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Author Topic: large scale landscapes  (Read 6499 times)

Ken Bennett

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Re: large scale landscapes
« Reply #20 on: May 17, 2013, 05:14:44 PM »

One tilts the camera for multi-row stitching. One reason why something like the Nodal Ninja or the Really Right Stuff pano rotators are popular. Also, when you test this, you'll see how much overlap you need, and how much extra space you want to shoot at the ends to get enough to crop what you want later. It's sort of hit and miss at the beginning, and I'm still learning.

Finally, be careful if parts of your subject are moving (people, or blowing leaves.) That can make the stitch more difficult.
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Equipment: a camera and some lenses. Images: Work photos. Personal photos.

markmullen

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Re: large scale landscapes
« Reply #21 on: June 09, 2013, 06:15:52 AM »

If you can borrow or hire a 24mm TS-E it is dead easy to do a 3 shot stitched panorama with no parallax issues just by using shift in each direction.
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PhotoEcosse

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Re: large scale landscapes
« Reply #22 on: June 09, 2013, 01:57:08 PM »

Don't forget that the vast majority of the advertising stills that are projected on to 40-foot cinema screens were taken with normal dSLR cameras.

In fact, 10 years ago, they were being taken with 6Mp dSLRs.

When viewed at normal cinema auditorium distances, they look fine.

Also, don't confuse your dpi with your ppi. There is no connection whatsoever.
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BarbaraArmstrong

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Re: large scale landscapes
« Reply #23 on: July 02, 2013, 02:53:39 AM »

The empty corner and edge jaggies resulting from the stitch can sometimes/often be salvaged with the Magic Wand to do the selection and Content-Aware Fill from the Edit menu.  Areas of blue sky, sand, pebbles, grass, etc. are often amenable to this solution, and you can thus avoid losing print size by not having to crop them out.  Yes, a "creative" solution, but one I am comfortable with if it does not misrepresent the scene. --Barbara
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OldRoy

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Re: large scale landscapes
« Reply #24 on: July 05, 2013, 04:25:53 AM »

Lots of sound advice here. A couple of points that I'd emphasize.
Overshoot the scene so that you've got plenty of cropping area that you can lose.
If there's relatively close foreground make sure that you've got the NPP as your rotation point. Remember that for a zoom this position is unlikely to be the same at all focal lengths!
Buy PTGui. It's a brilliant program.
Roy
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Ajoy Roy

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Re: large scale landscapes
« Reply #25 on: July 23, 2013, 09:22:01 AM »

I use Microsoft ICE regularly to stitch site photos from my 5MP cell phone camera. All shots are handheld with 10-30% overlap. I have done 3 shot to 5x5 shot panoramas. The results are excellent.

Keep in mind that any extra regions can be trimmed but regions missed can never be there, hence I take at least 15% extra all round.

As cell phones camera shots are Auto every thing, there is a wide variation in exposure shot to shot, but ICE takes care of every thing.

Another software I use is "Hugin". This is much slower than ICE but I can use HDR to merge widely exposed shots. For example I take a shot of interior of building during construction. The corners are dark and the window opening very bright. In Hugin the HDR option merges all the frames and balances the exposure.
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Ajoy Roy, image processing
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