purpose here because a higher contrast ratio produces better display qualities such as clear and vivid images. The ideal value we recommend for photo editing is a constant contrast ratio of 1000:1.

What you want is a good screen to output match. No papers reach even close to 1000:1 - even the very best glossy photo papers rarely exceed 300:1, and matte papers 150:1 or less. Offset print is even lower. So with a display at 1000:1 you're guaranteed an unpleasant surprise.

High-end integrated hardware calibrators such as Spectraview or Colornavigator let you fine-tune the black point/contrast ratio for different types of output. This is such an important aspect of critical calibration that it should be mentioned in any discussion about monitors for photo editing.

And further:

  • Generally speaking, the bigger the screen, the wider and better the view.

Well, yes, but few people realize just how much prices skyrocket with an increase in panel size. Size is the single biggest cost factor, and most people have budgets. So instead of encouraging people to go bigger, a much sounder advice is to go down in size to get substantially better quality for the same price.

There's more, but this'll do for now...
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Harry Jackson

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Re: Moderately Priced Monitors for Photo Editing
« Reply #37 on: January 12, 2015, 12:54:01 PM »

Not to quibble over brands and models, but I still have a couple of reservations. For instance:

  • The higher the contrast ratio, the better for our purpose here because a higher contrast ratio produces better display qualities such as clear and vivid images. The ideal value we recommend for photo editing is a constant contrast ratio of 1000:1.

What you want is a good screen to output match. No papers reach even close to 1000:1 - even the very best glossy photo papers rarely exceed 300:1, and matte papers 150:1 or less. Offset print is even lower. So with a display at 1000:1 you're guaranteed an unpleasant surprise.

High-end integrated hardware calibrators such as Spectraview or Colornavigator let you fine-tune the black point/contrast ratio for different types of output. This is such an important aspect of critical calibration that it should be mentioned in any discussion about monitors for photo editing.

And further:

  • Generally speaking, the bigger the screen, the wider and better the view.

Well, yes, but few people realize just how much prices skyrocket with an increase in panel size. Size is the single biggest cost factor, and most people have budgets. So instead of encouraging people to go bigger, a much sounder advice is to go down in size to get substantially better quality for the same price.

There's more, but this'll do for now...



Noted. And thanks @D Fosse for shedding more light on some very important aspects discussed on that page.
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